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Better Thinking by Not Thinking: Accessing your Unconsciousness - Liz Guthridge

Better Thinking by Not Thinking:  Accessing your Unconsciousness - Liz Guthridge | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Where do you do your best thinking? Anywhere but your desk, if you’re like most knowledge workers and leaders. And probably not at work either. Not thinking, but relaxing into your unconscious can produce better thinking."

 

Change colleague Liz Guthridge has a winner of a post on accessing quality thinking by simply not thinking for a spell.  Techniques of mindful meditation, rest (or siesta, as I'd prefer from my Argentine side), as well as just stepping away for a break can contribute to a fresh view and insights from the deep well of our unconscious. ~ DN

 

Excerpts:

 

_________________________

 

Individuals tend to get good ideas while driving, exercising, reading, meditating or talking to others.

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That’s because we automatically tap into our unconsciousness to do most of our thinking. It doesn’t require effort on our part, as David Rock explains. Even better, our unconsciousness—which can seem as vast as the Milky Way—makes powerful connections for us.

  

...Offices are not brain-friendly settings.

  

Her steps to access include:

  

1. Quiet your brain. Start by putting aside all of the electronic gadgets that stimulate you and your brain. You also may want to close your eyes.

  

2. Let your mind wander. (DN:  Mindfulness practices teaches us to observe thoughts, but to NOT engage them.)

  

3. Put yourself in a positive state. 

 

4. Do something else other than work on the issue, problem or dilemma you’re facing. 

  

===

  

Read Liz's post in full here, which includes my commentary on accessing both the Jungian appreciation of the unconcious and using tools, like the MBTI used at the second level of functioning.


~  Deb


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Finding Innovation Help Next Door, Even in your Past, Forgotten Experience | Innovation Excellence |

Finding Innovation Help Next Door, Even in your Past, Forgotten Experience | Innovation Excellence | | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Great examples of ways to cultivate innovation - other companies in other industries, other verticals:  “Who else has solved a similar problem?”


A medical device company that made angioplasty equipment wanted to create a computer simulation that would predict how the “balloon” would expand.


Where did they turn for an accurate computer model?


In the past, they worked with car manufacturers and built statistical models that simulated the expansion and contraction of airbags. This proved to be a wildly accurate way of predicting how a balloon catheter would operate.


When you are working on your next business challenge, ask yourself:

“Who else has solved a similar problem?”


In doing so, you might significantly accelerate your innovation effort.


Blog author Stephen Shapiro is the author of five books including “Best Practices Are Stupid” and “Personality Poker” (both published by Penguin). 

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The Yin and the Yang of Corporate Innovation, Apple & Google CEO shifts in leaders

The Yin and the Yang of Corporate Innovation, Apple & Google CEO shifts in leaders | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Apple and Google take very different paths to innovation, but the gap between their approaches may be closing ."


The New York Times, interviews John Kao, an innovation adviser to corporations and governments — and a jazz pianist — pre-performance and talk at the pending 2012 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland.


A few excerpts:

The Google model relies on rapid experimentation and data.  It takes a bottom-up approach to customers as participants and partners in product design.


The Apple model is more edited, intuitive and top-down.  Regarding market research into Apple designs, Steve Jobs' standard answer was none. “It’s not the consumers’ job to know what they want,” he would add.


From these yin/yang cultures, we have this final quote in the article:


In the months after Larry Page, the Google co-founder, took over as chief executive last April, the company eliminated a diverse collection of more than two dozen projects, a nudge toward top-down leadership.


And Timothy D. Cook, Apple’s C.E.O., will almost surely be a more bottom-up leader than Mr. Jobs.


“What we’re likely to see,” Mr. Kao says, “is Google and Apple each borrowing from the playbook of the other.”

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