Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
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Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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Disruptive Technology and Innovation Requires Change Management & New Talent Strategy

Disruptive Technology and Innovation Requires Change Management & New Talent Strategy | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
HR professionals know that anything that causes business disruptions is certain to have implications for human resource management, including the growth of 3-D printing.


I admit I'm looking forward to it. I think the 3-D printer is such a disruptive technology that I want to be in on the fun.


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...The teenager found the plans on the Internet. Imagine, open-sourced body parts!

    

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The news reports range from 3-D printing an iPhone case to high-heel shoes, or models of body parts on which doctors can practice.


...my favorite use of the technology so far goes to a teenager who used a 3-D printer at a local library to build a prosthetic hand for a boy who was born without fingers. The hand opens and closes and can even hold a pencil. The teenager found the plans on the Internet. Imagine, open-sourced body parts!


Implications for HR leaders? 
  

McKinsey recently issued a report highlighting some of the business disruptions that are likely to result from this new technology.



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... there may be very specific, and difficult to find, talent requirements for such a shift, and begin to devise a talent-development and sourcing strategy to meet the [need]

   

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3-D technology  -- aka additive manufacturing -- is likely to accelerate product development.  ... Value may not come from manufacturing a product; it may come from being able to add uniqueness to the design alone.

   

  • Don't wait until someone tells you it might have an impact: Know the business well enough to raise the issue if no one has mentioned it already. 
     
  • Help the executive team consider the strategic implications of the technology and whether it can be leveraged to the business' advantage or whether the business needs to be prepared to meet new forms of competition.
    
  • Recognize that there may be very specific, and difficult to find, talent requirements for such a shift, and begin to devise a talent-development and sourcing strategy to meet the skilled-worker needs of a new manufacturing strategy.

 

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This is a quality article emphasizing the need to be ready for adaptive change, perhaps fast.  As author Susan R. Meisinger suggests, be "not only be prepared to manage the change, ...be leaders within the organization in embracing and driving change."  I'd add, create a learning environment now with leadership at all levels to empower your ability to change together.  Share what's important to be ready.  ~  D

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Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Change Leadership Watch
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Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks

Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen literally wrote the book on technology disruption...and he thinks Apple, Tesla Motors, venture capitalists and most of the nation’s colleges and universities should be afraid."

  

The author of The Innovator’s Dilemma said Wednesday that all of them could be killed by less advanced competitors in the same way that many once dominant technology companies have been in the past.

  

...He believes that and the commoditization of smartphones threaten Apple in the long run.

  

...“For 300 years, higher education was not disruptable because there was no technological core."

  

“But now online learning brings to higher education this technological core, and people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.'

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...people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.

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...“there is a different business model that is disrupting this in addition to online learning. It’s on-the-job education. ...you come in for a week and we’ll teach you about strategy and you go off and develop a strategy.  


...You learn it and you use it. These are very different business models and that’s what’s killing us.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've posted this to BOTH Change Leader Watch & here.  On the Innovations & Institutions stream, I'll be adding examples of organizations that are adapting to this disruption in academe and the other industries mentioned.  ~  Deb

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Marie Jeffery's comment, February 11, 2013 11:13 AM
KMInstitute.org
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, February 17, 2013 4:30 PM
Thanks for your comments Marie. Knowledge Management is quite an industry, with various opinions of the traction it holds in business. I am most curious as to where it is headed.
Patrick J Scanlon's curator insight, March 12, 2013 5:58 PM

If you don't like change.  You will like irrelevance even less #media #higherEd #VC