Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
3.2K views | +0 today
Follow
Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?
Where innovation is happening beyond the stuff of small start-ups & tech companies. For the BEST of the BEST curated news in performance, change, agile learning, innovation, motivation and careers, SUBSCRIBE to REVELN.com/Tools/
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

5 Examples of Companies Innovating with Crowdsourcing

5 Examples of Companies Innovating with Crowdsourcing | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"The rapid exchange of data needed to maintain competitiveness demands access to multiple, fluid sources of information.  Crowdsourcing helps this happen."

        

Excerpts, 3 examples:
    

Anheuser-Busch (AB)– The world’s leading brewer, ...sought customer input to develop a brand more attuned to craft-beer tastes. Development of Black Crown, a golden amber lager, combined a competition between company-brewmasters with consumer suggestions and tastings; this project had more than 25,000 consumer-collaborators.


Coca-Cola– Coke now uses a more open business model, assuming an increasingly prominent position in corporate crowdsourcing. Its open-sourced “Shaping a Better Future” challenge asks entrepreneurs to create improvement-ventures for the project-hubs of youth employment, education, environment and health.

ucts more effectively, once again tying social media to co-creation.  


Unilever– Despite its globally-recognized and respected research staff and facilities, Unilever understands the value of collaboration with innovative partners from outside the firm. It seeks external contributions from anyone with useful input into such diverse project challenges as storing renewable energy, fighting viruses, reducing the quantity of sodium in food, creating cleaning-products that pollute less.


Click the title to see the full list of 5.


Related tools & [posts by Deb:


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Here are some current, corporate examples of crowdsourcing, which is also finding its way to government and non-profits as well.   Some say that anything corporate, or having top-down management of the project or guidance from an external organisation for solely commercial constructs is not crowdsourcing.

Regardless, now that complex, adaptive systems has arrived as a part of the conversation, along with terms like  M4IS2  (Multinational, Multiagency, Multidisciplinary, Multidomain Information-Sharing and Sense-Making)  - crowdsourcing will have a chance to prove if it is a sign of our times, including concepts of creative destruction and reinvention. ~ D

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, February 26, 2014 3:12 PM

Here are some current, corporate examples of crowdsourcing, which is also finding its way to government and non-profits as well.   Some say that anything corporate, or having top-down management of the project or guidance from an external organisation for solely commercial constructs is not crowdsourcing.

Regardless, now that complex, adaptive systems has arrived as a part of the conversation, along with terms like  M4IS2  (Multinational, Multiagency, Multidisciplinary, Multidomain Information-Sharing and Sense-Making)  - crowdsourcing will have a chance to prove if it is a sign of our times, including concepts of creative destruction and reinvention. ~ D

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Google Reveals Its 9 Principles of Innovation

Google Reveals Its 9 Principles of Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

What makes Google the holy grail of productivity and creativity? Take a look at their nine core principles of innovation.  


Excerpts:


1. INNOVATION COMES FROM ANYWHERE

...top down as well as bottom up, and in the places you least expect.


...a medical doctor on Google’s staff argued persuasively that Google had a moral obligation to extend help to those typing searches under the phrase "how to commit suicide." He ignited the charge to adjust the search engine's response so that the top of the screen reveals the toll free phone number for the National Suicide Prevention Hotline. The call volume went up by nine percent soon thereafter. The same change has been adopted in many other countries.


3. AIM TO BE TEN TIMES BETTER

..aim...to improve things by ten percent, you will only see incremental change. ...think 10 times improvement, and that will force you to think outside the box.


...n 2004, Google started its Google Books project and set forth a challenge to organize all the world's information and digitize all the books ever printed in history.


...Google has now scanned 30 million of the 130 million books they first set out to scan, and dozens of libraries around the world are participating in the project.


4. BET ON TECHNICAL INSIGHTS

Every organization has unique insights, and if you bet on it, it leads to major innovation. Google engineers, not the auto industry, came up with the idea of driverless cars after seeing that millions of traffic deaths come from human error.


The others?

2. FOCUS ON THE USER.


5. SHIP AND ITERATE


6. GIVE EMPLOYEES 20 PERCENT TIME


7. DEFAULT TO OPEN PROCESSES


8. FAIL WELL


9. HAVE A MISSION THAT MATTERS



Related posts by Deb:

     

Messing up a Change Implementation with Someone Else’s Learning Culture?

       

3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way


           

A Two Step, Two Video Dance towards Loose – Tight Change & Innovation Leadership

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This inspiring list can stimulate great discussions at all levels for what YOU want in your own culture, mission and vision and management practices.

One caution to note, culture change is not for amateurs.   Take a look at the article references I've listed above for some of the reasons why.

~  Deb 

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 20, 2013 11:00 AM

From our Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend?  curation news:  This list can inspire useful discussions at all levels for what YOU want in your own culture, mission and vision and management practices.

One caution, having a meeting on such a topic or deciding to change culture is not for amateurs.   Take a look at the article references I've listed above for some of the reasons why.

~  Deb 

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Why We Must Invest In Millennials To Survive ~ What They Want in a Career

Why We Must Invest In Millennials To Survive ~ What They Want in a Career | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Find out why understanding the Millennial generation is important, if not crucial to a business' survival."


No single trend has a greater impact on business, government or the role of technology in the world than the emerging millennial workforce. ...[They are the]...  largest purchasing class in the world.


Excerpted:


  • They are the first generation born into the mobile device. According to a survey, millennials would rather give up driving than their smartphone or laptop.
  • They are driven by purpose, rather than professional recognition.....they care more about making a positive difference than workplace recognition.
  • They ...they want a meaningful career....not old school companies.
______________________________
       
....millennial consumers don’t buy products, they buy experiences and they want easy access
       
______________________________
      

In his keynote, Bill McDermott said, “Millennials are disruptive and creative...They will define the future of work into an environment that is highly digitized, mobile, social and of course, sustainable  ... “dematerializing and demonetizing at a breathtaking pace,” impacting markets in a disruptive way.

    

....millennial consumers don’t buy products, they buy experiences and they want easy access to these experiences.

    

...almost every mobile device maker is now trying to capitalize on the next biggest idea – wearable technology.


Related posts by Deb:
     

3 Success Factors for High Performance Teams, and What Gets In the Way (includes interview with a Millennial)

       

3 Things That Cause Ethical Breakdowns in Workplace Culture: Timing a Reminder is Everything     

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Juicy nuggets of trend watching on this generational keynote useful for innovation forecasting from SAP's business innovation blog.  

Do you agree with the characteristics listed for Millennials, dematerializing and demonetizing? ~  Deb

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 4, 2013 8:20 PM

Rescooped from my Innovation and Institutions curation stream.  Do you agree with the characteristics listed for Millennials, dematerializing and demonetizing and the statement of their huge impact as the "largest purchasing class in the world? " ~  Deb

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 18, 2013 1:07 PM

Do you agree with the characteristics listed for Millennials, dematerializing and demonetizing and the statement of their huge impact as the "largest purchasing class in the world? "


From Careers & Self-Aware Strength which also features recent articles on creativity and the End of Jobs.    ~  Deb

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from What I Wish I Had Known
Scoop.it!

For J.C. Penney, a Tough Lesson in Listening, to Whom and Shopper Psychology

For J.C. Penney, a Tough Lesson in Listening, to Whom and Shopper Psychology | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Because of the quirks of human psychology, simplifying pricing isn’t so simple. J.C. Penney learned that lesson the hard way.


...consumers are conditioned to wait for deals and sales, partly because they do not have a good sense of how much an item should be worth to them and need cues to figure that out.


Just having a generically fair or low price, as Penney did, said Alexander Chernev, a marketing professor at the Kellogg School of Management at Northwestern University, assumes that consumers have some context for how much items should cost. But they don’t.




Via Anita
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Connected to the last post regarding when and how to listen to customers, along with innovation.  ~  Deb

more...
Anita's curator insight, April 16, 2013 8:21 AM

When the numbers don't tell the whole story.

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

The innovation mind behind Tesla, SpaceX, SolarCity: Elon Musk

Entrepreneur Elon Musk is a man with many plans. The founder of PayPal, Tesla Motors and SpaceX sits down with TED curator Chris Anderson to share details about what's next.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Shared from my Change Leadership Watch as a companion to another innovation post about Elon Musk on this stream.

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 21, 2013 10:56 PM

A TED talk that has made it to the list, "15 TED Talks That Will Change Your Life," belongs on this stream, and goes with a previous post here a few days ago.  ~  Deb

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Innovation vs. Measurement & Systems: Leadership Is Always The Key

Innovation vs. Measurement & Systems:  Leadership Is Always The Key | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Think of “win-lose” structures in incentives.  If you can only win if someone else loses, what are the odds of your developing a working relationship grounded in trust?"

Trust:

Strong leadership can recognize “win-lose” structures or norms and work to eliminate them.  It seems obvious that leadership drives trust, not systems.


_________________________

Without ...systems ...built to allow for ...individual and group failure, risk will always be a negative organizational value. 


_________________________


DIVERSITY:      . . . of people, points of view, ideas, ethics, and beliefs.  Diversity is what drives and powers iteration, constant challenge, testing, playing, and randomness. Strong leadership will drive (or diminish) diversity much more profoundly than will the most deeply embedded systems.  


RISK:     Risk tolerance and the attractiveness of rapid iteration are the hallmarks of innovative organizations.  Without operational systems that are built to allow for and to contextualize individual and group failure, risk will always be a negative organizational value.


...Should you be thinking a little more about how you encourage and foster strong leadership, and a little less about your systems of measurement and evaluation.?  You might be surprised by where this reflection will take you.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The venture capitalist who wrote this post has a view I share on putting measurement and evaluation within the right context, including a certain tolerance for enough risk-taking to help organizations be adaptive and "anti-fragile." ~  Deb

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 5, 2013 8:29 PM

This is also shared here via Performance and Talent Development because of the theme of leadership above performance systems, and leadership to build an innovation, adaptive culture that trumps traditional measurement practices. ~  D

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from New Work, New Livelihood, Careers
Scoop.it!

Need a Job? Invent It & Learn from Finland

Need a Job? Invent It & Learn from Finland | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Finding a job is so 20th century. That is why young people today need to be more “innovation ready” than “college ready.”


We need lab schools where students earn a high school diploma by completing a series of skill-based ‘merit badges’ in things like entrepreneurship. And schools of education where all new teachers have ‘residencies’ with master teachers and performance standards — not content standards — must become the new normal throughout the system.”


Who is doing it right?


“Finland is one of the most innovative economies in the world,” he said, “and it is the only country where students leave high school ‘innovation-ready.’  They learn concepts and creativity more than facts, and have a choice of many electives — all with a shorter school day, little homework, and almost no testing.

[In the US, look at the] growing number of ‘reinvented’ colleges like the Olin College of Engineering, the M.I.T. Media Lab and the ‘D-school’ at Stanford where students learn to innovate.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The new economy is not about corporate jobs.  Haven't we seen that coming?  ~  Deb

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, May 21, 2013 4:50 PM

Thomas Friedman is giving us perspective on what's here now and what's coming.  Solo-preneurs, entrepreneurs, the power of the network is becoming core to work in the new economy.   Hiding away in corporate job structures has been vaporizing, more quickly than the almost overnight shift from big cars to smaller ones in the 70s.  Are you ready?  Are your kids ready?  ~  Deb

 

Dominik Bláha's curator insight, September 24, 2013 3:45 PM

Yes!

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

What Nassim Taleb Misses About Technology and Innovation

What Nassim Taleb Misses About Technology and Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"What Nassim Taleb misses about technology and innovation is that its purpose is not to entertain the delicate tastes of the chattering classes, but to improve the lives of us all.  ...What’s more, most of technology’s black swans are positive ones."


Excerpts: The Usefulness Of Useless Things


What Mr. Taleb fails to understand is that technologists are supremely aware that most of their efforts will come to nothing


_______________________

What, I wonder, would Mr. Taleb make of Edison’s 9,999th try?


_______________________


...They are, in fact, searching out black swans (to use Mr. Taleb’s own parlance), in full knowledge that they will spend most of their time rushing up blind alleys.  


What, I wonder, would Mr. Taleb make of Edison’s 9,999th try?

The truth is that useless things often end up very useful indeed.  Modern information technology did not originate with engineers, but has its roots in an obscure academic crisis, whose major figures, such as Cantor, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Gödel and others never dreamed that their work would have important practical consequences.


...What Mr. Taleb seems to miss is that these are ...people dedicated to following their dreams and willing to put their own skin in the game to do so.


What’s more, most of technology’s black swans are positive ones. 

As [Greg Satell] recently wrote in the Harvard Business Review, “Innovation is a particularly sticky problem because it so often remains undefined.”  You can’t simply focus on the technologies that are sure bets, but must take into account the entire matrix (pictured in the article, four quadrants.)

 

... the logical consequence of his argument) is that we should remain in the upper right quadrant, where both the problem and the domain are well defined and he would presumably assign the lowest value on basic research and disruptive innovation, which have no clear applicability.


Yet it is there that we break truly new ground.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've shared news about Taleb's perspective on Change Leadership Watch. It's now paired with this innovation perspective about the place of failure! a compelling view.  ~ D

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 28, 2013 11:16 PM

This is a follow-up on the "Anti-Fragile" post below.  The author discusses failure is an important part of the process leading to success, as author Greg Satell explains via the nature of innovation.  


This seems to be a worthy new perspective and critique of Taleb's work, also listed in our Innovation and Institutions curation stream.  ~  Deb

Bill LeGray's comment, April 29, 2013 11:26 AM
Good thoughts verey deeply buried within the Social Media mileau. BUT not so deep I will not try to follow the Change Leadership Watch, and other excellent Forums provided by Scoop It. In fact, while quite broad, the entire Innovatioon and Institutions stream may be worth a look now and then. Deb; "Thanks for leading the way for creativity, process changes, and obtaining "better" innovations and institutions with more properly responsive institutional outcomes."
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, April 30, 2013 3:37 PM
Thanks for the comment Bill. Best to you.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Agile Learning
Scoop.it!

MOOCs, Blended Learning on Stage with Charlie Rose - Online Education

MOOCs, Blended Learning on Stage with Charlie Rose - Online Education | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"I will say the blended model, ...with certainty, is revolutionizing, higher education." "...access to a Master Teacher..."  ~ Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania


Charlie interviews:

  • Anant Agarwal, CEO of edX;
  • Amy Gutmann, president of the University of Pennsylvania;
  • Joel Klein, former New York City Schools chancellor and CEO of Amplify and
  • Tom Friedman of the New York 


Related posts by Deb:

  
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

A blend of views discuss MOOCs and on-line education.  Note the access and pacing comments of Anant Agarwal from edX and what he's implying.  ~  Deb

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 26, 2013 2:22 PM

Pacing the learning, removing the exclusive, high expense of the classic 4 year degree, access to "Master Teachers," are some the the advantages.

An alternative view of higher education was forecast by a guest blogger on my own website who built his own degree at a much lower cost, listed above, "Right Sizing..."   ~ Deb

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Big Data, Challenging HR Beliefs, Empowering Worker Success

Big Data, Challenging HR Beliefs, Empowering Worker Success | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Work history does not matter as much as we think it does, and bosses matter more — these are findings from an emerging field called work-force science."

  

...Work-force science, in short is what happens when Big Data meets H.R.

   

....“This is absolutely the way forward,” says Peter Cappelli, director of the Center for Human Resources at the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania. “Most companies have been flying completely blind.”

  

Today, every e-mail, instant message, phone call, line of written code and mouse-click leaves a digital signal. These patterns can now be inexpensively collected and mined for insights into how people work and communicate, potentially opening doors to more efficiency and innovation within companies.



____________________________


...research ...found that the most important characteristic for sales success is a kind of emotional courage...even after initially being told no.


____________________________



For example:


...Tim Geisert, chief marketing officer for I.B.M.’s Kenexa unit, observed that an outgoing personality has traditionally been assumed to be the defining trait of successful sales people.

But its research, based on millions of worker surveys and tests, as well as manager assessments, has found that the most important characteristic for sales success is a kind of emotional courage, a persistence to keep going even after initially being told no.



____________________________


...numbers and grades alone did not prove to spell success at Google and are no longer used as important hiring criteria....

____________________________



For years, [Google] candidates were screened according to SAT scores and college grade-point averages, metrics favored by its founders. But numbers and grades alone did not prove to spell success at Google and are no longer used as important hiring criteria....

Google has found that the most innovative workers — also the “happiest,” by its definition — are those who have a strong sense of mission about their work and who also feel that they have much personal autonomy.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

This may explain a few things, and encourage more focus on the hiring process and less on over-managing what comes after.  ~  D

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 21, 2013 11:04 PM

There are many implications for using the results for also helping individuals find more successful and satisfying career paths as well.  ~  D

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Success Case Study: Pitching a Learning Tool Directly to Professors

Success Case Study:  Pitching a Learning Tool Directly to Professors | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Instead of convincing universities to take a chance on its classroom engagement platform, Top Hat Monocle made direct contact with professors who asked students to also pick up the tab.


...most students carried mobile devices...which could be used for in-class interaction. [The founders] ...developed a prototype product that focused on quizzing and polling students, and pilot-tested the prototype in two classes.


_____________________

Large organizations have a very long sales cycle ... catch them outside of [their] budget cycle, you may not get another chance for a year or two.

_____________________



“Selling to large organizations like universities, governments and big corporations is difficult and time-consuming. Large organizations have a very long sales cycle and if you catch them outside of a budget cycle, you may not get another chance for a year or two.”



THE SOLUTION

The founders decided to “consumerize the classroom” by focusing on individual professors, rather than universities. This made sense because the value proposition was focused on the classroom and because professors have much latitude in making adoption decisions.

THE RESULT


This academic year, it is being used by 2,000 professors and more than 150,000 students at 300 universities worldwide. More than 80 per cent of these universities are in the United States.


The company has 75 employees, offices in three countries, and has been able to raise another $9.1-million in financing.

 

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

If you've seen drug companies advertising in the media directly to you, vs. your doctor or health system, you've seen another angle on this.  How do innovative ideas take hold in your institution today?  ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

The Science of Success with Innovation Research

The Science of Success with Innovation Research | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"She started her own creativity and innovation consultancy company to do what was NOT being done, – using academic research to improve innovation in companies"


Amantha Imber wondered why the research she had read was not being applied to help firms innovate.


What was the use of having a body of scientific research, including proven drivers to innovation, if it was not being used to help companies grow?


“There was a gap between academic research and what happens ‘in the real world’,” she says.


_____________________

"..staff need to feel a sense of challenge. They also need to have the resources to deliver."

_____________________

Six years later the consultancy she founded, Inventium, is advising some of the world’s best-known corporations, including Coca-Cola Amatil, American Express, Qantas and Commonwealth Bank of Australia.


Inventium won this year’s BRW Client Choice Award for best management consulting firm. The awards are run by Beaton and are based on responses from more than 40,000 professional services clients to ensure their independence.


...“People talk about trying to build a culture of innovation. From analysis we know what sorts of elements need to be present,” Imber says.

“One of the most important is that staff need to feel a sense of challenge. They also need to have the resources to deliver.

People need to feel that risk-taking is allowed and failure is not terrible, but rather an opportunity to learn.”


She says there are keys to transforming ideas into realities.


“Crush assumptions,” she says. “Whenever we set out to solve a problem, we have assumptions that fence in our thinking.


By deliberately crushing assumptions and asking ‘What if the opposite was true?’ you can significantly increase your  creativity.”


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Quite the success story. Congratulations to Amantha Imber and the companies she's helped be successful. ~ Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks

Why Apple, Academia, Tesla & VCs May Die, Disruption Guru Christensen Talks | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen literally wrote the book on technology disruption...and he thinks Apple, Tesla Motors, venture capitalists and most of the nation’s colleges and universities should be afraid."

  

The author of The Innovator’s Dilemma said Wednesday that all of them could be killed by less advanced competitors in the same way that many once dominant technology companies have been in the past.

  

...He believes that and the commoditization of smartphones threaten Apple in the long run.

  

...“For 300 years, higher education was not disruptable because there was no technological core."

  

“But now online learning brings to higher education this technological core, and people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.'

__________________

    

...people who are very complacent are in deep trouble.

__________________


...“there is a different business model that is disrupting this in addition to online learning. It’s on-the-job education. ...you come in for a week and we’ll teach you about strategy and you go off and develop a strategy.  


...You learn it and you use it. These are very different business models and that’s what’s killing us.”

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've posted this to BOTH Change Leader Watch & here.  On the Innovations & Institutions stream, I'll be adding examples of organizations that are adapting to this disruption in academe and the other industries mentioned.  ~  Deb

more...
Marie Jeffery's comment, February 11, 2013 11:13 AM
KMInstitute.org
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's comment, February 17, 2013 4:30 PM
Thanks for your comments Marie. Knowledge Management is quite an industry, with various opinions of the traction it holds in business. I am most curious as to where it is headed.
Patrick J Scanlon's curator insight, March 12, 2013 5:58 PM

If you don't like change.  You will like irrelevance even less #media #higherEd #VC

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from 21st Century Teaching and Learning
Scoop.it!

27 Ways to Inspire Students to Innovate

27 Ways to Inspire Students to Innovate | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it
Educator Mia MacMeekin made this infographic about ways to inspire students to think more deeply about how innovation applies to them.


Related posts & tools by Deb:

  • Don't miss a thing:  We'll send Best of the Best news, from Deb's @Deb Nystrom, REVELN (change, agile learning, performance, careers), once a month via email, directly to you, for free.  Preview it here, via REVELN Tools.

Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

After taking a look at this catchy infographic, what does innovation mean to you?  ~  D

more...
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, November 29, 2013 7:36 PM

Creative activities that can allow the students to develop innovative thinking.

Richard Platt's curator insight, December 8, 2013 11:40 PM

(from the Curator of IoT & Wearables): We've stayed away from many academic's re: how to enable students to be better at problem solving and innovating, (because most academics think they already know what innovation and complex problem solving is all about and well not to put too fine a point on it they just don't),  

 

We do take issue wtih the status quo of academia.  Obviously we have strongly held views on engineering education and problem solving / innovaiton, but they are warranted and justified.

 

We see most academic work in the area of innovating, problem solving / problem finding and more specifically in complex problem solving in the domain of engineering  to be broken., biased and prejudicial  

 

Nonetheless we do give credit in this post by Mia MacMeekin as it is a move in the right direction, we just don't see it going far enough to make problem solving and problem finding cool or effective enough for students to really be able to do anything significant with when it comes time for them to contribute.  Sorry we call it as we see it..  

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

A Credit Card Regulation That Worked for Consumers & Banks Too

A Credit Card Regulation That Worked for Consumers & Banks Too | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Economists found that the Card Act, passed in 2009, saved consumers billions of dollars by cutting through a tangle of credit card fees.  ...and more."


Congress decided to force down the hidden fees that credit card companies collect from their customers. It passed a law called the 2009 Credit Card Accountability Responsibility and Disclosure Act   ...It's a clear case of regulation that worked. 


____________________________

...the new law saved customers an annualized 2.8 percent of the average daily balance on cards - [$20.8 billion ...

____________________________



..the authors of the new study access to information on more than 150 million credit card accounts. They found that on average, the new law saved customers an annualized 2.8 percent of the average daily balance on cards - [a] $20.8 billion estimate.


…a surprising discovery made in the new paper: Subprime credit card holders do default more often than others, but the interest and fees they paid made them far more profitable for the banks than any other groups of credit card holders, even during the financial crisis.



“This was probably the worst period in modern history to be a lender...when banks were hemorrhaging money on subprime loans, subprime credit cards were a major source of profits.” With profits that high, banks could still do well even with lower fees.


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Some good news:  a case study where the researchers, having low expectations that the legislation would tamp down the tendency of banks to find loopholes and raise consumer rates.  Actually, it worked, and benefitted the banks as well.   


It's cool when that type of innovation happens through, of all things, a regulation.   ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

99 Quotes on The Future of Innovation

http://blogs.sap.com/innovation/ - Business Innovation is the key ingredient for growth.



Related post by Deb:
    

Beyond Resilience: Givers, Takers, Matchers and Anti-Fragile Systems

    

Choices for High Performance Teams, Groups and Psuedo-Teams: Achievement Is How You Say It!
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

From SAP, useful nuggets to consider trends and change, business design change.  ~  Deb

more...
David Hain's curator insight, October 19, 2013 2:52 AM

Some fascinating facts on the world we live in now and how it is predicted to change.

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Why Steve Jobs Never Listened to His Customers - Sheltered Innovation and Crowdsourcing

Why Steve Jobs Never Listened to His Customers  - Sheltered Innovation and Crowdsourcing | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Does innovation require listening to your customers? Or is to better to ignore them?  "It's really hard to design products by focus groups. A lot of times, people don't know what they want until you show it to them."— Steve Jobs    Also:  What worked for Steve Jobs may not work for your company.

    

The Benefits of Sheltered Innovation


Multiple studies have shown that individuals have a tendency to produce the most novel ideas when working alone (as opposed to crowdsourcing ideas from an external group).


  • But can this focus on the internal creativity of teams really have a place in the business world?

  • Should customers be ignored?


According to Mario D’Amico, senior VP of marketing at Cirque du Soleil, the answer is, well, maybe.


...was Jobs right or not?

Many respected entrepreneurs would say that yes, he was right ... but only for theextremely unconventional and circumstantial situation that his company was in.


...understanding your customers’ wants is a pivotal part of growing your business—but doesn’t have to restrict your innovation.


Read more:   https://www.helpscout.net/blog/why-steve-jobs-never-listened-to-his-customers/


Related posts by Deb:


                  




Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

The Wisdom of Crowds has individual and collective component, when you dig down deep.  The JCPenney example cited in this story is also a good cautionary tale.  ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Change Leadership Watch
Scoop.it!

World for What It Is, or What It Could Be? Elon Musk, Tesla Motors

World for What It Is, or What It Could Be? Elon Musk, Tesla Motors | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

We need people who can execute ...including mastering acceleration.


Elon Musk

Recently featured in a Wall Street Journal article, Musk is compared to Steve Jobs, another visionary, and is then discussed as follows:


Elon Musks's ambitions soar even higher...


His electric-car company Tesla Motors aims to remake the way we drive, while the ultimate goal of his rocket company SpaceX, he said, is to travel to Mars and help build a self-sustaining base there.


______________________

We need people who can execute. Too often people jump ship before they see an idea through...

______________________


Skepticism?  ...each time Mr. Musk delivers a better, less-expensive electric car or launches another rocket successfully, he proves his doubters wrong.


...he co-founded a multibillion-dollar company called PayPal.


...Musk...taught himself to code and program software by the age of 12.


After ...leaving a PhD program at Stanford, Musk dedicated himself to the three important problems that would most affect the future of humanity.  "One was the internet, one was clean energy, and one was space."


All three are revolutionary spaces, and to work in all three most certainly requires an individual willing to completely reinvent himself and his expertise to change course as needed.


We need people who can execute. Too often people jump ship before they see an idea through and don't even begin to master the competency of acceleration before they are onto the next thing.


Related posts from Deb:

     



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Originally posted on my Change Leadership Watch stream, it also is highly instructive to the innovation theme, especially with the lessons of staying-the-course with the new idea and execution.  ~ Deb

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, July 10, 2013 11:01 AM

The Tesla story has elements of sensing the future that can be instructive for anyone in a change space including innovation.  ~  D

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

The Limits of Big Data in the Big City

The Limits of Big Data in the Big City | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Why high-tech “solutions” can’t solve many of our most pressing urban problems.  ...and what did work for complex city issue.


...many problems require a decidedly different approach. Take the seven-acre site in Lower Manhattan called the Seward Park Urban Renewal Area, where 1,000 mixed-income apartments are set to rise. A working-class neighborhood that fell to bulldozers in 1969, it stayed bare as co-ops nearby filled with affluent families...


In 2010, with the city ready to invite developers to bid for the site, long-simmering tensions between nearby public-housing tenants and wealthier dwellers like me turned suddenly — well, civil.


_____________________________

“So those who couldn’t be there had their voices considered and those who were there could see them up on a screen and adopted, modified or rejected.”

_____________________________

   


What changed? Was it some multimillion-dollar “open democracy” platform from Cisco, or a Big Data program to suss out the community’s real priorities? Nope.


According to Dominic Pisciotta Berg, then the chairman of the local community board, it was plain old e-mail, and the dialogue it facilitated.


“We simply set up an e-mail box dedicated to receiving e-mail comments” on the renewal project, and organizers would then “pull them together by comment type and then consolidate them for display during the meetings,” he said. “So those who couldn’t be there had their voices considered and those who were there could see them up on a screen and adopted, modified or rejected.”


Through e-mail conversations, neighbors articulated priorities — permanently affordable homes, a movie theater, protections for small merchants — that even a supercomputer wouldn’t necessarily have identified in the data.


Related posts by Deb:

  


 



Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Even for a tech-lover like me, when low-tech works in supporting rich, positive conversation and change, I'm all for it and will certainly share it.  I love to say, "it's the conversation, baby!"  

There are good examples here on "the answers that make cities run more smoothly only inadvertently end up being the ones that make cities run more equitably." ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

The Tipping Point between Structure & Innovation

The Tipping Point between Structure & Innovation | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Somewhere between the two extremes exists a tipping point – a place where full creativity and the lack of structure reaches a balance with purposeful, valuable and necessary structures and processes."


____________________

Balancing structure and freedom, processes and creativity is an art, not a science.  ____________________

Move much more toward additional structure and you begin to limit and stifle creativity and innovation outcomes. 


Move much more toward freedom and creativity and you lose the ability to manage, develop and commercialize ideas. Where does the tipping point reside?


Your innovation activities need enough structure to identify and commercialize great ideas effectively, but not so much structure that people are stymied or slowed by processes, forms and decisions. 


In organizations where purposeful innovation is fairly new, the tipping point is closer to the regimented side, since there are few widely distributed capabilities or tools. As an organization gains experience innovating, the structure and rigidity become less important, as innate skills and culture learn to shape and manage ideas more effectively.


Related posts by Deb:



   
Photo:  by lambdachialpha Flickr CC
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's the art of deciding how to get the balance right: SO MANY businesses along with newbie or ill-informed managers stifle creativity, resulting in rampant mediocrity, morale problems and talent loss. Turn it around from victim, persecutor roles to encourager, challenger, collaborator, coach of your innovators.  ~  D

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

The Nature of the Future – Review | Harold Jarche

The Nature of the Future – Review | Harold Jarche | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Marina Gorbis identifies unique human skills [that] should be the core of any public education program.


  • Sensemaking
  • Social and emotional intelligence
  • Novel and adaptive thinking
  • Moral and ethical reasoning


As Gorbis write... “Learning is Social”.


We need to learn how to work better with machines, letting machines do what they are good at.


Gorbis shows how machines and average people can outperform experts at playing chess. 


“Weak human + machine + better process

was superior to a strong computer alone

and, more remarkably,superior to a

strong human + machine + inferior process.

Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

It's not just the skills, it's the social and the process, lest all the talk about MOOCs and universities and skill training lead to engineering and accounting.  ~  Deb

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, April 26, 2013 2:39 PM

Sensemaking of MOOCs and adaptive learning.  Trust a smart process.  ~ Deb

Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from New Work, New Livelihood, Careers
Scoop.it!

Be Constructive—Not Invasive—With Big Data, The WSJ Experts Stream

Be Constructive—Not Invasive—With Big Data, The WSJ Experts Stream | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Two perspectives:  1) ...the real risk in a hyper-data world is use that crosses the line between constructive and invasive, and 2) that people will use it naively, and to mistake correlation.

   

Angela Ahrendts:  The security dimensions of Big Data are well rehearsed, and protection must be a given. ...the real risk in a hyper-data world is use that crosses the line between constructive and invasive.

  

For us, Big Data must be about serving our customers’ interests, rather than our own.

      

….Customer information should work for the customer, making every retail experience a great retail experience...    Appropriately protected and intelligently used, we believe it can do just that.

  

Angela Ahrendts (@AngelaAhrendts) is the CEO of Burberry.


____________________

Figuring out what causes what, and why and under what circumstances is hard work. Big Data is a tool for this work, not a substitute for it.

____________________


Andrew McAfee:  ... Big data’s great promise is that it’ll get us out of ....decision-making by HiPPO—the Highest-Paid Person’s Opinion. ... In the same way that witch doctors gave way to actual doctors as medicine became a science, HiPPOs will in many domains give way to data-driven decision making.


Many people accurately perceive that Big Data will give rise to privacy concerns, but I want to highlight a different risk:


  • That people will use it naively, and to mistake correlation (“as the geese fly away, the weather gets colder”) with causation (“the geese are causing winter!”). Figuring out what causes what, and why and under what circumstances is hard work. Big Data is a tool for this work, not a substitute for it.


Andrew McAfee ( @amcafee ), a principal research scientist at Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the co-author of the e-book “Race Against the Machine: How the Digital Revolution is Accelerating Innovation, Driving Productivity, and Irreversibly Transforming Employment and the Economy.”



Recent posts by Deb:  

  


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

I've already received a comment on my LinkedIn stream about the invasiveness of big data and employee email.  Here's two more perspectives on using Big Data well.  ~  D

more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, November 25, 2013 10:41 AM

This article from this past April offers a way to see beyond the "shiny new toy" syndrome of the Big Data buzzwords, to help it be the tool it's meant to be.  ~  Deb

Scooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Scoop.it!

Where and When does Big Make Sense?

Where and When does Big Make Sense? | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"An insider's view of the advance readers' edition of The End of Big: How the Internet Makes David the New Goliath by the super-smart Nicco Mele."

The book releases here in the U.S. on April 23, 2013. 


We are all struggling to figure out which big institutions make sense....And ...which are best torn down.


....While there are many exciting aspects of the end of big, ...there are also threats.   ....The rise of fringe groups such as the Tea Party and WikiLeaks are a result of the end of big because the Web rewards extremist views.


____________________

Without the Washington Post, would Woodward and Bernstein have emerged independently?

____________________


In journalism, if we no longer have big news gathering organizations, who is going to fund the big investigative story?


Without the Washington Post, would Woodward and Bernstein have emerged independently? Without the Watergate Scandal how would history have differed? These are questions worth asking.


The End of Big was not self-published. Nicco talks a lot about micro publishing but went with a big publisher (St. Martin's Press) for his own book.


But at the same time, Nicco is running EchoDitto his own small business and he also has a small publishing operation (his blog). 


Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

A thoughtful post, a 2013 book that provokes new perspectives on "right-sizing"economics and culture in an environment with volatile markets. ~  Deb

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from Agile Learning
Scoop.it!

The Professors, Yes, the MOOC Hype is Worth It: Disruption in Higher Ed

The Professors, Yes, the MOOC Hype is Worth It:  Disruption in Higher Ed | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

Professors were asked, do they believe MOOCs "are worth the hype." 79% said yes.


===


In the largest survey of instructors who have taught massive open online courses, The Chronicle heard from critics, converts, and the cautious.

 

Hype around these new free online courses has grown louder and louder since a few professors at Stanford University drew hundreds of thousands of students to online computer-science courses in 2011.


Since then MOOCs, which charge no tuition and are open to anybody with Internet access, have been touted by reformers as a way to transform higher education and expand college access.


Many professors teaching MOOCs had a similarly positive outlook: Asked whether they believe MOOCs "are worth the hype," 79 percent said yes.


Via Smithstorian, Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Related posts by Deb:


      
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 18, 2013 12:40 PM

There is some synchroncity here that this article is showing up while I'm listening to a professor at UM talk about Harvard choosing a MOOC for accounting for their entry level accounting (Brigham Young) and outsourcing professors.

Can paths to efficiency and worker health co-exist?

Professor:  Wally Hopp, Associate Dean for Faculty and Research Herrick Professor of Manufacturing, Ross School of Business   Positively Lean: A Path to Efficiency and Energization?


Examples:  Henry Ford, Joe at GM Powertrain, FelPro (300% ROI on Employee Benefits, no turnover > sold to Federal Mogul)


Key themes in the blend:

  • Share the gain
  • Appeal to pride
  • Cultivate a community
  • Pursue a higher purpose <motivation>  (Sugar water or change the world)

 

Apple >> Change the world

Patagonia  >> Corporate responsibility  (Don't buy what you don't need)
University of Michigan  Uncommon education for the common man  (President James Burrill Angell) 


Questions:

  • Is the key challenge aligning organization & employee benefits from efficiency gains?
  • Or is it cultivating a sense of higher purpose?
  • Or something completely different?    
Rescooped by Deb Nystrom, REVELN from TRENDS IN HIGHER EDUCATION
Scoop.it!

6 Emerging Technologies in Higher Education

6 Emerging Technologies in Higher Education | Innovation & Institutions, Will it Blend? | Scoop.it

"Six (6) emerging technologies are identified across three adoption horizons over the next one to five years."


The work is by the NMC Horizon Project, a decade-long research project designed to identify and describe emerging technologies likely to have an impact on learning, teaching, and creative inquiry in higher education.


Trends included in the short list of major changes in higher education include:

  • Flipped Classroom, 
  • MOOCs, Mobile Apps, 
  • Tablet Computing, 
  • Augmented Reality, 
  • Game-Based Learning, 
  • The Internet of Things, 
  • Learning Analytics, 
  • 3D Printing, 
  • Flexible Displays, 
  • Next Generation Batteries, 
  • Wearable Technology.  


The NMC Horizon Report: 2013 Higher Education Edition is a collaborative effort between the New Media Consortium and the EDUCAUSE Learning Initiative (ELI), an EDUCAUSE Program.


Related posts by Deb via REVELN:


   



Via Alberto Acereda, Ph.D.
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's insight:

Academe is one of the biggest, most obvious targets of disruptive innovation, and on-the-job education is an aspect of it, via the previous post by Christensen.  Here's what Educause has to say about it.  See my Social, peer learning & curation stream to learn about "Peer Learning Circles."  ~  D

more...