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Building Innovation Capital
Innovation covers much, we need to open our thinking to explore all its possibilities in approach, geography, activity or challenge. I will keep 'grabbing' those that seem interesting to explore and reflect upon- seeking the value
Curated by Paul Hobcraft
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Why Transformation Needs a Second Chapter

Why Transformation Needs a Second Chapter | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Many corporate-transformation efforts fail to deliver lasting competitive advantage. BCG has identified the factors that lead to successful transformations - and the common traps that characterize failures.

 


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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, April 19, 3:05 PM

BCG has identified eight factors that drive long-term success:


  • Turning the Page. Companies make a conscious decision to go beyond the efficiency moves of chapter one and refocus on growth and innovation. 

  • Creating a New Vision. Companies articulate a clear shift in strategic direction, coupled with room for experimentation. 

  • Foundational Innovation. They innovate across multiple dimensions of the business model, not just in products and processes. 

  • Commitment. There is persistence from leaders in the face of inevitable setbacks and internal opposition to unproven shifts in strategy. 

  • Imposed Distance. There is a willingness to shift from the historical core business model and its underlying assumptions, often by creating a deliberate degree of separation between the new business model and legacy operations. 

  • Adaptive Approach. Transformation unfolds through trial and error, with ongoing refinement of a flexible plan. 

  • Shots on Goal. Companies do not pin growth hopes on a single move but rather on deploying a portfolio of moves to drive growth. 

  • Patience. There is adherence to the vision over a multiyear period.
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How Financial Metrics Kill Great Ideas

How Financial Metrics Kill Great Ideas | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it
How you can overcome your training to create great innovations.

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How Content Curation Informs Content Creation

How Content Curation Informs Content Creation | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

If you are actively curating content as a business strategy, you are sitting on a great source of guidance to help you pick good topics. Of course you’ll monitor success of your own content over time. But there’s more. You should keep tabs on a wider range of content to expand your purview.


Via Guillaume Decugis
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M. Philip Oliver's curator insight, October 30, 2014 9:43 PM

Thanks Guillaume Decugis

Barbara Vermaas's curator insight, October 31, 2014 5:43 AM

Content curation is de 1e stap; dit geeft inzicht in wat er al beschikbaar is, en vooral, in wat er nog nodig is. En dus: geeft inzicht op welk gebied je content creation zou kunnen/moeten inzetten.

Dawn Matheson's curator insight, October 31, 2014 10:50 AM

We hear the term a lot - content curation. What is it, and how does it differ from social sharing in general.

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Future of Work
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Future of Work: Culture

The explosion of new technologies, mass adoption of social channels, ubiquity of mobile and connectivity, and proliferation of devices continue to drive massive transformation, but at what cost? How can large organizations collaborate, integrate, and innovate quickly enough to survive at the speed of their customers? What are the questions we could or should be asking to really make changes for work that make sense?


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Defining Strategy, Implementation, and Execution

Defining Strategy, Implementation, and Execution | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

It is striking how much confusion there is between strategy, implementation, and execution. Is “strategy” a matter of making choices about where we want to go, where we play and how we win, of setting goals and actions, about how we create and capture economic value over time? Does it include creating solutions to unforeseen problems and running with unexpected opportunities? Is “getting things done” what we mean by implementation or execution? Do you “execute” or “implement” a strategy? And can you separate these from strategy formation?
For strategy wonks like me, thinking about the definitions of these ideas provides endless fascination. For many business leaders, however, I find that the semantics matter a lot less. And that’s too bad because the semantics should matter. There are meaningful distinctions between strategy, implementation, and execution that are helpful to running a company or business in the real world. Ignoring, blurring, or getting them wrong creates sloppy thinking, deciding, and doing at all levels of an organization.


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Moving Innovation into our Core - Part Two

Moving Innovation into our Core - Part Two | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

A three-part series on rethinking the management of the innovation system.

Part two, recognizing the broken process we currently have.

The innovation process and the structures build into our organization certainly need to be changed.

I outline here different barriers that require change to bring innovation more into the core of a business.

Today, we are needing to build greater agility and responsiveness into our innovation design to counter for a more rapidly  changing market, sensing changing conditions and to ‘seize’ breaking opportunities. . A new combination of speed, flexibility, networking and focusing on adapting and fusing the skills and capabilities needed, will require changes in our innovation work.


Via Edouard Siekierski, Gisele HELOU
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Becoming More Innovative in 2015: Innovation Resolutions

Becoming More Innovative in 2015: Innovation Resolutions | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it
What are you going to do this coming year to be more innovative?

Via Alexander Crépin, The Future Shapers
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The Future Shapers's curator insight, March 27, 3:32 AM

Leaders - what are you doing this year to drive innovation?

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Is Your Leadership Style Right for the Digital Age?

Is Your Leadership Style Right for the Digital Age? | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Advancement in digital technologies has disrupted everything, including leadership styles.

 

Employees want more ownership rather than to follow instruction; customers want to participate in the marketing and development process; and leaders are finding that open and agile organizations are able to maneuver more effectively than organizations where all insight and direction comes from the top. In short, the autocratic Commander, whether brilliant or misguided, just won’t cut it anymore.


 


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Becky Willmoth's curator insight, February 20, 6:08 AM

Within this article four leadership styles are discussed, with a place advocated for each. However in the digital age, the co-creator is the most desirable and rarest of the leadership styles described. Desirable as she or he generates more innovation, growth and profit. Rare as the capabilities required of this leader are complex and borne of authenticity and trust, with a preference for eco, rather than ego, systems.


To support the evolution of the co-creator, leadership development approaches should enable leaders to create broad and diverse networks, encourage them to bridge (or remove) boundaries, offer a space to relinquish control and the desire to create shared value. 

june holley's curator insight, February 20, 7:10 AM

Even though this is directed at businesses, it shows how we are moving to a network age where people want to be part of engaged networks. How do we shift our ideas about leadership to support this larger shift?. 

Shannon Banks's curator insight, February 22, 5:29 PM

Top-down leadership is no longer viable in the digital age. This article gives great context for technological reasons behind this shift.

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Agility Is Within Reach

Agility Is Within Reach | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Many corporate leaders think their companies are agile. Surely, they assume, we possess that combination of speed, flexibility, nimbleness, and responsiveness that will enable us to turn on a dime as circumstances warrant. It often comes as a surprise, then, when a significant opportunity or challenge arises and the company can’t deliver.

 

What these leaders realize too late is that they are thinking about agility in a counterproductive way. In their view, agility is an end in itself, instead of a means to a more important end - sustainable competitive advantage.

 


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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, March 17, 6:24 AM

In PwC’s latest CEO study, more than half of CEOs surveyed said they believe they will be competing in new sectors in the next three years, and 60 percent said they see more business opportunities now than they did three years ago. But almost three-quarters of respondents expressed concern that their companies lack the skills needed to meet future competitive threats. In these conditions, agility is critical.


With strategic responsiveness and organizational flexibility, you can move quickly when your industry changes.

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Patterns of Disruption and the Great Transformation

Patterns of Disruption and the Great Transformation | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

The economy is experiencing successive waves of change in industry after industry. It is important to understand the common themes behind these changes and have a model that helps executives anticipate and manage the impact of disruption or to devise disruptive strategies. 


Via Becky Willmoth
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Becky Willmoth's curator insight, February 18, 11:01 AM

Within this excellent blog piece, Haydn Shaughnessy neatly summarises the main perspectives on patterns of business disruption. The piece then knits aspects of these perspectives together to outline a five step process that leads to structural disruption that affects all firms in a sector:


  1. Concentration and hubris. The consolidation of market structure into an oligopoly, with satisfactory margins, but often accompanied by the growth of hubristic management.
  2. The experimental era. Employees of existing oligopolists leaving to create their own companies because of dissatisfaction with how their innovative mindset is treated.
  3. The new content layer. The growth of awareness, or a new content layer or changed information market, as consumers experience alternatives to oligopoly offers, often as co-creators or participants.
  4. Ecosystem consolidation. The consolidation of a durable start-up community with continuity of personnel and objectives over time.
  5. Platform and price. The arrival of a platform company as an organising hub for a new industry, intensifies horizontal pressure on a whole sector and triggers multiple random adjacencies as platform providers can choose their ground. 
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History of Design Thinking at SAP - SAP User Experience Community

History of Design Thinking at SAP - SAP User Experience Community | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it
Design Thinking has a strong history at SAP that started in 2004 and continues today. Here is the Design Thinking journey! Watch the video and let us know

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The Cynefin Framework: Using the Most Appropriate Problem-Solving Process

The Cynefin Framework: Using the Most Appropriate Problem-Solving Process | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

The most effective leaders understand that problem solving is not a "one-size-fits-all" process. They know that their actions depend on the situation, and they make better decisions by adapting their approach to changing circumstances.

 

But how do you know which approach you should use in a particular situation? And how can you avoid making the wrong decision?

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Mike Donahue's curator insight, February 16, 10:19 AM

This framework provides guidance to solving different problems in different ways rather than approaching all problems with the same process. The article provides some simple but clear examples of how to know which situation you're in and how to proceed.

Daniel Egger's curator insight, March 15, 4:00 PM

Cynefim is all about understanding your context. It divides the logic of the present situation in obvious, complicated, complex or chaotic. There exit many possible ways to excel in innovation, futuring and strategy. Still, strategy is often obvious, especially when you link monetary rewards with execution. Innovation was adapted by the market as complicated (sense, analyze and respond). And Futuring is by definition complex, and we can fully understand it only when it arrives. The interesting aspects in that observation is that organizations have to work all three dimensions - obvious, complicated and complex to guarantee sustainable value generation over time. We need integration.

 

However, the categorization of Strategy, Innovation and Futuring represent only their initial states and different methods, methodologies and tools exist to alter their dimension in the Cynefim Model. The Framework is rich, inspiring and most importantly helps you to increase the awareness about the initial situation and what challenges lie ahead. 

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, March 26, 8:47 AM

Some things are worth having others are worth keeping.

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The Best Time To Post on Each Social Media Platform

The Best Time To Post on Each Social Media Platform | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

This infographic from SurePayroll, illustrates peak times and guidelines for Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, Pinterest, Tumblr, and Google +. They are all different, but what most share in common is to avoid posting early morning on the weekends, or after 3 pm on Fridays. Start posting at the right time, to get the best results....


Via Jeff Domansky
Paul Hobcraft's insight:

Nice to have a certain confirmation of best and worst timings

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, February 8, 11:33 PM

More suggestions on when to post for best results on the major social media channels.

Ayongshop Ayong's curator insight, February 9, 7:19 AM

http://cafeliquidsex.blogspot.com/

Sally Gunn's curator insight, February 16, 11:52 PM

These guides are always helpful but please don't forget to look at your own analytics and see when your customers are engaging with you most.

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Mixed Signals: Why People Misunderstand Each Other

Mixed Signals: Why People Misunderstand Each Other | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

The psychological quirks that make it tricky to get an accurate read on someone's emotions.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, April 24, 1:29 PM

People who are easy to judge — people who send clear signals to others are, researchers have found, ultimately happier and more satisfied with their relationships, careers, and lives than those who are more difficult to read. It’s easy to understand why: Feeling understood is a basic human need. When people satisfy that need, they feel more at peace with themselves and with the people around them, who see them closer to how they see themselves.


Dr. J.L. Harter's curator insight, April 25, 10:25 PM

Assumption based on perception can skew reality.  Understanding intention, perception and assumption is key to changing interactions potentially from negative to positive. 

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Curation & The Future of Publishing
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How Content Curation Informs Content Creation

How Content Curation Informs Content Creation | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

If you are actively curating content as a business strategy, you are sitting on a great source of guidance to help you pick good topics. Of course you’ll monitor success of your own content over time. But there’s more. You should keep tabs on a wider range of content to expand your purview.


Via Guillaume Decugis
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M. Philip Oliver's curator insight, October 30, 2014 9:43 PM

Thanks Guillaume Decugis

Barbara Vermaas's curator insight, October 31, 2014 5:43 AM

Content curation is de 1e stap; dit geeft inzicht in wat er al beschikbaar is, en vooral, in wat er nog nodig is. En dus: geeft inzicht op welk gebied je content creation zou kunnen/moeten inzetten.

Dawn Matheson's curator insight, October 31, 2014 10:50 AM

We hear the term a lot - content curation. What is it, and how does it differ from social sharing in general.

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Future of Work
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From Looking Digital to Being Digital: The Impact of Technology on the Future of Work

Companies are finding it challenging to capture the full value of revolutionary breakthroughs in digital technology. Many have used digital technology to drive down costs and become more efficient, which is akin to “looking digital,” an important but surface-level change. Some, however, are taking things further and transforming data into new revenue and new sources of value.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, March 9, 9:05 PM

To move from looking digital to being digital, companies must engage in a deep shift in the way they do business. For business leaders, that shift requires as much attention to culture and organization as it does to the technology itself.


Gary Bamford's curator insight, March 12, 2:45 AM

The future is agile not orange....

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The Hierarchy of Needs for Employee Engagement

The Hierarchy of Needs for Employee Engagement | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

“How do Maslow's hierarchy of needs translate to employee engagement? Learn how survival, job security, belonging, importance and self-actualisation matter.”


Via Richard Meyer, Atisy Joëlle, Mark E. Deschaine Ph.D., Suvi Salo
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Lingua Digitalis's curator insight, April 1, 4:11 AM

This is an effective visualisation - and a good starting point to realise that communication is a key aspect to enable employees to move towards the top!

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Moving innovation into our Core - Part One

Moving innovation into our Core - Part One | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Innovation has sat outside the core of organizations central systems for long enough. Arguably this lack of being a core central focus holds the deeper understanding of innovation back.

A core that could offer up the sustaining value and contribution innovation can make, into the growth and future well-being of organizations and having available the level of resources and commitments it needs. Today innovation seems to be falling short in delivering on its promise. Why?


Via Edouard Siekierski, Gisele HELOU
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Moving innovation into our core - Part three

Moving innovation into our core -  Part three | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Moving innovation into the core of our business – the third and final part of this  series on rethinking the management of the innovation system.

Part three- .Technology will drive innovation change

We are in need of a different “sustaining” capacity build around innovation as its continuous core, constantly evolving, adapting, learning and adjusting, in perpetual motion.

We are heading for transformational change

Digital technology is offering a radically different conduit to achieve this very different engagement process. Innovation is going to be very caught up in this transformational change.

Technology and data will be innovation’s catalyst of change, it will shape us in powerfully new ways


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The Cynefin Framework: Using the Most Appropriate Problem-Solving Process

The Cynefin Framework: Using the Most Appropriate Problem-Solving Process | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

The most effective leaders understand that problem solving is not a "one-size-fits-all" process. They know that their actions depend on the situation, and they make better decisions by adapting their approach to changing circumstances.

 

But how do you know which approach you should use in a particular situation? And how can you avoid making the wrong decision?

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
Mike Donahue's curator insight, February 16, 10:19 AM

This framework provides guidance to solving different problems in different ways rather than approaching all problems with the same process. The article provides some simple but clear examples of how to know which situation you're in and how to proceed.

Daniel Egger's curator insight, March 15, 4:00 PM

Cynefim is all about understanding your context. It divides the logic of the present situation in obvious, complicated, complex or chaotic. There exit many possible ways to excel in innovation, futuring and strategy. Still, strategy is often obvious, especially when you link monetary rewards with execution. Innovation was adapted by the market as complicated (sense, analyze and respond). And Futuring is by definition complex, and we can fully understand it only when it arrives. The interesting aspects in that observation is that organizations have to work all three dimensions - obvious, complicated and complex to guarantee sustainable value generation over time. We need integration.

 

However, the categorization of Strategy, Innovation and Futuring represent only their initial states and different methods, methodologies and tools exist to alter their dimension in the Cynefim Model. The Framework is rich, inspiring and most importantly helps you to increase the awareness about the initial situation and what challenges lie ahead. 

Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, March 26, 8:47 AM

Some things are worth having others are worth keeping.

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Shifting to more people-focused management styles

Shifting to more people-focused management styles | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Business is broken, with engagement and trust at an all-time low. A radically different way of thinking and acting, which focuses on people as the source of value, is needed. 



Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, February 11, 8:15 AM

El Cambio de la Gestión: como aprovechar el poder de la gente...Shifting to more people-focused management styles | @scoopit via @LeadershipABC http://sco.lt/...

David Hain's curator insight, February 12, 7:16 AM

We need to create human workplaces!

Prof. Hankell's curator insight, February 12, 9:26 AM

 Two of the main barriers to a lasting and effective leadership transformation are compartmentalization – treating ‘the people side’ as separate from strategy and cost control – and command and control mindsets, which often persist after a nominal shift towards empowerment has been made. 

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10 Principles of Organization Design

10 Principles of Organization Design | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

 In the 18th annual PwC survey of chief executive officers, conducted in 2014, many CEOs anticipated significant disruptions to their businesses during the next five years as a result of external worldwide trends. One such trend, cited by 61 percent of the respondents, was an increasing number of competitors. The same number of respondents foresaw changes in customer behavior creating disruption. Fifty percent said they expected changes in distribution channels. As CEOs look to stay ahead of these trends, they recognize the need to change the organization’s design. But for that redesign to be successful, a company must make its changes as effectively and painlessly as possible, in a way that aligns with its strategy, invigorates employees, builds distinctive new capabilities, and makes it easier to attract customers.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, March 23, 9:33 PM

These fundamental guidelines, drawn from experience, can help you reshape your organization to fit your business strategy.


Steve Bax's curator insight, March 24, 6:00 AM

This is a very topical, well written piece on the ongoing issues of organisational structure design. The principles are sound and resonate with previous theorists such as Lewin, Deal and Kennedy. There are some good examples and strong recommendations for what NOT to do too. The comments on benchmarking are particularly relevant for many organisations seeking to establish their own position in the marketplace. Another key message is to let go of the past. Leaders need to build on strengths - formal or informal - and look ahead.

Karen Silins's curator insight, March 25, 11:53 AM

Nice list of elements in organizational design.

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Applying design thinking across the business: An interview with Citrix’s Catherine Courage | McKinsey & Company

Applying design thinking across the business: An interview with Citrix’s Catherine Courage | McKinsey & Company | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it
Catherine Courage champions user-centered design—not only for the benefit of the software company’s customers but also for its employees. A McKinsey & Company article.

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The Four Lenses of Innovation by Rowan Gibson

The Four Lenses of Innovation by Rowan Gibson | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it
Every now and then, a book comes along that completely surprises me in terms of my own reactions to it, forcing me to unglue some of my preconceived ideas, and then stick them back together again i...

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16 Ways Your Brain Is Sabotaging Your Effort To Learn

16 Ways Your Brain Is Sabotaging Your Effort To Learn | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Our own brains regularly deceive us in order to make sense of the world we live in. Most of the time, it’s nothing more than an innocent effort to save face. Our brain will tell us we’re smarter and better looking than everyone else, and that any fault brought to our attention should probably be blamed on someone else. It will advocate for our convictions, pointing out any evidence that supports them and politely ignoring any that doesn’t. And it will even spare us from the mental strain of thinking beyond the stereotypes it has so conveniently crafted for us. The human brain is our best friend, and our worst enemy, and unless we keep one eye peeled, it can hijack our learning completely.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, February 12, 11:51 PM

In this article Saga Briggs examines some of the “traps” the brain sets for us during the course of our careers, and what we can do to avoid them. Psychologists have already done the hard work of realising there’s any hijacking going on at all; what’s left for us to do is pay attention. 



David Hain's curator insight, February 13, 12:21 PM

Understand your brain (and others) to develop real leverage in 21C jobs.