Building Innovati...
Follow
Find
415 views | +1 today
 
Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from The Jazz of Innovation
onto Building Innovation Capital
Scoop.it!

Understanding the dynamics within your innovation system

Understanding the dynamics within your innovation system | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

The work of David Teece is hugely influential on exploring dynamic capabilities. It was my reading of one of his early papers, published in 1997 (with Gary Pisano and Amy Shuen) that got me started down the dynamics path and my quest to identify the innovation landscape required by each organization to become innovation fit.

 


Via Peter Verschuere
Paul Hobcraft's insight:

Pleased this was scooped and proud to share on my own scoop page

more...
No comment yet.
Building Innovation Capital
Innovation covers much, we need to open our thinking to explore all its possibilities in approach, geography, activity or challenge. I will keep 'grabbing' those that seem interesting to explore and reflect upon- seeking the value
Curated by Paul Hobcraft
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Change Management Resources
Scoop.it!

What VUCA Really Means for You, Getting Prepared and Agile with It

What VUCA Really Means for You, Getting Prepared and Agile with It | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

VUCA, short for volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity, and a catchall for “Hey, it’s crazy out there!”    It’s also misleading: VUCA conflates four distinct types of challenges that demand four distinct types of responses. That makes it difficult to know how to approach a challenging situation and easy to use VUCA as a crutch, a way to throw off the hard work of strategy and planning—after all, you can’t prepare for a VUCA world, right?
 

Actually, you can. Here is a guide to identifying, getting ready for, and responding to events in each of the four VUCA categories.

Authors:  Nathan Bennett and G. James Lemoine

Related posts by Deb:

      

Three Tenets of Mastering the Unknown, Leadership through Ambiguity

     

6 Steps Beyond Industrial Age Performance Appraisals    Think like an Entrepreneur: Be Anti-Fragile No Matter Where You Work

 

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, September 1, 10:52 AM

VUCA is a term from the military, put into popular use by futurist Bob Johansen in 2010, as mentioned in his book, now in a its second edition,  Leaders Make the Future: Ten New Leadership Skills for an Uncertain World.  The quadrant model depicted, by authors  is handy for thinking through what you can learn and do to be fully prepared and agile enough for this VUCA world.  ~  Deb

Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, September 7, 8:31 AM

The world of work is increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. As a result it is time to view surprises as the new normal and steady state as the exception. The difference over the past decade is the increasing speed at which leaders need to address multiple challenges, often at the same time.

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from APRENDIZAJE
Scoop.it!

Bloom's revised Taxonomy with verbs!

Bloom's revised Taxonomy with verbs! | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it
  Need some extra verbs? Here you go!           ~Mia

Via Marta Torán
Paul Hobcraft's insight:

Nice way of presenting this- could work for lots of different prompters

more...
Stephanie Moreau's curator insight, July 23, 3:15 AM

Beau et utile pour affiner vos objectifs !

Narayanan Kulathuramaiyer's curator insight, July 31, 4:52 PM

Nice graphic of Blooms

Ryan Sines's curator insight, September 2, 1:08 PM

Visual reminder to ask high order thinking questions and tasks of students.

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Knowledge Management
Scoop.it!

The Future Of Jobs: The Onrushing Wave

The Future Of Jobs: The Onrushing Wave | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Previous technological innovation has always...


Via John Hovell
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Knowledge Management
Scoop.it!

Appreciative Inquiry and Knowledge Management? No problem.

Appreciative Inquiry and Knowledge Management?  No problem. | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

It’s only in the last few years that I’ve come to appreciate(!) the connections between my world of KM and organizational learning, and the philosophical mindset which underpins Appreciative Inqui...


Via John Hovell
more...
Julie Ekner Koch's curator insight, May 28, 6:23 AM

The shift from asking what is not working (performance orientation) to what is working in the organization (appreciative inquiry).

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Knowledge Management
Scoop.it!

Moving Beyond E-Learning: The new mindset for Learning in the Modern Workplace

Moving Beyond E-Learning: The new mindset for Learning in the Modern Workplace | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Learning has long been defined as “knowledge and skills acquired through studying or being taught”. However, as learning animals we can’t help but learn! As children we learned instinctively from o...


Via John Hovell
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Knowledge Broker
Scoop.it!

Communication, Knowledge and Information in the Human Ecosystem

Communication, Knowledge and Information in the Human Ecosystem | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

In the Digital Age, the age of Communication, Information and Knowledge, the possibility to capture, express, observe, visualize and understand the patterns for behaviour, emotion, opinion, expression, movement and more, potentially for hundreds of millions of people at a time, has brought the term “ethnography” in the spotlight for both academic and popular crowds.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, August 1, 3:09 PM

In the 2 1/2 years that I've been curation, I haven't come across an article that I didn't quite know how to capture. It is a challenging read, but there are some interesting ideas about awareness of one’s position within a relational ecosystem.

Lis Marrow's curator insight, August 5, 7:40 PM

again....thanks for helping!

Eli Levine's curator insight, August 23, 10:15 AM

All is perspective.  We each and all have different interpretations of the reality that is around us, because we each and all have different brains and sense organs which pick up and interpret the reality that is around us.

 

Some opinions and beliefs, however, are more accurately sensing the real world than others.  Furthermore, the only appropriate way to pursue information and data about the real world is to be like an interrogator, seeking the truth, and a gold prospector, panning for the valuable and relevant information in your given area.  It's when there is open communication, honest dialogue, and a spirit of cooperation that we get the end results that are useful to us, as policy makers, and as social scientists, trying to uncover the truth about our world.  All other perspectives, attitudes, and methods, are most likely bunk and produce bunk relative to our common reality.

 

Reality is a dictatorship.  It simply is and does not care what you think feel, believe, or hope for.  You only obey it, or you die.  That's my new insight into the world.  Screw post-modernism.

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Network Leadership
Scoop.it!

Social Technology and the Changing Context of Leadership

Social Technology and the Changing Context of Leadership | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Social technologies with their inherent democratic, anti-hierarchical quality easily transcend internal and external boundaries, suddenly creating a powerful thrust for horizontal collaboration and participation. They give each and every member of an organization a creative voice and enable real-time virtual connectivity in a way we have never seen before. This makes them a great catalyst for the organizational principles that are required by the new leadership context of the 21st century.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, june holley
more...
Donna Karlin's curator insight, June 24, 8:12 AM

In an increasingly global community this is critical. Collaboration across borders and in increasingly virtual work environments, a new playbook is in order.

Donna Karlin's curator insight, June 24, 8:19 AM

In an increasingly virtual work environment and global community this is critical

june holley's curator insight, July 19, 7:33 AM

Some really important material on connection between leadership and social technology...

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Network Leadership
Scoop.it!

Factors that support collective intelligence and wisdom

Factors that support collective intelligence and wisdom | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Via june holley
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from LeadershipABC
Scoop.it!

How Google Has Changed Management, 10 Years After its IPO

How Google Has Changed Management, 10 Years After its IPO | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Google went public 10 years ago today, and since then has dramatically changed the way the world accesses information. It has also helped shape the practice of management. Staying true to its roots as an engineering-centric company, Google has stood out both for its early skepticism of the value of managers as well as for its novel, often quantitative approaches to management decisions. Along the way it became famous for its reliance on exceedingly difficult interview questions — later abandoned — and its “20% time” policy — reportedly on its way out.

 

In honor of the company’s milestone, here’s a reading list of some of the best things Harvard Business Review has published on the company since its founding in 1998.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, August 21, 3:18 AM

Excellent overview of the best Harvard Business Review articles on Google.

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from LeadershipABC
Scoop.it!

Schumpeter: Decluttering the company

Schumpeter: Decluttering the company | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

PETER DRUCKER once observed that, “Much of what we call management consists of making it difficult for people to work.” Nine years after the management guru’s death, his remark is truer than ever: employees often have to negotiate a mass of clutter—from bulging inboxes to endless meetings and long lists of objectives to box-tick—before they can focus on their real work. For the past 50 years manufacturers have battled successfully to streamline their factory floors and make them “lean”.


Today, businesses of all types need to do the same in their offices.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
Tania Tytherleigh's curator insight, August 3, 6:57 AM

Organisations are filled with 'clutter'. From tiers of management, to increasingly complex corporate objectives, meetings and emails. Clutter takes a toll on morale and productivity. Organisations must set time aside to 'spring clean' the clutter - when will you do yours?

Michael Binzer's curator insight, August 4, 3:36 AM

So true. Too much cluttering - how can we remove it? Read XL R8 by John Kotter. One option?

Graeme Reid's curator insight, August 5, 1:57 AM

There is a lot of decluttering to do in most organisations.

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from LeadershipABC
Scoop.it!

Management’s Three Eras: A Brief History

Management’s Three Eras: A Brief History | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Today, we are in the midst of another fundamental rethinking of what organizations are and for what purpose they exist. If organizations existed in the execution era to create scale and in the expertise era to provide advanced services, today many are looking to organizations to create complete and meaningful experiences. I would argue that management has entered a new era of empathy.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, August 1, 7:09 AM

Important blog post by Rita Gunther McGrath on the changing nature of management. 

Alex Watson's curator insight, August 1, 3:07 PM

It's an interesting post on a popular topic. Has management entered a new era of empathy? I've had both good and bad managers. Of course that is a subjective view and my opinion and experience of good may not be that of another. One thing I will say...I have learned a lot from all of my managers good and bad. We often learn a lot through osmosis and observation. So even distasteful experiences leave much food for thought and progress. 

 

As for the future of management in organisations. Much management theory past and present is built on a set of historic assumptions. Many managers of yesterday, are not managers of today and so on.  There have always been managers with empathy, as well as those lacking. Who is the manager's manager? That usually says a lot. 

 

In terms of hierarchy. Some people have unwavering faith in hierarchy and would not know how to operate outside of  that context. I've always wondered how come in many organisations, some people put so much credence on what 'management' say? Often...its because of job security, and acceptance of a status quo. Regardless of the merits of management decision making. So...when any person, practice  or prevailing wind comes along to challenge this status quo...disruption whether subtle or overt is usually not far away.

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Everyday Leadership
Scoop.it!

The 5 Ways to Spot an Emotionally Intelligent Leader

The 5 Ways to Spot an Emotionally Intelligent Leader | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it
Research has shown us that more than 90 percent of top leadership performers have a high amount of emotional intelligence, or EI. The higher up the ladder that leaders are, the more people …

Via Joe Boutte
more...
Joe Boutte's curator insight, July 29, 6:04 AM

These are good ways to help to begin to be an emotionally intelligent leader. I like the fifth way:  "Able to check their ego and allow others to shine", but all five are good ways to improve everyday leadership.

 

Judy Knight's curator insight, August 1, 12:17 PM

add your insight...

Suvi Salo's curator insight, August 1, 12:39 PM
"Able to check their ego and allow others to shine"
Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Curation & The Future of Publishing
Scoop.it!

Blogging as a Content Curation Hub

Blogging as a Content Curation Hub | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

I want to take a look at curation through the lens of blogging. How can educators and students use their blogs to become their own information curators and content curators for others in their learning community.


Via Gust MEES, Guillaume Decugis
more...
Mónica Silakowicz's curator insight, June 24, 9:39 AM

Curar contenido es más que simplemente buscar y seleccionar información.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, July 26, 7:45 AM

Blogging as a Curation Platform

John Poole's curator insight, July 28, 6:03 AM

Founder of scoopIT

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

The Evolution Of The Employee

The Evolution Of The Employee | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

This concept and the visual was taken from my new book which came out today called, The Future of Work: Attract New Talent, Build Better Leaders, and Create a Competitive Organization.

 

One of the things I have been writing about and have tried to make clear over the past few months is that work as we know it is dead and that the only way forward is to challenge convention around how we work, how we lead, and how we build our companies. Employees which were once thought of expendable cogs are the most valuable asset that any organization has. However, the employee from a decade ago isn’t the same as the employee who we are starting to see today. To help show that I wanted to share an image from my upcoming book which depicts how employees are evolving. It’s an easy way to see the past vs the future.

 


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
more...
Tom Hood's curator insight, September 6, 8:27 AM

Nice graphic that captures the essence of how work and the employee is changing / needing to change. It is very close to an exercise we did with our team as we prepared for our move and our "workplace" consultants (Avance') had our entire team map how work was, how it is now, and where they see it going... Here are some of the key areas:

 

From individual work to group work

From hierarchy to flat structure

From Independent group to interdependent group

From internally focused to external (customer/member and brand)

From planned connections to spontaneous connections

From single work point to multiple workpoints

From structured to fluid

 

This also reinforces our approach to what we are calling the "shift change" and how the interplay of technology, workplace, leadership, learning, and culture are all in need of intentional thoughtful planning to get the most out of the new world we are facing...

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, September 18, 3:35 AM

Wow, like it...:-)))

Hélène Introvigne's curator insight, September 18, 2:39 PM

the future of work !

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Knowledge Management
Scoop.it!

The internal KM consultant, methods, analysis, case example

The internal KM consultant, methods, analysis, case example | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

The internal KM consultant Step 1: problem identification (a step series toward excellent knowledge capability)


Via John Hovell
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Knowledge Management
Scoop.it!

Rita McGrath, The End of Competitive Advantage

Rita McGrath, The End of Competitive Advantage | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Via John Hovell
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Knowledge Management
Scoop.it!

The Use of the Cynefin Model for Innovation

The Use of the Cynefin Model for Innovation | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Firstly a very brief explanation of the Cynefin Model and why I find it highly valuable for innovation. Innovation has many characteristics of a complex adaptive system as I have crudely attempted...


Via John Hovell
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Innovation & Creativity
Scoop.it!

The Use of the Cynefin Model for Innovation

The Use of the Cynefin Model for Innovation | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it
Firstly a very brief explanation of the Cynefin Model and why I find it highly valuable for innovation. Innovation has many characteristics of a complex adaptive system as I have crudely  attempted...

Via Anne Leong
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Knowledge Broker
Scoop.it!

The 5 Different Types Of Intuition And How To Hone Yours

The 5 Different Types Of Intuition And How To Hone Yours | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Most of us rely on snap-judgments to form our views on people or situations around us. How can we make sure they're the right calls?


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, August 22, 1:20 PM

There are five types of intuition (you can find your type, here):


Analysts spend a lot of time researching and data-gathering before making a decision about a situation, and aren’t satisfied until every potential scenario is explored and played out. A snap judgement is always a poor judgement, to an “analyst.”


Observers gather clues, mostly visually, about the people and scenarios around them. If she passes a coworker in the hallway that won’t return their smile, the “observer” takes this subtlety to heart.


Questioners are more direct about their judgement-making. If they need to find the perfect venue for their company happy hour, they don’t rely on online reviews or appearances, but ask around for the group’s top pick. “Questioners” make real-life, evidence-based decisions, but neglects to pick up on unspoken cues.


Empathizers are quick to let colleagues and clients vent out their problems, and go with them emotionally to the source of the problem. Unfortunately, too much empathy skews their judgment when it’s time to make an unbiased call.


Adapters are the all-star intuitors, the Zoltar fortune teller of the office. They give the best advice, and you know you can go to them when things get hairy. But where they excel in gut-feelings, they struggle to relate with others who seem to gravitate toward poor choices.


Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Network Leadership
Scoop.it!

The 5 Ways to Spot an Emotionally Intelligent Leader

The 5 Ways to Spot an Emotionally Intelligent Leader | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it
Research has shown us that more than 90 percent of top leadership performers have a high amount of emotional intelligence, or EI. The higher up the ladder that leaders are, the more people …

Via june holley
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Network Leadership
Scoop.it!

On Motivation

On Motivation | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it
Margaret Wheatley – Paradigm Shifter, Author and Co-Founder of the Berkana Institute
There is a misperception that people are motivated by competition. People are actually motivated by generosity and love.

Via june holley
more...
june holley's curator insight, August 22, 1:51 PM

Great stuff on new leadership.

Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 22, 6:38 PM

Walk out and Walk on is a great book. The last few years I taught I thought about that phrase a lot. We have to let go when we move on. It is hard and ongoing work.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from LeadershipABC
Scoop.it!

Management’s Three Eras: A Brief History

Management’s Three Eras: A Brief History | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Today, we are in the midst of another fundamental rethinking of what organizations are and for what purpose they exist. If organizations existed in the execution era to create scale and in the expertise era to provide advanced services, today many are looking to organizations to create complete and meaningful experiences. I would argue that management has entered a new era of empathy.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, August 1, 7:09 AM

Important blog post by Rita Gunther McGrath on the changing nature of management. 

Alex Watson's curator insight, August 1, 3:07 PM

It's an interesting post on a popular topic. Has management entered a new era of empathy? I've had both good and bad managers. Of course that is a subjective view and my opinion and experience of good may not be that of another. One thing I will say...I have learned a lot from all of my managers good and bad. We often learn a lot through osmosis and observation. So even distasteful experiences leave much food for thought and progress. 

 

As for the future of management in organisations. Much management theory past and present is built on a set of historic assumptions. Many managers of yesterday, are not managers of today and so on.  There have always been managers with empathy, as well as those lacking. Who is the manager's manager? That usually says a lot. 

 

In terms of hierarchy. Some people have unwavering faith in hierarchy and would not know how to operate outside of  that context. I've always wondered how come in many organisations, some people put so much credence on what 'management' say? Often...its because of job security, and acceptance of a status quo. Regardless of the merits of management decision making. So...when any person, practice  or prevailing wind comes along to challenge this status quo...disruption whether subtle or overt is usually not far away.

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from LeadershipABC
Scoop.it!

Management’s Three Eras: A Brief History

Management’s Three Eras: A Brief History | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it

Today, we are in the midst of another fundamental rethinking of what organizations are and for what purpose they exist. If organizations existed in the execution era to create scale and in the expertise era to provide advanced services, today many are looking to organizations to create complete and meaningful experiences. I would argue that management has entered a new era of empathy.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
more...
Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, August 1, 7:09 AM

Important blog post by Rita Gunther McGrath on the changing nature of management. 

Alex Watson's curator insight, August 1, 3:07 PM

It's an interesting post on a popular topic. Has management entered a new era of empathy? I've had both good and bad managers. Of course that is a subjective view and my opinion and experience of good may not be that of another. One thing I will say...I have learned a lot from all of my managers good and bad. We often learn a lot through osmosis and observation. So even distasteful experiences leave much food for thought and progress. 

 

As for the future of management in organisations. Much management theory past and present is built on a set of historic assumptions. Many managers of yesterday, are not managers of today and so on.  There have always been managers with empathy, as well as those lacking. Who is the manager's manager? That usually says a lot. 

 

In terms of hierarchy. Some people have unwavering faith in hierarchy and would not know how to operate outside of  that context. I've always wondered how come in many organisations, some people put so much credence on what 'management' say? Often...its because of job security, and acceptance of a status quo. Regardless of the merits of management decision making. So...when any person, practice  or prevailing wind comes along to challenge this status quo...disruption whether subtle or overt is usually not far away.

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Everyday Leadership
Scoop.it!

Agility Is The Key To Survival In Good Times And Bad

Agility Is The Key To Survival In Good Times And Bad | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it
Most small businesses are trying to forget the recent recession, and get back to “business as usual.” They don’t realize that business as usual is gone forever. With social media and smart phone conversations, real product information spreads at astounding speeds. Entrepreneurs that are not listening, not engaging, and not [...]

Via Joe Boutte
more...
Joe Boutte's curator insight, July 24, 1:31 PM

Martin Zwilling provides some great advice for everyday leadership with several suggestions for leader agility.  I particularly like the “big bang theory of change", where Mr. Zwilling states, "innovations only come through huge and expensive new projects, with big rollouts, is a thing of the past".   He is right when he says that "new innovations should be seen as experiments, which are inexpensive, measurable, quick to fail, and without retribution if they don’t work."  Leaders experiment everyday or they should!   Nice read.

Rescooped by Paul Hobcraft from Curation & The Future of Publishing
Scoop.it!

7 Tactics For Content Curation Success

7 Tactics For Content Curation Success | Building Innovation Capital | Scoop.it
Want to excel at content curation? Here are 7 tactics for content curation success to help you increase your curated information's effectiveness

Via Guillaume Decugis
more...
Guillaume Decugis's curator insight, May 19, 11:09 PM

I love seeing lists like this one by Heidi Cohen or this other one by Barry Feldman: it's a strong sign that content curation is being embraced by more and more people, including a lot of content professionals.


But as these lists tend to be overwhelming, it's also a very interesting reminder of the importance of tools to facilitate the content curation workflow. When Heidi recommends acting as a "trustworthy filter" for instance, this is easier said than done if you don't have a way to easily find relevant content in the first place.