Innovation and Medical Devices
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This Week in Biotech: A Double-Dose of Hot Potato - Motley Fool

This Week in Biotech: A Double-Dose of Hot Potato - Motley Fool | Innovation and Medical Devices | Scoop.it
This Week in Biotech: A Double-Dose of Hot Potato
Motley Fool
With the SPDR S&P Biotech Index up 52% over the trailing 12-month period, it's evident that investment dollars are willingly flowing into the biotech sector.
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'Open science' finds disruptive home in Academia.edu - San Francisco Business Times

'Open science' finds disruptive home in Academia.edu - San Francisco Business Times | Innovation and Medical Devices | Scoop.it
Academia.edu, an open-science publishing site, recently hit 10 million users.
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5 Startups Poised to Change MedTech Forever (MC10) | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers

5 Startups Poised to Change MedTech Forever (MC10) | MDDI Medical Device and Diagnostic Industry News Products and Suppliers | Innovation and Medical Devices | Scoop.it
      Technologies adapted from a different industry have the ability to stretch the capability of any given sector. And that seems to be the case with MC10.   The Cambridge, Massachusetts company makes flexible, stretchable electronics with the goal of transforming traditionally rigid devices into something easily wearable and in some case virtually invisible.
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How to make ceramics that bend without breaking: Self-deploying medical devices?

How to make ceramics that bend without breaking: Self-deploying medical devices? | Innovation and Medical Devices | Scoop.it
New materials could lead to actuators on a chip and self-deploying medical devices. Ceramics are not known for their flexibility: they tend to crack under stress.

 

The team has developed a way of making minuscule ceramic objects that are not only flexible, but also have a "memory" for shape: When bent and then heated, they return to their original shapes. The surprising discovery is reported this week in the journalScience, in a paper by MIT graduate student Alan Lai, professor Christopher Schuh, and two collaborators in Singapore.

 

Shape-memory materials, which can bend and then snap back to their original configurations in response to a temperature change, have been known since the 1950s, explains Schuh, the Danae and Vasilis Salapatas Professor of Metallurgy and head of MIT's Department of Materials Science and Engineering. "It's been known in metals, and some polymers," he says, "but not in ceramics."

 

In principle, the molecular structure of ceramics should make shape memory possible, he says -- but the materials' brittleness and propensity for cracking has been a hurdle. "The concept has been there, but it's never been realized," Schuh says. "That's why we were so excited."

 

The key to shape-memory ceramics, it turns out, was thinking small.

 

The team accomplished this in two key ways. First, they created tiny ceramic objects, invisible to the naked eye: "When you make things small, they are more resistant to cracking," Schuh says. Then, the researchers concentrated on making the individual crystal grains span the entire small-scale structure, removing the crystal-grain boundaries where cracks are most likely to occur.

Those tactics resulted in tiny samples of ceramic material -- samples with deformability equivalent to about 7 percent of their size. "Most things can only deform about 1 percent," Lai says, adding that normal ceramics can't even bend that much without cracking.

 

"Usually if you bend a ceramic by 1 percent, it will shatter," Schuh says. But these tiny filaments, with a diameter of just 1 micrometer -- one millionth of a meter -- can be bent by 7 to 8 percent repeatedly without any cracking, he says.

 

While a micrometer is pretty tiny by most standards, it's actually not so small in the world of nanotechnology. "It's large compared to a lot of what nanotech people work on," Lai says. As such, these materials could be important tools for those developing micro- and nanodevices, such as for biomedical applications. For example, shape-memory ceramics could be used as microactuators to trigger actions within such devices -- such as the release of drugs from tiny implants.

 


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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