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Highly trained, respected and free: why Finland's teachers are different

Highly trained, respected and free: why Finland's teachers are different | innovation in learning | Scoop.it
Welcome to a country where teaching is a highly prized profession. Finland’s teachers have kept the nation near the top of the influential Pisa performance rankings since they were first published in 2001, leading to an influx of educational tourists as other teachers have endeavoured to learn from the Finnish experience.

 

The high-level training is the basis for giving young teachers a great deal of autonomy to choose what methods they use in the classroom – in contrast to England, Krokfors says, where she feels teaching is “somewhere between administration and giving tests to students”. In Finland, teachers are largely free from external requirements such as inspection, standardised testing and government control; school inspections were scrapped in the 1990s.

 

“Teachers need to have this high-quality education so they really do know how to use the freedom they are given, and learn to solve problems in a research-based way,” Krokfors says. “The most important thing we teach them is to take pedagogical decisions and judgments for themselves.”

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Finland

 

 
Via Gust MEES
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Kati Pärkkä's curator insight, June 25, 1:39 AM

Teachers' basic training is very qualified. To make sure that the quality of teaching stays on high level we should invest on in-service training of all teachers. The world and society is developing faster and faster every day...

Iva Golec's curator insight, August 3, 9:43 AM
Welcome to a country where teaching is a highly prized profession. Finland’s teachers have kept the nation near the top of the influential Pisa performance rankings since they were first published in 2001, leading to an influx of educational tourists as other teachers have endeavoured to learn from the Finnish experience.

 

The high-level training is the basis for giving young teachers a great deal of autonomy to choose what methods they use in the classroom – in contrast to England, Krokfors says, where she feels teaching is “somewhere between administration and giving tests to students”. In Finland, teachers are largely free from external requirements such as inspection, standardised testing and government control; school inspections were scrapped in the 1990s.

 

“Teachers need to have this high-quality education so they really do know how to use the freedom they are given, and learn to solve problems in a research-based way,” Krokfors says. “The most important thing we teach them is to take pedagogical decisions and judgments for themselves.”

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Finland

 

Boutara Nour Eddine's curator insight, August 10, 12:55 PM
Welcome to a country where teaching is a highly prized profession. Finland’s teachers have kept the nation near the top of the influential Pisa performance rankings since they were first published in 2001, leading to an influx of educational tourists as other teachers have endeavoured to learn from the Finnish experience.

 

The high-level training is the basis for giving young teachers a great deal of autonomy to choose what methods they use in the classroom – in contrast to England, Krokfors says, where she feels teaching is “somewhere between administration and giving tests to students”. In Finland, teachers are largely free from external requirements such as inspection, standardised testing and government control; school inspections were scrapped in the 1990s.

 

“Teachers need to have this high-quality education so they really do know how to use the freedom they are given, and learn to solve problems in a research-based way,” Krokfors says. “The most important thing we teach them is to take pedagogical decisions and judgments for themselves.”

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Finland

 

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Want to Know the Secrets of Finnish Education?

Want to Know the Secrets of Finnish Education? | innovation in learning | Scoop.it
Clearly, there seems to be a disconnect between much of what’s written about Finnish education and reality. This is a curious matter. Yes, we all agree that Finnish education has been successful,...

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Linda Alexander's comment, August 24, 2013 10:57 AM
Thank you for the article, Susan and Juandoming. I altered the title before I shared it.
Patch Self-help's curator insight, August 24, 2013 7:09 PM

In Finland there is also a development in mental health practice known as Open Dialogue. Look it up. In Nottingham there is a group of people trying to bring Open Dialogue to the UK starting locally. What is it? It is a way of treating people in distress with real care and understanding rather than sedating them with drugs and labeling them Psychotic for life with on going prescriptions. The best way to avoid side affects. It is a real education so do look up more about this and look out for MHAW in Nottingham where you can find an event focuswd on Open Dialogue in the orange leaflet out soon in Libraries and GP surgeries.

 

Dafnord 's curator insight, August 28, 2013 3:31 PM

15-åriga finska elever har fått fortfarande bästa resultat i internationella PISA-studier. Därför talar man om den "mytiska finska undervisningen". Jag tror att bakom den där framgången är viljan att lära sig. De förflutna tider har inte varit lätta för Finland. Kampen mot fattigdom, kampen för nationell existens, kampen för ett eget språk. Är det möjligt att just den hårda kampen har påverkat finnarna så att uppskattningen av kultur, bildning och lärning har utvecklat särskilt kraftigt bland medborgare? Jag bara frågar.

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Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | EDUcation CHANGE | Teaching by Topic

Schools in Finland will no longer teach 'subjects' | EDUcation CHANGE | Teaching by Topic | innovation in learning | Scoop.it

For years, Finland has been the by-word for a successful education system, perched at the top of international league tables for literacy and numeracy.

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Pasi Silander, the city’s development manager, explained: “What we need now is a different kind of education to prepare people for working life.

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“Young people use quite advanced computers. In the past the banks had lots of  bank clerks totting up figures but now that has totally changed.

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“We therefore have to make the changes in education that are necessary for industry and modern society.”

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Subject-specific lessons – an hour of history in the morning, an hour of geography in the afternoon – are already being phased out for 16-year-olds in the city’s upper schools. They are being replaced by what the Finns call “phenomenon” teaching – or teaching by topic. For instance, a teenager studying a vocational course might take “cafeteria services” lessons, which would include elements of maths, languages (to help serve foreign customers), writing skills and communication skills.

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More academic pupils would be taught cross-subject topics such as the European Union - which would merge elements of economics, history (of the countries involved), languages and geography.

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jmoreillon's curator insight, March 27, 9:42 AM

This is what school librarians have been doing forever!

María Florencia Perrone's curator insight, April 8, 4:00 PM

The world around us is not labelled or divided in categories, then why is academic content? Can we not relate topics and elaborate meaning on the basis of relationships and intertwined data? 

Helen Teague's curator insight, April 13, 9:11 PM

I wonder if this would work in the U.S.? Also, in Finland, students do not take standardized tests until the end of high school (Zhao, 2012, p. 111), so thankfully, perhaps the drill and kill process is diminished.


*Zhao, Y. (2012). World Class Learners.