Uso inteligente de las herramientas TIC
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Uso inteligente de las herramientas TIC
Ciencia, tecnología, innovación y educación
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Las mejores herramientas educativas online del 2013.-

Las mejores herramientas educativas online del 2013.- | Uso inteligente de las herramientas TIC | Scoop.it

C4LPT (Centre for Learning & Performance Technologies) ha compartido una nueva edición de los resultados arrojados por su encuesta anual sobre las 100 mejores herramientas para el Aprendizaje.

Una lista que tiene en cuenta tanto aquellas herramientas que contribuyen al desarrollo y formación del docente como las que influyen directamente en la forma de impartir la enseñanza. Esta iniciativa liderada por Jane Hart puede ser una guía interesante a tener en cuenta para implementar nuevos recursos  y herramientas educativas. Dando un recorrido por los primeros puestos.


Via Mauricio M. Escudero, José Moraga Campos, Jairo Acosta Solano
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Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | Uso inteligente de las herramientas TIC | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"


 

 


Via Robin Good, João Greno Brogueira, Amanda McAndrew, THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*, Silvano Poblano Morales, Felix Val, Cristóbal Suárez
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Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?

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31 Surprising (& Controversial) Research Findings About How Students Learn

31 Surprising (& Controversial) Research Findings About How Students Learn | Uso inteligente de las herramientas TIC | Scoop.it

This post begins "Have you checked your assumptions about student learning at the door?" It then provides 31 research findings that may make you pause and reconsider some of your beliefs. 

* Are there any benefits to "playing scary and violent video games"?

* Can video games impact "disruptive behaviors and enhance positive development in ADHD children"?

* Is it best to teach very young children how to play with a toy or should we allow them to explore on their own?

An additional 28 findings) are provided in this post. 


Via Beth Dichter
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John McDermott Neill's curator insight, December 16, 2012 4:01 AM

Some interesting and surprising findings to make us think about our own preconceptions.

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17 Real-World Ways iPads Are Being Used In Schools - Edudemic

17 Real-World Ways iPads Are Being Used In Schools - Edudemic | Uso inteligente de las herramientas TIC | Scoop.it
We see iPads in education all over the place. So what are some actual ways iPads are being used in schools that you could learn from?

Via Beth Dichter
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Beth Dichter's curator insight, February 21, 2013 8:16 PM

Are you wondering how other school districts (and colleges) are using iPads? This post provides short descriptions as well as links to a wide variety of ways iPads are being used across the world.

Below are four areas found in this post:

* Putting students in charge of the learning process

* Helping students with disabilities

* Closing the digital achievement gap

* Re-imagining how newspapers are used in class

Each area discussed provides a link for additional information. If you are about to bring iPads into your school, or have a program up and running and are interested in learning what others are doing take the time to read this post.

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The Value of Mistakes: Should It Matter How Long A Student Takes To Learn?

The Value of Mistakes: Should It Matter How Long A Student Takes To Learn? | Uso inteligente de las herramientas TIC | Scoop.it

Are mistakes a part of the learning process? If they are, what does this say about our current education system? This post explores these ideas, asking the following questions and following each with a number of responses that explores each question in greater detail. The first section has two questions:

* Why are mistakes important to achieve engagement and learning?

* Why do we avoid mistakes in our current model?

The second section, Turning Mistakes into Learning Opportunities asks one question:

* How can we use learning errors to our advantage?

At the beginning of this post the author speaks of James Joyce, and also does so at the end where she states (referring to Joyce) "a true genius sees all learning as an opportunity to improve and discover. Errors are taken at will. In making mistakes, we can reach new heights and find our true genius." Will schools move in this direction?


Via Beth Dichter
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