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Small Living Spaces Pack in a Lot of Benefits

Small Living Spaces Pack in a Lot of Benefits | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Is a big house really a step up? Small living spaces offer many personal, financial, and environmental benefits - no shipping container required!

Via Flora Moon
Suzette Jackson's insight:

While thesis an American based info graphic it is still highly relevant for Australia as we see the area required per person jump Australia!

The size of your home needs to relate to the size of the occupants/family and allow for zoning / flexibility and onsite generation of resources.

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Rescooped by Suzette Jackson from Urban ecology
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6,000 lbs of food on 1/10th acre - Urban Farm - Urban Homestead - Growing Your Own Food

Over 6,000 pounds of food per year, on 1/10 acre located just 15 minutes from downtown Los Angeles. The Dervaes family grows over 400 species of plants, 4,30...

Via Daniel Moura
Suzette Jackson's insight:

the urban homestead, see how this family grows more than enough food to live off and produce for restaurants

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Daniel Moura's curator insight, February 20, 2013 2:44 AM

"Path to Freedom" homestead: living urban doesn't mean living unnaturaly. A great example of urban farm and how you can reduce your ecological footprint

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America's "greenest street" provides a blueprint for sustainable urban development

America's "greenest street" provides a blueprint for sustainable urban development | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

A streetscape that includes natural landscaping, bicycle lanes, wind powered lighting, storm water diversion for irrigation, drought-resistant native plants and innovative “smog-eating” concrete has earned Cermak road in Chicago the title of “greenest Street in America” according to the Chicago Department of Transport (CDOT).

 

Opened in October 2012, the first phase two mile stretch is part of the Blue Island/Cermak Sustainable Streetscape project which was introduced in 2009 with the aim of reducing overall energy usage by 42 percent.


Via Lauren Moss, Daniel Moura
Suzette Jackson's insight:

how does your street rate? compare it to the 'greenest street in America?

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Mercor's curator insight, February 4, 2013 3:42 AM

Scooped by Lauren Moss

Rescooped by Suzette Jackson from Sustainable Futures
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Small Living Spaces Pack in a Lot of Benefits

Small Living Spaces Pack in a Lot of Benefits | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Is a big house really a step up? Small living spaces offer many personal, financial, and environmental benefits - no shipping container required!

Via Flora Moon
Suzette Jackson's insight:

While thesis an American based info graphic it is still highly relevant for Australia as we see the area required per person jump Australia!

The size of your home needs to relate to the size of the occupants/family and allow for zoning / flexibility and onsite generation of resources.

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Rescooped by Suzette Jackson from Mapping the food system
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Grow your own - The Australia Institute

Grow your own - The Australia Institute | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

Australia’s high rate of urbanisation means that most people experience a significant disconnect between their food production and consumption. Over several decades, suburban gardens have ceased to be major sites of food production and Australians reportedly have a declining understanding and appreciation of how their food is grown. Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the quality, provenance, freshness and price of food, driving a companion interest in Australians growing their own food at home or in community gardens.

 

This paper examines who is currently growing their own food, the motivations and barriers in relation to home and community gardening and the potential for home grown food to deliver benefits such as health and social inclusion improvements and to protect food security. The research is based on a literature review, a survey of 1,390 households across Australia and interviews with experts and community gardeners.


Via Good Food Projects
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Rescooped by Suzette Jackson from green streets
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How we will live: More green, more urban, more efficient

How we will live: More green, more urban, more efficient | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
The neighborhoods of 2039 will feel more like cityscapes with environmentally friendly, energy efficient amenities and people living closer to their jobs.

How we live is indicative of who we are, and both are changing. As city planners look to the next quarter century, they must factor in three profound shifts in modern society: information technology, mobility and climate.

As with everything else, technology is changing not just how we live and work, but the cities where we live and work. That technology has already affected social change, making younger generations more mobile and urban. Technology has also offered new solutions to some of the biggest challenges for 21st century urban planners—climate change and how we make our neighborhoods as green as possible.

 

More at the link...


Via Lauren Moss
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Catherine Devin's curator insight, April 7, 6:00 AM

Il y a besoin de réfléchir à comment  intégrer les projets de durabilité en milieu urbain et les projets technologiques. On présente souvent ces derniers comme la solution aux questions posées par les premiers; c'est vrai, comme l'indiquent des observateurs du Green IT mais seulement si elles sont aussi élaborées avec une démarche RSE Au final, la technologie serait plutôt une  des composantes de nos vies futures apportant son lot de solutions et de questions... à nous de pousser à ses côtés aussi d'autres solutions  : nouvelles attitudes, nouveaux usages pour une ville durable... mais aussi désirable et humaine ?

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Community Architect: Strategic Mapping for Suburban Open Space

Community Architect: Strategic Mapping for Suburban Open Space | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

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Bhopkins's curator insight, April 29, 10:22 PM

Proud to share this terrific blog post from our board president, Klaus Philipsen!

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Urban farms won't feed us, but they just might teach us

Urban farms won't feed us, but they just might teach us | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

It's clear that the craze for the urban farm is no answer to feeding our teeming cities. Its value lies instead in how it can change us.

 

If we want to scale up regional food systems, it seems like it would be a great idea to grow a significant amount of our calories right in our cities. It’s a beautiful concept, reuniting humans and nature to solve many of the problems brought about by our urbanization. But talking to urban farmers and reading the recent research turned a cold hose (of reclaimed rooftop drain water) on my enthusiasm.

There’s a backlash underway against the general exuberance over urban farming, and, surprisingly, it’s coming from urban farmers. It’s a measured, cautious backlash — less pendulum swing than correction...

 


Via Lauren Moss
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Urban Farming is not the only solution towards feeding the growing population in cities but it certainly contributes to greater food resilience, habitat and biodiversity in cities. It makes a valuable contribution to local economy and food access which is part of a much bigger picture.

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Russell Roberts's curator insight, May 1, 9:08 PM

Thanks to reporter Wes Thomas for this article on the pros and cons of "urban farming."  With food costs rising and supply timetables in flux, many city dwellers are considering some form of food self-sufficiency.  This article tempers some of that early enthusiasm with a needed dose of reality...farming, urban, or not is hard work.  Nonetheless, food and water are becoming the next resource battleground.  Both of these survival elements are being strained by a growing world population.  If these trends continue, Hawaii may not be able to afford the importation of food and fuel.  We may have to "go it alone" in the future.  One thing is for certain, food prices will continue to rise in a world of diminishing resources.  A very sobering article.  In short, there are too many mouths to feed with a slowly declining ability to feed them.  Aloha, Russ.

Judit Urquijo's curator insight, May 13, 1:08 AM

Nueva vuelta de tuerca a un tema relacionado con los techos verdes, asunto que traté recientemente en esta curación de contenidos. 

 

En su artículo, Nathanael Johnson alude a los beneficios que pueden suponer estas granjas o huertos urbanos sobre los ciudadanos, tanto desde el punto de vista de acceso a unos productos de calidad como en relación con el beneficio económico que puede generar en los productores. En relación con esta fuente de ingresos, el autor pone como ejemplo la empresa Lula Farms, proyecto que se inicio en una azotea de Montreal y que actualmente proporciona beneficios estables (http://bit.ly/1qymQyo).

 

Obviamente, son necesarias unas estructuras mínimas tales como una superficie lo suficientemente amplia y plana para que la inversión merezca la pena, siendo igualmente necesaria una estructura sólida que pueda soportar el peso sin problemas. No obstante, también pueden ser viables las conocidas como granjas verticales. 

 

En este vídeo podéis ver la granja de Montreal citada anteriormente (http://bit.ly/1l7qrfP).

Rescooped by Suzette Jackson from Adaptive Cities
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Creativity is the medicine to move from ideas to action

Creativity is the medicine to move from ideas to action | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Today in cities around the world people are mobilizing ideas to foster change. From the “indignados” in Madrid, to the Occupy Wall Street movement in New York to the massive mobilizations in the Av...

Via Manu Fernandez
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The Secret to Making Sustainable Cities - Jan Gehl and His 5 Birds

The Secret to Making Sustainable Cities - Jan Gehl and His 5 Birds | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Jan Gehl explores the concept of creating sustainable cities for people and within this article we share his 5 principles.

Via Manu Fernandez
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Bentejui Hernández Acosta's curator insight, December 29, 2013 2:58 AM

"We must take into account the environmental, cultural, political, and social characteristics of each place to understand the problems; the differences between them are crucial to generate better cities for people."

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Adapt Reuse Reclaim: 10 Landscape Design Projects That Turned Damaged, Neglected Places into Healthy, Beautiful Environments

Adapt Reuse Reclaim: 10 Landscape Design Projects That Turned Damaged, Neglected Places into Healthy, Beautiful Environments | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Landscape architects frequently work to transform areas that contain industrial and toxic waste, infrastructure no longer in use, or land affected by war, nat…

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Question to... Richard Register | Ecocity

Question to... Richard Register | Ecocity | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Richard Register talking about his hopes for EcoCity 2013, that aligns with much of our professions thinking globally... 

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Black to the Land « Interaction Institute for Social Change Blog

Black to the Land « Interaction Institute for Social Change Blog | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

Beginning in the early 1970s, an Alabama horticulturist and Tuskegee University professor named Booker T. Whatley started promoting direct marketing as a tool for small farmers. This took the form of what he called “clientele membership clubs,” as well as pick-your-own farms. Whatley traveled widely, giving as many as 50 seminars a year, and produced a small-farms newsletter with 20,000-some subscribers.


Via Flora Moon
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Direct marketing by famers is beginning to happen more in our region however supporting this may ensure farmers can stay on the land and their farms become more economically viable..

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The Visual Signature of Your City

The Visual Signature of Your City | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Social-media platforms like FourSquare and Twitter have been a boon for sociologists and geographers who now have entirely new ways of tracking how we move through cities, where we go, who we are, and even what we think of the world around us. There is one set of social-media platforms, however, that has been tougher to crack for useful data than others: photo-sharing sites. Their metadata can illustrate where people take photos, and how active they are. But on the whole, how do you aggregate useful data about entire cities and the differences between them from the content of millions of photos on a site like Instagram? Researchers have been working on this for the past year, and they've just posted some of the initial results from their Phototrails project here.The project is less an exploration of a specific research question, and more a first foray into what we might learn by treating user-generated photography as another source of Big Data.
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Rescooped by Suzette Jackson from Urban ecology
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How to 'Rightsize' a Street

How to 'Rightsize' a Street | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

The concept of a "road diet” has become increasingly popular, though the phrase fails to capture the wide variety of ways in which streets planned and paved decades ago often awkwardly fit the needs of changing communities today.

 

In many cases, redesigning city streetscapes is not just (or not at all) about eliminating roadway. It may be about adding parking (to benefit new businesses), or building a new median (for pedestrians who were never present before), or simply painting new markings on the pavement (SCHOOL X-ING).

 

According to the Project for Public Spaces, we might do better to think of the task as “rightsizing” streets instead of starving them. This week, the nonprofit planning and design organization published a series of case studies from across the country illustrating exactly what this could look like in a variety of settings. The above image pair, from the collection, shows before-and-after scenes of Prospect Park West in Brooklyn. Starting in the summer of 2010, the New York City Department of Transportation began retrofitting the street to accommodate cyclists and pedestrians crossing into Prospect Park. The whole project wasn’t simply a matter of pruning traffic lanes, but of adding yield signs, new traffic signal timing, bike lanes and pedestrian islands.


Via Lauren Moss, Daniel Moura
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Has your city 'rightsized' your streets? Slowing traffic and creating more engaging neighbourhoods

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American Grove's comment, January 28, 2013 5:56 AM
Too often space for trees (6 feet minimum) are left off the plan in a road diet.
American Grove's curator insight, January 28, 2013 5:59 AM

Munciple Arborist Beware!  Too often sufficient space for trees are being left out of the plans in road diets.  The problem is competing space for paths, bikeways, parking squeeze out an 8ft planting strip to a 4 ft planting strip or less.  4 Strip planting strips is not enough soil for shade trees. Bulb outs into parking and root bridging are innovative ways to work with the lack of space but requires an arborist to help plan. 

Rescooped by Suzette Jackson from green streets
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3 Clever Ideas To Re-Use San Francisco's Aging Infrastructure

3 Clever Ideas To Re-Use San Francisco's Aging Infrastructure | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

Called SF RE:MADE, San Francisco-based IwamotoScott Architecture propose up-cycling Candlestick Park and two other out-of-use waterfront landmarks, the Hunters Point Crane and the Islais Creek Silos, providing alternative uses for aging 20th-century structures whose original purposes have become outdated.


Via Lauren Moss
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Regenerative design requires a certain boldness by government, the courage to acknowledge when infrastructure is outdated and the future is on a different path. Kudo to SF RE:MADE

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Rescooped by Suzette Jackson from Adaptive Cities
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TNOC Encore: Vacant Land in Cities Could Provide Important Social and Ecological Benefits | The Nature of Cities

TNOC Encore: Vacant Land in Cities Could Provide Important Social and Ecological Benefits | The Nature of Cities | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

Via Manu Fernandez
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Identifying vacant land for ecological and food production purposes can assist with urban climate extremes and food security!

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David Week's curator insight, August 5, 5:12 AM

Important that some urban niches be devoted to our natural friends.

Rescooped by Suzette Jackson from green streets
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Los Angeles on cusp of becoming 'major' walkable city, study says

Los Angeles on cusp of becoming 'major' walkable city, study says | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Despite its long love affair with the car, Los Angeles is on the cusp of becoming a “major” walkable urban area. And doing so could do wonders for its real estate market, at least in spots.

 

That’s the gist of a new report released Tuesday by SmartGrowth America and George Washington University, which measured the number of walkable urban neighborhoods in 30 big metro areas and looked at the potential to develop more...


Via Lauren Moss
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Rescooped by Suzette Jackson from green streets
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Has the time come for floating cities?

Has the time come for floating cities? | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Could our cities be seaworthy – or are remarkable new proposals for floating urban communities merely utopian sci-fi?

 

A floating village at London's Royal Docks has the official nod, and Rotterdam has a Rijnhaven waterfront development experiment well under way. Eventually, whole neighbourhoods of water-threatened land could be given over to the seas. After decades of speculation and small-scale applications, the floating solution is finally enjoying political momentum – and serious investment...


Via Lauren Moss
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Norm Miller's curator insight, April 15, 10:23 AM

One way to deal with rising seas. :-)

 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 19, 12:08 AM

Planning for when sea levels rise … 

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Anatomy of a Smart City

Anatomy of a Smart City | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

The 19th century was a century of empires, 20th century was a century of nation states and the 21st century will be a century of cities...

 

This outstanding infographic (courtesy of postscapes.com) begins with some information about our current state of urbanization.

 

Did you know that 1.3 million people are moving to cities each week?! It then explains the need for smart cities and delves into what is required to establish these intelligent connected environments, how the smart city may take various forms in the developing worlds and what specific technologies are necessary to achieve such grand goals in practice.


Via Lauren Moss
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Christian Allié's comment, August 8, 2013 3:20 AM
"« Le 21ème siècle sera spirituel ou ne sera pas »
"The 21st century will be spiritual or will not"
http://lespoir.jimdo.com/2012/08/31/le-21%C3%A8me-si%C3%A8cle-sera-spirituel-ou-ne-sera-pas/
About cities too........may be !
Margarida Sá Costa's curator insight, August 8, 2013 8:27 AM

cities of the future....future new human political organizations?

Grd Lyon-millenaire3's comment, August 19, 2013 3:06 AM
It supposes an organization at the world level but which and with whom? Doubtless adds us in a transitional period. The best is yet to come.
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Tactical Economy? | Wise Economy

Tactical Economy? | Wise Economy | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Really loving tactical urbanism as a way to get stuff done MT @dellarucker: Tactical #econdev http://t.co/E4v0flqZOr #econdev #IEDC

Via Manu Fernandez
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Rescooped by Suzette Jackson from Renew Cities: Environmental Sustainability
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Renew Cities: Planning for Sustainability: A New Year's Resolution

Renew Cities: Planning for Sustainability: A New Year's Resolution | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

As the world exceeds 7 million inhabitants, global warming nears its tipping point and a majority of the earth’s citizens live in urban areas, visionary and action-oriented planning matters more than ever.


Via Renew Cities
Suzette Jackson's insight:

What changes can we bring in 2014; renewing our cities! what will you do for your city?

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Renew Cities's curator insight, January 1, 7:03 PM

On New Year's day, here's a little ditty I wrote in support of honest, sustainable planning.

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5 Talks on Public Spaces | Future Cities

5 Talks on Public Spaces | Future Cities | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
I wrote last month about speeches by Jan Gehl, Tina Saaby, and Anna Minton at the Royal Institute of British Architects annual research symposium. Now you can watch the full videos of those and other talks.

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Urban Interventions: A Tactical Urbanism Introduction.

Urban Interventions: A Tactical Urbanism Introduction. | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Join us to find how inexpensive, short-term urban interventions can create long-term societal change. Bottom up and top down.

Via Manu Fernandez
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Another introduction into tactical urbanism, ground up change to our urban spaces to encourage greater community interaction and direction from 'us', the community.

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The Tour de Work: fun video on bike commuting in Australia | Kaid Benfield's Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC

The Tour de Work: fun video on bike commuting in Australia | Kaid Benfield's Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
  As I write, Chris Froome, Alberto Contador, the immensely appealing Nairo Quintana and the indefatigable Richie Porte are mere days away from completing the 100th edition of the Tour de France.  It's a sports event like no other, three...
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Here is Adelaide doing great things with bikes, and I am hearing about from the USA... 

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Tactical urbanism: Citizen-inspired change

Tactical urbanism: Citizen-inspired change | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Some exciting things have been happening in Hamilton lately.
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Geelong Better Block was a community activation held in Geelong this June and a great example of how Tactical Urbanism works. 

This article further descibes tactical urbanism hapening overseas.

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