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Black to the Land « Interaction Institute for Social Change Blog

Black to the Land « Interaction Institute for Social Change Blog | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

Beginning in the early 1970s, an Alabama horticulturist and Tuskegee University professor named Booker T. Whatley started promoting direct marketing as a tool for small farmers. This took the form of what he called “clientele membership clubs,” as well as pick-your-own farms. Whatley traveled widely, giving as many as 50 seminars a year, and produced a small-farms newsletter with 20,000-some subscribers.


Via Flora Moon
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Direct marketing by famers is beginning to happen more in our region however supporting this may ensure farmers can stay on the land and their farms become more economically viable..

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The Big Disconnect - Infographic

The Big Disconnect - Infographic | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

Via Mário Carmo
Suzette Jackson's insight:

"Humans are disappearing from the outdoors at a rate that would make them top any conservationists list of endangered species"

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Rescooped by Suzette Jackson from green streets
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7 Rules for Designing Safer Cities

7 Rules for Designing Safer Cities | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
As a part of its EMBARQ Sustainable Urban Mobility initiative, the WRI Ross Center for Sustainable Cities has created a global reference guide called Cities Safer by Design “to help cities save lives from traffic fatalities through improved street design and smart urban development."

Via Lauren Moss
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Infographic: The Cost Of Living Around The World

Infographic: The Cost Of Living Around The World | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

Using data collected from Numbeo—the “world’s largest database of user contributed data about cities and countries worldwide”—web resource Movehub has created an infographic that points out the cost of living in different countries around the world. 

According to Movehub, the Consumer Price Index (CPI) was used to determine the living costs in the countries, which takes into account the prices for groceries, transportation, restaurants and utilities. 

Switzerland, Norway, Venezuela and Iceland have been identified as countries with the highest living cost, while India, Nepal, Pakistan and Tunisia have the lowest cost of living. 


Via Lauren Moss
Suzette Jackson's insight:

wondering where your money goes?  the cost of living around the world!

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The Cost of Sprawl: A Visual Comparison

The Cost of Sprawl: A Visual Comparison | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

The cost of sprawl is 2.5 times more expensive than the compact city.

Sidewalks, water and wastewater pipes, schools and libraries, police and fire protection, and of course, roads. And whether the costs are paid by the homeowner, the local government, or businesses, the lower density in the suburbs leads to higher costs to operate, maintain and replace all these services...


Via Lauren Moss
Suzette Jackson's insight:

The cost of sprawl is 2.5 times more expensive than the compact city.

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Cluster Eco-Habitat's curator insight, March 10, 2015 3:33 AM

L'étalement urbain, une de nos spécialités en Poitou-Charentes a un surcoût concernant les services et bien sûr environnemental.

Bonne illustration de cela

Bella The Non-Vampire's curator insight, March 10, 2015 10:12 AM

     Sprawl is the spread of development over the landscape. For suburban areas it's going to be more expensive than urban areas. Sprawl in suburban areas would overall take more time in making it more as an urban area. Making urban areas more industrial is going to be a lot easier especially since the area has already been industrialized. 

I.C.

Eben Lenderking's curator insight, March 11, 2015 8:22 AM

Pile 'em high

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Food Stamps Are Worth Double at These Michigan Farmers Markets—Helping Families and Local Businesses

Food Stamps Are Worth Double at These Michigan Farmers Markets—Helping Families and Local Businesses | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
A program that helps low-income families and local farmers.
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Seeding Spaces: Urban Agriculture Report

Seeding Spaces is an urban agriculture report that reveals the potential for urban agriculture, and the challenges urban farmers face in bringing food to the table in our community. Landscape architects and urban designers seek to transform urban spaces into regenerative, restorative, and productive landscape to create more healthy, livable cities.


Via Mário Carmo
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Mário Carmo's curator insight, March 8, 2015 7:18 PM

Seeding Spaces is an urban agriculture report that reveals the potential for urban agriculture, and the challenges urban farmers face in bringing food to the table in our community.

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Urban Treehouse Uses 150 Trees To Protect Residents From Noise And Pollution

Urban Treehouse Uses 150 Trees To Protect Residents From Noise And Pollution | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Luciano Pia, an architect in Italy, has a beautiful vision for how people and nature can live together even in a thoroughly urban landscape. 25 Verde, an apartment complex he designed in Turin, Italy, is a woven 5-story mix of lush trees and steel girders that let urban residents feel like they live in a giant urban tree-house.

Via Mário Carmo
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Mário Carmo's curator insight, March 15, 2015 12:51 PM

The organic and asymmetric shape of its terraces allow potted trees to “sprout” out from the building at random intervals. The ponds in the courtyard provide residents with a refreshing place to relax in the summer, and the 150 deciduous trees, which lose their trees in the winter, allow light to filter in to the building during the darker months. 

V Lynn Hammett's curator insight, March 15, 2015 1:57 PM

Now if we would only plant food bearing plants and trees in public spaces, we would really be getting somewhere.

Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, May 25, 2015 12:41 PM

This article discusses how nature can be incorporated into urban housing. It's common when living in the city to be bombarded with smog, noise, and the gross city smell. But Italian architect, Luciano Pia, managed to incorporate nature in a housing building in Turin, Italy. Pia's design utilizes 150 trees and more of nature's accessories to allow residents the feeling of living in a tree house. This design mutes noise pollution, and gives the residents clean air to breathe. Pia also incorporated ponds in the building to add serenity. 

This article links to Unit Seven, Cities & Urban Land Use, because it discusses how an architect solved a problem lots of urban residents face, pollution. More and more urban areas are going green, and this just shows one example of how someone incorporated nature into urban space to encourage healthy urban living. 

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The Petite Ceinture: the battle over Paris's abandoned railway

The Petite Ceinture: the battle over Paris's abandoned railway | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
A unique 19-mile belt of neglected green space in the very centre of the French capital is sparking debate among environmentalists and entrepreneur around the future direction of development in the city

Via Manu Fernandez
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Amazing and diverse communities have accessed this disused railway line over time not to mention the ecological corridor for other inhabitants that has been created by its disuse.

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How to 'Rightsize' a Street

How to 'Rightsize' a Street | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

The concept of a "road diet” has become increasingly popular, though the phrase fails to capture the wide variety of ways in which streets planned and paved decades ago often awkwardly fit the needs of changing communities today.

 

In many cases, redesigning city streetscapes is not just (or not at all) about eliminating roadway. It may be about adding parking (to benefit new businesses), or building a new median (for pedestrians who were never present before), or simply painting new markings on the pavement (SCHOOL X-ING).

 

According to the Project for Public Spaces, we might do better to think of the task as “rightsizing” streets instead of starving them. This week, the nonprofit planning and design organization published a series of case studies from across the country illustrating exactly what this could look like in a variety of settings. The above image pair, from the collection, shows before-and-after scenes of Prospect Park West in Brooklyn. Starting in the summer of 2010, the New York City Department of Transportation began retrofitting the street to accommodate cyclists and pedestrians crossing into Prospect Park. The whole project wasn’t simply a matter of pruning traffic lanes, but of adding yield signs, new traffic signal timing, bike lanes and pedestrian islands.


Via Lauren Moss, Daniel Moura
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Has your city 'rightsized' your streets? Slowing traffic and creating more engaging neighbourhoods

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American Grove's comment, January 28, 2013 8:56 AM
Too often space for trees (6 feet minimum) are left off the plan in a road diet.
American Grove's curator insight, January 28, 2013 8:59 AM

Munciple Arborist Beware!  Too often sufficient space for trees are being left out of the plans in road diets.  The problem is competing space for paths, bikeways, parking squeeze out an 8ft planting strip to a 4 ft planting strip or less.  4 Strip planting strips is not enough soil for shade trees. Bulb outs into parking and root bridging are innovative ways to work with the lack of space but requires an arborist to help plan. 

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3 Clever Ideas To Re-Use San Francisco's Aging Infrastructure

3 Clever Ideas To Re-Use San Francisco's Aging Infrastructure | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

Called SF RE:MADE, San Francisco-based IwamotoScott Architecture propose up-cycling Candlestick Park and two other out-of-use waterfront landmarks, the Hunters Point Crane and the Islais Creek Silos, providing alternative uses for aging 20th-century structures whose original purposes have become outdated.


Via Lauren Moss
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Regenerative design requires a certain boldness by government, the courage to acknowledge when infrastructure is outdated and the future is on a different path. Kudo to SF RE:MADE

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TNOC Encore: Vacant Land in Cities Could Provide Important Social and Ecological Benefits | The Nature of Cities

TNOC Encore: Vacant Land in Cities Could Provide Important Social and Ecological Benefits | The Nature of Cities | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

Via Manu Fernandez
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Identifying vacant land for ecological and food production purposes can assist with urban climate extremes and food security!

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David Week's curator insight, August 5, 2014 8:12 AM

Important that some urban niches be devoted to our natural friends.

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Los Angeles on cusp of becoming 'major' walkable city, study says

Los Angeles on cusp of becoming 'major' walkable city, study says | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Despite its long love affair with the car, Los Angeles is on the cusp of becoming a “major” walkable urban area. And doing so could do wonders for its real estate market, at least in spots.

 

That’s the gist of a new report released Tuesday by SmartGrowth America and George Washington University, which measured the number of walkable urban neighborhoods in 30 big metro areas and looked at the potential to develop more...


Via Lauren Moss
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Has the time come for floating cities?

Has the time come for floating cities? | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Could our cities be seaworthy – or are remarkable new proposals for floating urban communities merely utopian sci-fi?

 

A floating village at London's Royal Docks has the official nod, and Rotterdam has a Rijnhaven waterfront development experiment well under way. Eventually, whole neighbourhoods of water-threatened land could be given over to the seas. After decades of speculation and small-scale applications, the floating solution is finally enjoying political momentum – and serious investment...


Via Lauren Moss
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Norm Miller's curator insight, April 15, 2014 1:23 PM

One way to deal with rising seas. :-)

 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, April 19, 2014 3:08 AM

Planning for when sea levels rise … 

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Cleaning Up Urban Waterways With Manmade Islands

Cleaning Up Urban Waterways With Manmade Islands | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

About 10 miles west of central London, Hanwell is one of the towns that sits along the River Brent, a tributary of the Thames. As is true with many urban rivers, the Brent is bordered by concrete walls as it flows through towns and has been heavily polluted by industrial effluent and sewage.

 

Recently, a local environmental nonprofit called the Canal and River Trust wanted to restore the natural riverbank, but was thwarted from taking out the concrete retaining walls because of concerns over flooding. But the group found a clever alternative—a system of floating wetlands that would bring back the natural edge.


Via Mário Carmo
Suzette Jackson's insight:

#urbansolutions with #ecoislands cleaning up urban waterways.

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Juan Antonio Castán's curator insight, October 14, 2015 11:19 AM

Cleaning Up Urban Waterways With Manmade Islands  [Limpiar canales urbanos con islas artificiales]

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The 2014 GOOD City Index

The 2014 GOOD City Index | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
GOOD's annual breakdown of the most inspiring cities in the world.

'The heartbeat of a city is a difficult thing to measure. Some, like physicists Geoffrey West and Luis Bettencourt, say you can measure a city by the precise pace at which its citizens walk. Others think a city’s true worth lies in the cost of its housing, or the growth of its population, or the fiscal outlook of its property developers. At GOOD, we believe that a city’s heartbeat is best measured in “possibility”—the pervading sense that though a place may be far from perfect, its citizens are taking a bold stake in its future through a mixture of creativity, hustle, and civic engagement.'


Via Lauren Moss
Suzette Jackson's insight:

How do you measure a #good #city?

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Eight million tons: Researchers calculate the magnitude of plastic waste going into the ocean

Eight million tons: Researchers calculate the magnitude of plastic waste going into the ocean | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
A plastic grocery bag cartwheels down the beach until a gust of wind spins it into the ocean.

Via SustainOurEarth, massimo facchinetti, Lauren Moss
Suzette Jackson's insight:

So much plastic, it's mind boggling and it's in almost everything that is marketed. Do you struggle to buy your product or food without packaging? Nude products are what we need...

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Gordon McGlone's curator insight, February 18, 2015 12:59 AM

The Anthropocene comes plastic wrapped.

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INFOGRAPHIC: How food waste has become a huge global problem

INFOGRAPHIC: How food waste has become a huge global problem | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

Every year, an estimated 1.2 to 2 billion tons of food is wasted—a massive amount of food that, if saved, would be more enough to feed the world’s hungry. Food waste isn’t just a humanitarian issue however; the problem is also a waste of land, water, energy and money. To put food wastage in perspective, Arbtech created an infographic that points out some of the world’s worst offenders and explains how food loss occurs throughout the supply chain. Click through to learn more about food waste and, most importantly, what you can do to help.

 


Via Lauren Moss
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Food waste isn’t just a humanitarian issue however; the problem is also a waste of land, water, energy and money.

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Economic Impact of Metro Parks Tacoma Ecosystem Services

This report identifies 23 ecosystem services provided by the natural capital present in Metro Parks Tacoma (MPT) parks. Of these, 10 ecosystem services have been assigned value using eight valuation techniques including market value and cost avoidance. The results are compelling: By assigning value to ecosystem services like reducing the frequency and severity of urban floods, supporting fisheries and food production, maintaining critical habitat, enhancing recreation and providing waste treatme

Via Mário Carmo
Suzette Jackson's insight:

Assigning value to ecosystem services is incredibly important in valuing our regional ecologies and the climate benefits for urban areas: like reducing the frequency and severity of urban floods, supporting fisheries and food production, maintaining critical habitat, enhancing recreation and providing waste treatment.

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Mário Carmo's curator insight, March 14, 2015 3:16 PM

This report identifies 23 ecosystem services provided by the natural capital present in Metro Parks Tacoma (MPT) parks.

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Cities Alive - Rethinking Green Infrastructure

Cities Alive - Rethinking Green Infrastructure | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Cities Alive addresses global issues such as climate change, urban population growth, resource scarcity and risk of urban flooding.

Via Mário Carmo
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Mário Carmo's curator insight, March 15, 2015 8:56 AM

Cities Alive looks at how we can build nature into our urban systems at all scales through high quality landscape design, via new development or retrofitting through a green infrastructure design approach.

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Four types of placemaking

Four types of placemaking | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Placemaking is the process of creating quality places that people want to live, work, play, and learn in.

Via Manu Fernandez
Suzette Jackson's insight:

So what is Tactical Urbanism? It is the short term, often one day testing of urban solutions through activation! GeelongBetterBlock is a great example of this, inspired by urban activations in the USA by Jason Roberts andAndrew Howard.

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David Week's curator insight, October 12, 2014 5:10 AM

Nice typology of urban placemaking. And a nice definition of placemaking.

Christophe CESETTI's curator insight, December 27, 2014 5:55 AM

Collection sur les Biens Communs
 http://www.pearltrees.com/t/biens-communs/id2338048

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6,000 lbs of food on 1/10th acre - Urban Farm - Urban Homestead - Growing Your Own Food

Over 6,000 pounds of food per year, on 1/10 acre located just 15 minutes from downtown Los Angeles. The Dervaes family grows over 400 species of plants, 4,30...

Via Daniel Moura
Suzette Jackson's insight:

the urban homestead, see how this family grows more than enough food to live off and produce for restaurants

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Daniel Moura's curator insight, February 20, 2013 5:44 AM

"Path to Freedom" homestead: living urban doesn't mean living unnaturaly. A great example of urban farm and how you can reduce your ecological footprint

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America's "greenest street" provides a blueprint for sustainable urban development

America's "greenest street" provides a blueprint for sustainable urban development | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

A streetscape that includes natural landscaping, bicycle lanes, wind powered lighting, storm water diversion for irrigation, drought-resistant native plants and innovative “smog-eating” concrete has earned Cermak road in Chicago the title of “greenest Street in America” according to the Chicago Department of Transport (CDOT).

 

Opened in October 2012, the first phase two mile stretch is part of the Blue Island/Cermak Sustainable Streetscape project which was introduced in 2009 with the aim of reducing overall energy usage by 42 percent.


Via Lauren Moss, Daniel Moura
Suzette Jackson's insight:

how does your street rate? compare it to the 'greenest street in America?

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Mercor's curator insight, February 4, 2013 6:42 AM

Scooped by Lauren Moss

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Small Living Spaces Pack in a Lot of Benefits

Small Living Spaces Pack in a Lot of Benefits | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
Is a big house really a step up? Small living spaces offer many personal, financial, and environmental benefits - no shipping container required!

Via Flora Moon
Suzette Jackson's insight:

While thesis an American based info graphic it is still highly relevant for Australia as we see the area required per person jump Australia!

The size of your home needs to relate to the size of the occupants/family and allow for zoning / flexibility and onsite generation of resources.

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Grow your own - The Australia Institute

Grow your own - The Australia Institute | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it

Australia’s high rate of urbanisation means that most people experience a significant disconnect between their food production and consumption. Over several decades, suburban gardens have ceased to be major sites of food production and Australians reportedly have a declining understanding and appreciation of how their food is grown. Recent years have seen a renewed interest in the quality, provenance, freshness and price of food, driving a companion interest in Australians growing their own food at home or in community gardens.

 

This paper examines who is currently growing their own food, the motivations and barriers in relation to home and community gardening and the potential for home grown food to deliver benefits such as health and social inclusion improvements and to protect food security. The research is based on a literature review, a survey of 1,390 households across Australia and interviews with experts and community gardeners.


Via Good Food Projects
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How we will live: More green, more urban, more efficient

How we will live: More green, more urban, more efficient | Innate Ecology | Scoop.it
The neighborhoods of 2039 will feel more like cityscapes with environmentally friendly, energy efficient amenities and people living closer to their jobs.

How we live is indicative of who we are, and both are changing. As city planners look to the next quarter century, they must factor in three profound shifts in modern society: information technology, mobility and climate.

As with everything else, technology is changing not just how we live and work, but the cities where we live and work. That technology has already affected social change, making younger generations more mobile and urban. Technology has also offered new solutions to some of the biggest challenges for 21st century urban planners—climate change and how we make our neighborhoods as green as possible.

 

More at the link...


Via Lauren Moss
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Catherine Devin's curator insight, April 7, 2014 9:00 AM

Il y a besoin de réfléchir à comment  intégrer les projets de durabilité en milieu urbain et les projets technologiques. On présente souvent ces derniers comme la solution aux questions posées par les premiers; c'est vrai, comme l'indiquent des observateurs du Green IT mais seulement si elles sont aussi élaborées avec une démarche RSE Au final, la technologie serait plutôt une  des composantes de nos vies futures apportant son lot de solutions et de questions... à nous de pousser à ses côtés aussi d'autres solutions  : nouvelles attitudes, nouveaux usages pour une ville durable... mais aussi désirable et humaine ?