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Immunology for University Students
Resources and Material for Lecturers and Students - Immunology (University level)
Curated by Alfredo Corell
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Intestinal epithelial cells: regulators of barrier function and immune homeostasis

Intestinal epithelial cells: regulators of barrier function and immune homeostasis | Immunology for University Students | Scoop.it
Nature Reviews Immunology 14, 141 (2014).
doi:10.1038/nri3608
Authors: Lance W.
Alfredo Corell's insight:

The abundance of innate and adaptive immune cells that reside together with trillions of beneficial commensal microorganisms in the mammalian gastrointestinal tract requires barrier and regulatory mechanisms that conserve host–microbial interactions and tissue homeostasis. This homeostasis depends on the diverse functions of intestinal epithelial cells (IECs), which include the physical segregation of commensal bacteria and the integration of microbial signals. Hence, IECs are crucial mediators of intestinal homeostasis that enable the establishment of an immunological environment permissive to colonization by commensal bacteria. In this Review, we provide a comprehensive overview of how IECs maintain host–commensal microbial relationships and immune cell homeostasis in the intestine.


Free download with registration: http://www.nature.com/nri/journal/v14/n3/pdf/nri3608.pdf 

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Immune-suppressing cells explain newborn infection vulnerability

Immune-suppressing cells explain newborn infection vulnerability | Immunology for University Students | Scoop.it
Cells that allow good bacteria to safely colonize the intestines of newborns may cause immune suppression, explaining why they are vulnerable to infection, researchers say.
Alfredo Corell's insight:

The researchers note that the process of CD71+ immune suppression is vital for the intestines to build up healthy bacterial colonization, and this is more important than the threat of neonatal infection.

However, they emphasize that further research is warranted in order to create new strategies for the protection of newborn infants against infection while still allowing the CD71+ cells to assist in developing healthy intestines.

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The Fascinating System of Eye-induced Immune Regulation

The Fascinating System of Eye-induced Immune Regulation | Immunology for University Students | Scoop.it
The immune privilege of the eye is a widely recognized but frequently oversimplified concept.
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Immunology in the Gut Mucosa: a great Nature Immunology animation!!!!

Immunology in the Gut Mucosa: a great Nature Immunology animation!!!! | Immunology for University Students | Scoop.it
Nature Immunology is a multidisciplinary journal that publishes papers of the highest quality and significance in all areas of immunology. Priority is given to work that provides fundamental insight into the workings of the immune system.
Alfredo Corell's insight:

The gut mucosa is the largest and most dynamic immunological environment of the body. It's often the first point of pathogen exposure and many microbes use it as a beachhead into the rest of the body. The gut immune system therefore needs to be ready to respond to pathogens but at the same time it is constantly exposed to innocuous environmental antigens, food particles and commensal microflora which need to be tolerated. Misdirected immune responses to harmless antigens are the underlying cause of food allergies and debilitating conditions such as inflammatory bowel disease. This animation introduces the key cells and molecular players involved in gut immunohomeostasis and disease.

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Immunology in the skin (and psoriasis) - a new video by Nature Immunology

Immunology in the skin (and psoriasis) - a new video by Nature Immunology | Immunology for University Students | Scoop.it
The skin is the body's main barrier against physical insults and microbial pathogens. Diverse and functionally specialized subsets of immune cells in the ski...
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a remarkable video about skin immune system and pathogenesis in the particular case of psoriasis.

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Mucosal Immunity: 4 video-animation series

http://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Image: https://docs.google.com/file/d/0B8Ss3-wJfHrpZVVjM19yTnVJZTA/edit?usp=sharing
Alfredo Corell's insight:

From Armando Hasudungan

 

Introduction: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H-0S7R0cn6U&list=PLAB2FC119A2CA3C57&index=24

Part 1: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2Um45kC3-9A&list=PLAB2FC119A2CA3C57&index=25

Part 2: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2XuHldHTNM&list=PLAB2FC119A2CA3C57&index=26

Part 3 (IgA): http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q24x1r2rfzQ

 

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Regulation of intestinal homeostasis and immunity with probiotic lactobacilli

Regulation of intestinal homeostasis and immunity with probiotic lactobacilli | Immunology for University Students | Scoop.it
Peter van Baarlen, Jerry M. Wells, Michiel Kleerebezem. The gut microbiota provide important stimuli to the human innate and adaptive immune system and co-mediate metabolic and immune homeostasis.
Alfredo Corell's insight:

The gut microbiota provide important stimuli to the human innate and adaptive immune system and co-mediate metabolic and immune homeostasis. Probiotic bacteria can be regarded as part of the natural human microbiota, and have been associated with improving homeostasis, albeit with different levels of success. Composition of microbiota, probiotic strain identity, and host genetic differences may account for differential modulation of immune responses by probiotics. Here, we review the mechanisms of immunomodulating capacities of specific probiotic strains, the responses they can induce in the host, and how microbiota and genetic differences between individuals may co-influence host responses and immune homeostasis.

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ScienceDirect.com - Immunity - Innate Lymphoid Cell Interactions with Microbiota: Implications for Intestinal Health and Disease

ScienceDirect.com - Immunity - Innate Lymphoid Cell Interactions with Microbiota: Implications for Intestinal Health and Disease | Immunology for University Students | Scoop.it

Innate Lymphoid Cell Interactions with Microbiota: Implications for Intestinal Health and Disease

Gregory F. Sonnenberg1, , ,David Artis1, 2, ,

1 Department of Microbiology and Institute for Immunology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA2 Department of Pathobiology, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.immuni.2012.10.003

 

The mammalian intestine harbors trillions of beneficial commensal bacteria that are essential for the development of the immune system and for maintenance of physiologic processes in multiple organs. However, numerous chronic infectious, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases in humans have been associated with alterations in the composition or localization of commensal bacteria that result in dysregulated host-commensal bacteria relationships. The mammalian immune system plays an essential role in regulating the acquisition, composition, and localization of commensal bacteria in the intestine. Emerging research has implicated innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) as a critical immune cell population that orchestrates some of these host-commensal bacteria relationships that can impact immunity, inflammation, and tissue homeostasis in the intestine. This review will discuss reciprocal interactions between intestinal commensal bacteria and ILCs in the context of health and disease.

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