Immunology for University Students
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Immunology for University Students
Resources and Material for Lecturers and Students - Immunology (University level)
Curated by Alfredo Corell
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Unraveling the Influence of Gut Microbes on the Mind and Mood

Unraveling the Influence of Gut Microbes on the Mind and Mood | Immunology for University Students | Scoop.it
Within the last decade, the phrase “gut feelings” has taken on a whole new meaning. Traditionally, scientists have focused on the role of the central nervous system in regulating our moods and behaviors, but a paradigm shift is afoot, with new research revealing a unique role of our gut...
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A seminal study published in 2004 provided some of the first evidence of bidirectional interaction between gut bacteria and the brain, demonstrating that germ-free (GF) mice without commensal microorganisms have an exaggerated response to stress, accompanied by altered brain chemistry and elevated stress hormones, which could be normalized by administration of a single type of bacterium, Bifidobacterium infantis (Sudo N et al. J Physiol. 2004;558[pt 1]:263-275).

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Regulation of intestinal homeostasis and immunity with probiotic lactobacilli

Regulation of intestinal homeostasis and immunity with probiotic lactobacilli | Immunology for University Students | Scoop.it
Peter van Baarlen, Jerry M. Wells, Michiel Kleerebezem. The gut microbiota provide important stimuli to the human innate and adaptive immune system and co-mediate metabolic and immune homeostasis.
Alfredo Corell's insight:

The gut microbiota provide important stimuli to the human innate and adaptive immune system and co-mediate metabolic and immune homeostasis. Probiotic bacteria can be regarded as part of the natural human microbiota, and have been associated with improving homeostasis, albeit with different levels of success. Composition of microbiota, probiotic strain identity, and host genetic differences may account for differential modulation of immune responses by probiotics. Here, we review the mechanisms of immunomodulating capacities of specific probiotic strains, the responses they can induce in the host, and how microbiota and genetic differences between individuals may co-influence host responses and immune homeostasis.

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Immunomodulation by Gut Microbiota: Role of Toll-Like Receptor Expressed by T Cells

Immunomodulation by Gut Microbiota: Role of Toll-Like Receptor Expressed by T Cells http://t.co/ZTBwPJrLpH
Alfredo Corell's insight:

A close relationship exists between gut microbiota and immune responses. An imbalance of this relationship can determine local and systemic immune diseases. In fact the immune system plays an essential role in maintaining the homeostasis with the microbiota that normally resides in the gut, while, at the same time, the gut microbiota influences the immune system, modulating number and function of effector and regulatory T cells. To achieve this aim, mutual regulation between immune system and microbiota is achieved through several mechanisms, including the engagement of toll-like receptors (TLRs), pathogen-specific receptors expressed on numerous cell types. TLRs are able to recognize ligands from commensal or pathogen microbiota to maintain the tolerance or trigger the immune response. In this review, we summarize the latest evidences about the role of TLRs expressed in adaptive T cells, to understand how the immune system promotes intestinal homeostasis, fights invasion by pathogens, and is modulated by the intestinal microbiota.
Read more at http://ivancevichmd.blogspot.com/2014/07/immunomodulation-by-gut-microbiota-role.html#uJoxPLxwCzjbUuEo.99

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