Infotext sources for middle school
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Infotext sources for middle school
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Wildwood Chronicles: Blog of Colin & Carson Meloy

Wildwood Chronicles: Blog of Colin & Carson Meloy | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
Wildwood Blog | Wildwood Chronicles
Chanelle Savich's insight:

Author blog: this one is best as a possible resource for finding contests the kids might enter. They're all about selling their books, not pontificating on other random topics which might really be of interest to readers, unfortunately. They had a map contest related to their books; kids would have liked that. Maybe other contests in the future?

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How to Give a Killer Presentation

How to Give a Killer Presentation | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
Business management magazine, blogs, case studies, articles, books, and webinars from Harvard Business Review, addressing today's topics and challenges in business management.
Chanelle Savich's insight:

Another great article by TED. Why not use this as a close reading article and then use the advice to give a killer presentation to the class?

 

Good for Communications -- drawing CCSS LA targets into a specialty class.

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Out of the Dust | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress

Library of Congress additional resources for teachers.
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Cameron Russell: Looks aren't everything. Believe me, I'm a model. | Video on TED.com

Cameron Russell admits she won “a genetic lottery”: she's tall, pretty and an underwear model. But don't judge her by her looks. In this fearless talk, she takes a wry look at the industry that had her looking highly seductive at barely 16-years-old.
Chanelle Savich's insight:

This talk is thought-provoking as well as rich in interesting images and contrasts. Students could respond to it in a number of different ways: their thoughts on beauty, on legacy and racial/gender stereotypes, on modeling and exploitation, etc. 8th and up because of the sexy images, although they were most likely published in a regular magazine! 

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For a Sick Friend: First, Do No Harm

For a Sick Friend: First, Do No Harm | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
Conversing with the ill can be awkward, but keeping a few simple commandments makes a huge difference, writes Letty Cottin Pogrebin.
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8 talks about learning from failure | TED Blog

8 talks about learning from failure | TED Blog | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
Allan Savory isn’t afraid to own up to the “greatest blunder” of his life in this incredible talk from TED2013. Others who've done the same.
Chanelle Savich's insight:

Use this talk (or the others following it) as a writing prompt and discussion starter -- the writing could be open ended: narrative (mistake I've made), info/explanatory about biomes and trying to change them or about elephants; argument about human interference with nature . . . 

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Mice with up to 200 tumors completely cured of lung cancer using a gene therapy inhibiting c-myc

Mice with up to 200 tumors completely cured of lung cancer using a gene therapy inhibiting c-myc | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it

Vall d’Hebron Institute of Oncology (VHIO) scientists eradicate lung tumours in a pre-clinical mouse model. Previous studies had already shown that Myc was a key protein in tumour development and had established how to inhibit Myc through gene therapy. The protein Myc is involved in the development of diverse tumours and so Myc-targeted therapy could make a positive contribution to the therapeutic options for different types of cancer.

 

The study has managed to eliminate mouse lung tumours by inhibiting Myc, a protein that plays a key role in the development of many different tumours. The results, published in the journal Genes & Development, confirm that repeated, long-term treatment does not cause side effects. Even more importantly, no resistance to treatment has been encountered, which is one of the biggest concerns with anticancer therapies. These results show that anticancer therapies based on Myc inhibition are a safe, effective therapeutic option in new drug development.

 

Myc is a protein that plays a big role in regulating gene transcription and it is involved in cell processes such as proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis (programmed cell death - an essential part of regenerating tissues and eliminating damaged cells). It acts as a regulator gene that controls the expression of some 15% of human genes. However, imbalances in this protein bring about uncontrolled cell growth which in turn can lead to the onset of cancer in different tissues. In fact, deregulated Myc is found in most tumours, including cervical, breast, colon, lung and stomach cancer.

 

The work conducted by the Mouse Models of Cancer Therapy group at the VHIO, led by Dr Laura Soucek, shows that Myc can be controlled and inhibited through a mutant called Omomyc that hijacks Myc and prevents it from acting. “Even if we clearly identify a mechanism behind tumour development, it is still extremely complex to pinpoint how to intervene in cells' internal machinery or modify genetic processes,” explained Dr Soucek. “We have found a way to inhibit Myc through Omomyc,” she continued. “We induced Omomyc expression in mice through gene therapy and managed to activate and deactivate it by administering an antibiotic to the mice in their drinking water.”

 

In the study, multiple lung tumours were induced in the mouse (up to 200 tumours in each individual) and Myc inhibition episodes were achieved by activating Omomyc expression for 4-weeks, followed by 4-week rest periods. This therapy - known as metronomic therapy - was maintained for more than a year, regularly checking tumour progress in each mouse. All mice became tumour free after the first inhibition period, but 63% of cases then relapsed. After the second Myc inhibition period, only 11% of the initial tumours reappeared. According to Dr Soucek, “the most important finding was that there were no signs of resistance to treatment. This is one of the biggest disadvantages of many anticancer therapies: the disease develops resistance and can return even more aggressively.”

 

Finally, only two remaining tumours were found after more than one year of treatment among the mice that received eight inhibition and rest cycles. Dr Soucek found that Omomyc expression had been suppressed in these tumours, and this was the only adaptive mechanism that mice developed to treatment. “These results are hugely positive for us, because one year of life in a mouse is equivalent to almost 40 human years. The fact that the results are maintained over time, that there is no tumour relapse and no resistance, suggests that Myc-targeted therapy may offer an unprecedented way forward."

 

These encouraging results provide sufficient scientific evidence to consider taking the next step: inhibiting Myc in patients. “Now our challenge for the future is to make Myc inhibition feasible from a pharmacological point of view, so that it can be administered, and done so safely. This will be the last step before designing clinical trials with Myc inhibitors,” explained Dr Soucek. “We're so excited about reaching this turning point and I am quite certain that it will change the course of cancer therapy, despite there being a long road ahead.”


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Chanelle Savich's insight:

for students looking for PRO articles on animal based research.

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Watch "Joshua Prager: My personal half-life" Video at TED2013 #TEDTalentSearch

Watch "Joshua Prager: My personal half-life" Video at TED2013 #TEDTalentSearch | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
Journalist Joshua Prager was a senior feature writer for The Wall Street Journal for 8 years. He is also the author of "The Echoing Green."
[Note: We want you to see these talks exactly as they happened!
Chanelle Savich's insight:

Pair with the blog "In search of the man who broke my neck."

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National Women's History Project

National Women's History Project | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
Chanelle Savich's insight:

Resources related to women's roles, history, biographies, speeches, etc. Pathbreakers, performers, authors, and presenters are highlighted.

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Langston Hughes: The Battle of the Landlord

Langston Hughes: The Battle of the Landlord | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
Langston Hughes: The Battle of the Landlord
Chanelle Savich's insight:

The landlord makes no effort to correct the derelict conditions of the apartment despite repeated requests, but when the rent is due, he's all over that. What? You won't pay? Jail time for the black tenant--and newspaper coverage about the mistreatment of the landlord by the tenant as well.

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: Andrew McAfee at TED2013

: Andrew McAfee at TED2013 | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
The rise of droids Andrew McAfee starts his TED2013 talk by making a forecast: "In the world that we're creating very quickly, we're going to see more and more things that look like science fiction and fewer and fewer things that look like jobs.
Chanelle Savich's insight:

A good thing for 8th graders to be thinking about . . . 

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TED To This Day Project: Bullying

TED To This Day Project: Bullying | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it

In case you haven’t seen it yet, To This Day is a beautiful collaborative project that combines spoken word poetry and a flurry of eclectic animations to raise awareness about bullying.

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Interview with Raina Telgemeier | Teenreads

Interview with Raina Telgemeier | Teenreads | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it

One of the most moving and beloved graphic novels (graphic memoir, actually) to come out in the past few years was Raina Telgemeier’s Smile, the story of growing up, losing and making friends, and discovering one’s authentic identity…all because of a little (well, a lot of) orthodontia."

Chanelle Savich's insight:

Teen Reads has a lot of author interviews about popular books, why they were written, how they were inspired, etc.

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Blog | Frank Beddor Official Website

Blog | Frank Beddor Official Website | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
Chanelle Savich's insight:

Why not use author blogs as mentor texts? Interesting articles, not all written by Beddor, though.

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Infographic: Hackers Create An Amazing, Illegal Portrait Of The Internet

Infographic: Hackers Create An Amazing, Illegal Portrait Of The Internet | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it

It wasn’t malicious. The file itself was the size of a small JPEG. It was given the absolute lowest priority. And it was set to self-destruct if anything went wrong. But this small file allowed one single hacker to measure the Internet activity of nearly half a million connected devices around the world, then share the results with everyone.

How was this even possible? The "hacker" barely hacked anything. In reality, they gained access to all these systems because each had the default "root" set as a password. With this access in hand, they ran several tests focusing on Internet structure and activity. And what they created from all this data is a spectacular map that captures a day in the life of the Internet (and all of its users).


Via Lauren Moss
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Sakis Koukouvis's comment, May 11, 2013 3:17 AM
Wonderful
Nacho Vega's curator insight, May 11, 2013 12:18 PM

Creative power: hacking at the end of the world!

 

Using "root" as universal key :))

Kristin Newton's curator insight, May 11, 2013 10:10 PM

The Internet is connecting us day by day in amazing ways.

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Boston bombings: Social media spirals out of control

Boston bombings: Social media spirals out of control | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
Over the last few days, thousands of people have taken to the Internet to play Sherlock Holmes.
Chanelle Savich's insight:

7th or 8th graders can respond to this article about the negatives of social media regarding the Boston Marathon bombing. How did the author support his claims? Is his argument sound?

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Full List: The World's 100 Most Influential People | TIME.com

Full List: The World's 100 Most Influential People | TIME.com | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
TIME presents its annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world, from artists and leaders to pioneers, titans and icons
Chanelle Savich's insight:

Why not have students read some of these biographies and write about why some should or should not have been included, or argue for a different order?

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For kids | TED Playlists | TED

For kids | TED Playlists | TED | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
Fun, informative talks for curious kids.
Chanelle Savich's insight:

Not all TED Talks are kid- or middle-school appropriate; these 9 are.

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Can limitations make you more creative? Q&A with artist Phil Hansen

Can limitations make you more creative? Q&A with artist Phil Hansen | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
At TED2013, Phil Hansen shares how he "embraced the shake" in his art. Here, we ask him how limitations help creativity.
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Joshua Prager at TED2013: In search for the man who destroyed my body

Joshua Prager at TED2013: In search for the man who destroyed my body | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
At TED2013 Joshua Prager tells the stunning story of returning to Jerusalem to search for the man who left him a paraplegic 21 years before.
Chanelle Savich's insight:

Moving from the idea that you deserve the life you imagined for yourself to the idea that you are who you are and you've been shaped by your experiences; moving from wanting someone to take responsibility for the bad that's befallen you to realizing that others are imperfect but not evil and it's time to move on.

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Picture Books – Zinn Education Project

Picture Books – Zinn Education Project | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it

The Zinn Education Project is a collaborative effort by Teaching for Change and Rethinking Schools

Chanelle Savich's insight:

Wide variety of fiction, non-fiction and poetry written at the elementary, upper-elementary and middle school levels but in a picture book format on the general themes of social justice and organizing for change. The specific incidents range from fiction/fantasy (Click-Clack-Moo: cows that type) to events from the 1800's to events from the 1970's. India, America, women, African Americans, war, labor, etc.

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Gwendolyn Brooks: The Lovers of the Poor

Gwendolyn Brooks: The Lovers of the Poor | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
Gwendolyn Brooks: The Lovers of the Poor
Chanelle Savich's insight:

Chicago-area imagery; 1963; the rich ladies come to help the poor, but the poor don't live up to their expectations.

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Embrace the shake: Phil Hansen at TED2013

Embrace the shake: Phil Hansen at TED2013 | Infotext sources for middle school | Scoop.it
Phil Hansen thought his artistic dreams were over when he developed a hand shake. At TED2013, he shares how he embraced it—to great end.
Chanelle Savich's insight:

Being happy with less-than-perfection and seeing it as just who you're supposed to be. Very cool.

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