Infotention
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Infotention
Managing attention & information
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Rescooped by Howard Rheingold from Content Curation World
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Curate Your Thoughts and Ideas with Gingko


Via Robin Good
Howard Rheingold's insight:

When I wrote Smart Mobs in 2001, I ended up with pages of text that I had culled, both quotes and my own drafts. I highlighted key passages and then underlined the core of the key passages. I arranged the pages in stacks of related material and created indexes for the stacks on index cards. Then I shuffled the stacks around on my desk. Scrivener has a useful index card view. Gingko combines mindmapping with indexcarding. When trying to organize complex, clumping collections of info, this could be a useful infotention tool -- I haven't tried it yet. 

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M. Edward (Ed) Borasky's comment, September 3, 2013 1:57 PM
Hypercard lives!
Ignasi Alcalde's curator insight, September 4, 2013 1:58 AM

A explorar

Michael Sabah's curator insight, September 4, 2013 5:41 AM

CoCreation Tool for Design Thinking

Rescooped by Howard Rheingold from Content Curation World
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What Is Curation and Why It's So Relevant? [Video]

Robin Good: A great video animation introducing some of the key ideas, dreams and concepts behind content curation.

 

From the video: "One of the most beautiful things about the Internet is this sort of radical discovery, where you start in a place that you are familiar with, that you trust, and then you drill down and down and chase the white rabbit and then you end up in some wonderland you didn't know existed." 

 

The clip includes thoughts from some unique curators, picked and selected by Percolate, the company sponsoring this video. 

 

Inspiring. Insightful. 8/10


Find out more / watch original video: http://vimeo.com/38524181   ;


Via Robin Good
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Rescooped by Howard Rheingold from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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How can we build better filters for growing flows of information?

How can we build better filters for growing flows of information? | Infotention | Scoop.it

 

 

Nicola Bruno, cofounder of Effecinque and a journalist fellow at the Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism at the University of Oxford) goes the startup route "with the intent of being relentless hunters of news and human filters of information."...

 

Heres what got my attention:

 

As the digital flood sweeps into our lives every imaginable kind of information, much of it offering nothing more than a smoke screen to blur or distort our view, figuring this out is crucial.

 

Who or what can help us see beyond the smoke? Will software like Stats Monkey give us reason to believe that we are swimming only in facts with its mechanical certainty? And what will be the role of journalists in a media landscape in which reporters and news items are little more than commodities, and, in the case of reporters, a soon-to-be redundancy?

 

 

http://www.niemanlab.org/2011/09/from-nieman-reports-how-can-we-build-better-filters-for-growing-flows-of-information/


Via janlgordon
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Rescooped by Howard Rheingold from Content Curation World
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Reduce Information Noise Through Social Curation and Collaborative Discovery: Calm Technology

Reduce Information Noise Through Social Curation and Collaborative Discovery: Calm Technology | Infotention | Scoop.it

I learned a great deal about infotention from Robin Good, who foresaw what he called "newsmastering" as a key skill years before it was called "curation." -- Howard

 

 

Robin Good: Among the five digital trends presently shaping the consumer experience economy, according to Macala Wright who first wrote about this on Mashable, there is one that has as its key objective the reduction of "information noise", distractions and approaches to digital communication that make it harder to grasp and understand a message or to complete a key task one is after.

 

It reads like there is more to information curation than people scanning feeds and selecting relevant items to write about.

 

From the original article I have extracted a few passages: "Calm technology refers to applications that cut down on the digital noise of high-volume data to show the user only enough information that he or she needs to complete a task.

 

...It refers to technologies that do not disrupt our workflow.

 

The whole idea is to reduce distractions to our work flow without losing functionality.

 

Calm technology fights against many of the principles of digital marketing: instead of screaming for attention with flashing banner ads, technologies and applications politely take a backseat to the user’s primary focus...

 

...

 

Examples of calm technology can be found in the growing popularity of social curation and discovery.

 

Social product discovery sites such as Lyst, Mulu.Me, Buyosphere, Svpply and Discoveredd are essentially social filters that enable their communities to curate the products that are most relevant to them.

 

Moreover, the rise of interest networks and the idea of following someone who has similar likes and shared interest topics are examples of the principles of calm technology driving user behavior.

 

Google Circles, Pinterest and Chime.In, even location apps such as Sonar, Glancee and Highlight, can all be classified under the “term interest network.”

 

Excellent reading. 8/10

 

Full article: http://fashionablymarketing.me/2012/06/digital-trends-consumer-experience-economy/ ;


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Rescooped by Howard Rheingold from Content Curation World
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The Ability To Extract and Communicate Insight from Data It's Going To Be Huge: McKinsey Quarterly [Video]

The Ability To Extract and Communicate Insight from Data It's Going To Be Huge: McKinsey Quarterly [Video] | Infotention | Scoop.it

Robin Good: In January of 2009 the McKinsey Quarterly published a video interview and a full article entitled "Hal Varian on how the Web challenges managers" in which Google’s chief economist told executives in wired organizations how much they needed a sharper understanding of how technology empowers innovation.

 

In the video, Hal Varian says something that if you are trying to understand the emerging curation trend, is as relevant (if not more) today as three years ago when it was first published:

 

"The ability to take data - to be able to understand it, to process it, to extract value from it, to visualize it, to communicate it's going to be a hugely important skill in the next decades, not only at the professional level but even at the educational level for elementary school kids, for high school kids, for college kids.

 

Because now we really do have essentially free and ubiquitous data.

 

So the complimentary scarce factor is the ability to understand that data and extract value from it.

 

I think statisticians are part of it, but it's just a part.

You also want to be able to visualize the data, communicate the data, and utilize it effectively.

 

But I do think those skills - of being able to access, understand, and communicate the insights you get from data analysis - are going to be extremely important..."

 

Video interview: http://bit.ly/googlehalvarianoncuration 

(go to the section "Workers and managers")

 

You will need to register to read the full original article: http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Hal_Varian_on_how_the_Web_challenges_managers_2286 


Via Robin Good
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janlgordon's comment, January 31, 2012 9:27 AM
This is an excellent piece, as always, thank you Robin!
Robin Good's comment, January 31, 2012 9:55 AM
Thank you Jan, much appreciated!