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Infotention
Managing attention & information
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http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/add-firefoxstyle-rss-feeds-foxish-google-chrome/

"Do you love Chrome, but miss having live RSS feeds in your bookmark toolbar and menus? Foxish brings this famous Firefox feature to Chrome, and it’s only a click away. Firefox has, for ages, offered built-in support for RSS feeds. Showing up essentially as folders in Firefox’s bookmark menu and toolbar, RSS feeds in Firefox make it easy to keep up with blogs and other websites that regularly update.
So it was strange when Google Chrome launched and they didn’t include this feature. Four years later and this hasn’t changed. Open an RSS feed with Chrome and you’ll be offered a variety of web-based RSS readers, like Google Reader, but not the option to add the feed to your bookmarks.
Many people think this was a bad move by Google and the Chrome team, even if they switched from Firefox to Chrome. Do you agree with them? If so, then you’re in luck! Foxish, an extension for Chrome, lets you put your feeds where you want them – with your bookmarks."

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We Don't Need a Digital Sabbath, We Need More Time

We Don't Need a Digital Sabbath, We Need More Time | Infotention | Scoop.it

"The reason is that if we allow ourselves to blame the technology for distracting us from our children or connecting with our communities, then the solution is simply to put away the technology. We absolve ourselves of the need to create social, political, and, sure, technological structures that allow us to have the kinds of relationships we want with the people around us. We need to realize that at the core of our desire for a Sabbath isn't a need to escape the blinking screens of our electronic world, but the ways that work and other obligations have intruded upon our lives and our relationships.

We can begin by mimicking the Sabbath in small, by recognizing that by dedicating time to one activity or one person, without interruption from gadgets, work, or other people, will help us slow down and connect. We can use our gadgets to do this -- a long talk on the phone is the most obvious way -- or we can leave them out of it.

Such minimal steps won't build something profound like Heschel's "palace in time." They'll result in something smaller -- something more like little forts in time. And there, in these forts, we can take shelter, replenish our resources, and gear up for the battles of the week ahead."

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A Dashboard To Visualize Any Data (Analytics, Sales, Social Stats..) – Cyfe

A Dashboard To Visualize Any Data (Analytics, Sales, Social Stats..) – Cyfe | Infotention | Scoop.it

"As people who are designing/developing and/or managing web projects, we usually pay a lot of importance to metrics and their trends -website statistics, Twitter follower numbers, the number of sales of a product and so- to better analyze if things are performing as expected.

All these data are usually behind different applications/interfaces; Google Analytics keeps the stats, the number of comments are in the WordPress admin, leads can be viewed from SalesForce or invoices are in Freshbooks. And, there can be some others like the data in custom apps.

Logging into each of them to get a snapshot of everything usually takes a lot of time. And, this is what Cyfe is about.

Cyfe is a hosted dashboard with a simple and good-looking interface that allows us to view any data from a single place."

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Am I wasting my time organizing email? A study of email refinding (PDF)

http://people.ucsc.edu/~swhittak/papers/chi2011_refinding_email_camera_ready.pdf

 

"We all spend time every day looking for information in our
email, yet we know little about this refinding process. Some
users expend considerable preparatory effort creating
complex folder structures to promote effective refinding.
However modern email clients provide alternative
opportunistic methods for access, such as search and
threading, that promise to reduce the need to manually
prepare."

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Improving Mental Focus IQ Matrix Mind Map IQ Matrix

Improving Mental Focus IQ Matrix Mind Map IQ Matrix | Infotention | Scoop.it
Improving Mental Focus IQ Matrix takes a detailed look at how you can develop your ability to focus more effectively on your goals, tasks and routines in order to boost your productivity and concentration throughout the day.
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In Which I Officially Declare RSS Is Truly Alive And Well. | John Battelle's Search Blog

"I promise, for at least 18 months, to not bring this topic up again. But I do feel the need to report to all you RSS lovin’ freaks out there that the combined interactions on my two posts – 680 and still counting – have exceeded the reach of my RSS feed (which clocked in at a miserable 664 the day I posted the first missive).

And as I said in my original post:

If I get more comments and tweets on this post than I have “reach” by Google Feedburner status, well, that’s enough for me to pronounce RSS Alive and Well (by my own metric of nodding along, of course). If it’s less than 664, I’m sorry, RSS is Well And Truly Dead. And it’s all your fault."

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How to Prioritize When Everything Is Important

How to Prioritize When Everything Is Important | Infotention | Scoop.it

"You know that sinking feeling you have when there's too much on your plate? When you try to tackle your tasks by priority, but it feels like everything's important? Don't get overwhelmed—it's a problem that everyone faces at some point or another, and while it's difficult to skillfully juggle multiple priorities and competing responsibilities, it's not impossible. Here's how.
It just so happens that there's a career that focuses specifically on juggling competing tasks and priorities: These people are called project managers. And as luck would have it, I was a full time PM for many years, PMP-certified and everything. In that time, I learned a number of helpful tricks that can help you manage your workload at the office as well as your ever-growing list of to-dos at home, with your family, or with your friends. Here's how you can apply some of those techniques to your everyday life."

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SwiftRiver Throws a Lifeline to People Drowning in Information – The Ushahidi Blog

SwiftRiver Throws a Lifeline to People Drowning in Information – The Ushahidi Blog | Infotention | Scoop.it

"There’s a problem that constantly plagues us in this day of information overload, and that is the ability to sift the stream of incoming information into the bits that are valuable from those that aren’t. It’s a tough issue that we’ve been working on at Ushahidi, and re-working, a solution on for a while now. Our solution is called SwiftRiver.

SwiftRiver is a free and open source intelligence platform that helps people curate and make sense of large amounts of information in a short amount of time. In practice, SwiftRiver enables the filtering and verification of real-time data from channels such as SMS, Email, Twitter and RSS feeds. It’s especially useful for organizations who need to sort their data by their unique expectations of authority and accuracy, as opposed to popularity. Such organizations include journalists, community based-organizations, PR/marketing, emergency responders, election monitoring groups and more."

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Visual Complexity: Mapping Patterns for the Information Age

Visual Complexity: Mapping Patterns for the Information Age | Infotention | Scoop.it

"This month marks the highly anticipated release of Visual Complexity: Mapping Patterns of Information — a rigorously researched, beautifully designed, thoughtfully curated anthology of the world’s most compelling work at the intersection of these two relatively nascent yet increasingly powerful techno-cultural phenomena, network science and information visualization."

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Twitter acquisition confirms that curation is the future

Twitter acquisition confirms that curation is the future | Infotention | Scoop.it

"Twitter's purchase of Summify, which delivered an email summary of interesting links from a user's social networks, shows Twitter is trying to get smarter about how it filters the flood of information users are exposed to."

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Content Rivers and Information Gluttony | The People Behind the Paper.lis

Content Rivers and Information Gluttony | The People Behind the Paper.lis | Infotention | Scoop.it

"Content doesn't have a season -- the feast is all year round" 

 

Nice article by Evren Kiefer talking about information overload and how we streamline our diet. Or can we? 


Via Kelly Hungerford
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Beth Kanter's comment, January 21, 2012 1:20 PM
BTW, I like how you frame the "meaning overwhelm." Even if we are power users of aggregation tools and newsmastering tools to bring us more on target content for our needs - we can still suffer from this.

It is the act of going back and forth between scanning quickly - and then going in for a deep dive and reflection. I watch the stream. I check things out and if I find something that is like "wow" - my audience would love this - or "wow" slightly different take or framing on the topic - then I add in my collection,think about it, and share.

The thing I'm trying to fight - in part because I curate many different topics. I tend to focus on different streams of keywords or sources for particular topics. But I might find something through serendipity that is on another topic I curate and it is good, but I'm not focusing on that topic now. So, sometimes I grab and have in a holding place until I look at it in more depth.

All this to ask you about:
What is your practice for curating multiple topics?
What do YOU do to avoid meaning overload?
janlgordon's comment, January 21, 2012 5:06 PM
Beth Kanter

For me, it all begins with managing my attention and establishing criteria for selecting content that aligns with my brand message and my purpose for being online. This is my compass. My focus for the day that fits this framework and everything flows from there. I love Howard Rhinegold’s work and the mindmap is brilliant. I’m finding these to be excellent resources in helping me to refine this process and I feel I'm definitely on the right track.


I have some quiet time before I ever go to the computer and focus on my agenda for the day. It’s like going into a library. Everything you could ever want is there but if you don’t have a hypothesis, you can drown in the sea of knowledge and information.

I cover lots of topics but there’s a recurring theme that connects them and it revolves around the evolving world of curation and the many forms it takes; how we have to learn to curate our selection not only of content and information but activity such as social networking as well. It's learning to manage my time and evaluate how I spend it. I ask myself if I do this, will it take me towards or away from my overall plan, the answer always gets me back to where I need to be.

As you know, we can schedule priorities and life comes charging in and sometimes I have to shift to do something that needs to be taken care of. Even if this happens, I can get back to my theme for the day at some point. I don't hold the reigns too tightly on this, it's just there to keep me grounded. If I find something as you say serendipitously and it’s off my daily plan, if it’s really a "wow", (again, here I've established some criteria for this, otherwise, I'd find many wows throughout the day), I stop and pay attention to it to see if it’s something I should work on. For me, there’s a certain rhythm to all of this and intuition plays a part. It takes practice and trusting yourself and not over-thinking things.

As for meaning overload, there are two things I will do If a piece is particularly heady or difficult to read, I will search for the simple thread that relates to the message I am seeking to put out to my audience. The other aspect is more simple. If I feel that my head is just too full, I have to step away for a few minutes, take a few deep breaths, maybe grab a drink of water. Sometimes meaning overload is just brain overload, and I really need to know when to step away and find my way back.
Kelly Hungerford's comment, January 22, 2012 5:16 AM
Thanks for sharing, Howard.
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Introduction to Information Retrieval

Introduction to Information Retrieval | Infotention | Scoop.it

"This is the companion website for the following book.


Christopher D. Manning, Prabhakar Raghavan and Hinrich Schütze, Introduction to Information Retrieval, Cambridge University Press. 2008.


You can order this book at CUP, at your local bookstore or on the internet. The best search term to use is the ISBN: 0521865719.

The book aims to provide a modern approach to information retrieval from a computer science perspective. It is based on a course we have been teaching in various forms at Stanford University and at the University of Stuttgart."

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Open Source Intelligence Meets Real-Time News and Data Curation: SwiftRiver

Open Source Intelligence Meets Real-Time News and Data Curation: SwiftRiver | Infotention | Scoop.it

SwiftRiver is a free and open-source intelligence platform that helps people curate and make sense of large amounts of information in a short amount of time.

 

In practice, SwiftRiver enables the filtering and verification of real-time data from channels such as SMS, email, Twitter and RSS feeds.

 

It's especially useful for organizations that need to sort their data by their unique expectations of authority and accuracy, as opposed to popularity.

 

SwiftRiver allows you to discover, filter and present the information you want.

 

In the context of SwiftRiver, we call these things "droplets." For example, common droplets in the river are tweets, Facebook updates, and blog posts. SwiftRiver looks at a droplet, it determines all its attributes. For example, if SwiftRiver looks at a tweet, it can determine things like location, time, author and meaning (in the form of keywords).

 

Once SwiftRiver analyzes all the droplets, you then have the ability to filter them down from that torrential river to a manageable stream.

 

In addition to filtering, you can run different analyses on them, helping you get the "big picture" of your set of droplets.

 

Types of stories / output formats:

Text
Maps
Timeline
Graphs, Charts, Heatmaps
Gallery: Photos, Video, Audio

 

It's a standalone application that anyone can access and use by itself, but it also answers our users' need for a faster, more nimble way to manage information flow on their deployments.

 

..the beta will be available in mid-December (three weeks) for the community first, then for the general review.

Sneak peak via screenshot: http://blog.ushahidi.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/11/Screen-Shot-2011-10-27-at-4.46.36-PM.png 

 

Full article: http://www.pbs.org/idealab/2011/12/swiftriver-throws-a-lifeline-to-people-drowning-in-information340.html 

More info: http://ushahidi.com/products/swiftriver-platform  

 

(Curated by Robin Good)


Via Robin Good
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The Information Diet - Introduction

"http://informationdiet.com -- Introduction to the concepts behind The Information Diet, a new book by Clay Johnson. The Information Diet makes the case that it's time we started being as selective with the information we consume as we are the food that we eat, then describes what a healthy diet and healthy habits look like."

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Excerpt from The Information Diet, by Clay Johnson - Boing Boing

Excerpt from The Information Diet, by Clay Johnson - Boing Boing | Infotention | Scoop.it

"The modern human animal spends upwards of 11 hours out of every 24 in a state of constant consumption. Not eating, but gorging on information ceaselessly spewed from the screens and speakers we hold dear. Just as we have grown morbidly obese on sugar, fat, and flour—so, too, have we become gluttons for texts, instant messages, emails, RSS feeds, downloads, videos, status updates, and tweets.

We're all battling a storm of distractions, buffeted with notifications and tempted by tasty tidbits of information. And just as too much junk food can lead to obesity, too much junk information can lead to cluelessness. The Information Diet shows you how to thrive in this information glut—what to look for, what to avoid, and how to be selective. In the process, author Clay Johnson explains the role information has played throughout history, and why following his prescribed diet is essential for everyone who strives to be smart, productive, and sane."

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Rise Above the Information Deluge. Effective Visualization and Information Management

PersonalBrain Webinar registration: Frebruary 15, 2012, 11 AM -12:00 PM 

"We’re all connected to a vast sea of information: twitter, email, news and social networking sites, blogs and corporate portals …But with all this information at our fingertips it begs the question: are we getting smarter with all this data or just bogged down?

With PersonalBrain you can create large networks of information that match your style of thought, finally putting you in control of the deluge of information, instead of it controlling you.

In this must see webinar we’ll cover strategies to master information overload so you can actually leverage relevant information sources and capture your best knowledge."

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Scholar H-Index Calculator :: Componenti aggiuntivi per Firefox

Scholar H-Index Calculator :: Componenti aggiuntivi per Firefox | Infotention | Scoop.it

"This useful Firefox addon will automatically display some of the most known citation indices (h-index, g-index, e-index) for any author, when querying on Google Scholar."

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This Chart Shows That Information Overload At Work Is Literally Hurting Our Brains

This Chart Shows That Information Overload At Work Is Literally Hurting Our Brains | Infotention | Scoop.it

"According to a study by LexisNexis, 57% of U.S. workers say that since the economic downturn, the amount of information they have to process has significantly increased. Another 73% report that search engines give them access to huge amounts of information but don’t help them prioritize their work. And even when workers aren’t sifting through search results, they’re under a barrage of other information competing for their attention. News and updates are constantly pushed to workers over the Internet, whether they like it or not. A study at Temple University found too much information leads people to make stupid mistakes and bad choices due to a drop in activity in the dorsolateral PFC region of the brain. The study also found that “the brain’s emotion regions — previously held in check by the dorsolateral PFC — run as wild as toddlers on a sugar high,” causing anxiety and frustration."

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Paper.li – a nice aggregator and also connector

Paper.li – a nice aggregator and also connector | Infotention | Scoop.it

This is an post by Paper.li publisher Mark Kelly. 

 

 

Mark would like a broad update on things that interest him  -- something more than RSS can offer and something social -- and this  is why he has created his Paper.lis:

 

Benefits for Mark: 

-Paper.li  looks  nice

- it makes scanning and / or in-depth reading more enjoyable

- Paper.li is social:

- it builds relationships be exposing you to                    bloggers you might not be aware of

- it allows you to connect with tweepers who                tweet / are interested in like-minded topics

- exposes himself to new publishers and other              like minded individuals by being featured on               other Paper.lis

- allows you to see other publications friends                 are interested in, opening the door to new                 discovery there.

 

-Mark points out that a publisher can either take a lot of time defining content streams and sources, or little time --it all depends on what you want to get out of the publication. 

 

He has three, and is thinking about a 4th. You? 

 

Kelly

 


Via Kelly Hungerford
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The Ability To Extract and Communicate Insight from Data It's Going To Be Huge: McKinsey Quarterly [Video]

The Ability To Extract and Communicate Insight from Data It's Going To Be Huge: McKinsey Quarterly [Video] | Infotention | Scoop.it

Robin Good: In January of 2009 the McKinsey Quarterly published a video interview and a full article entitled "Hal Varian on how the Web challenges managers" in which Google’s chief economist told executives in wired organizations how much they needed a sharper understanding of how technology empowers innovation.

 

In the video, Hal Varian says something that if you are trying to understand the emerging curation trend, is as relevant (if not more) today as three years ago when it was first published:

 

"The ability to take data - to be able to understand it, to process it, to extract value from it, to visualize it, to communicate it's going to be a hugely important skill in the next decades, not only at the professional level but even at the educational level for elementary school kids, for high school kids, for college kids.

 

Because now we really do have essentially free and ubiquitous data.

 

So the complimentary scarce factor is the ability to understand that data and extract value from it.

 

I think statisticians are part of it, but it's just a part.

You also want to be able to visualize the data, communicate the data, and utilize it effectively.

 

But I do think those skills - of being able to access, understand, and communicate the insights you get from data analysis - are going to be extremely important..."

 

Video interview: http://bit.ly/googlehalvarianoncuration 

(go to the section "Workers and managers")

 

You will need to register to read the full original article: http://www.mckinseyquarterly.com/Hal_Varian_on_how_the_Web_challenges_managers_2286 


Via Robin Good
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janlgordon's comment, January 31, 2012 12:27 PM
This is an excellent piece, as always, thank you Robin!
Robin Good's comment, January 31, 2012 12:55 PM
Thank you Jan, much appreciated!
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Is There a Difference Between Critical Thinking and Information Literacy? | Weiner | Journal of Information Literacy

Is There a Difference Between Critical Thinking and Information Literacy? | Weiner | Journal of Information Literacy | Infotention | Scoop.it

 

 

This suggests that [information literacy] and its associated procedures could significantly augment current instruction in [critical thinking] and indeed, the possibility has been explored by some authors in the current literature. A merging of the two ideas would involve [information literacy] providing tools and techniques in the processing and utilisation of knowledge and [critical thinking] supplying the particulars and interpretations associated with a specific discipline. This type of integration could lead to instructional programs similar in concept and application to those in research methodology where methods from statistics are integrated with the techniques and skills associated with a specific discipline. The development of a curriculum of this type would change functions and perceptions from private, individualised mentation, now associated with [critical thinking], to a more easily learned and practiced process suitable across the breadth of disciplines.

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CURATING FACEBOOK: Finding Meaning in the Noise - Steve Rosenbaum - Steve Rosenbaum - MediaBizBloggers - Jack Myers

CURATING FACEBOOK: Finding Meaning in the Noise - Steve Rosenbaum - Steve Rosenbaum - MediaBizBloggers - Jack Myers | Infotention | Scoop.it

"If you're like me, Facebook is both a blessing and a curse.

As more and more people that I'm connected with join Facebook, the more I find Facebook both valuable and noisy.

The truth is some of my actual friends are folks who I'm glad to be connected with, but I might be happier if I could tone down, or tune out, some aspects of their Facebook Broadcast.

With this in mind, I've developed a solution for how to Curate my Facebook newsfeed. I know the word 'curate' may not be familiar to you in this context, but in the new world of too much data - organizing and filtering information is critically important."

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Google Effects on Memory: Cognitive Consequences of Having Information at Our Fingertip

http://www.wjh.harvard.edu/~wegner/pdfs/science.1207745.full.pdf


"The advent of the Internet, with sophisticated algorithmic search engines, has made accessing information as easy as lifting a finger. No longer do we have to make costly efforts to find the things we want. We can “Google” the old classmate, find articles online, or look up the actor who was on the tip of our tongue. The results of four studies suggest that when faced with difficult questions, people are primed to think about computers and that when people expect to have future access to information, they have lower rates of recall of the information itself and enhanced recall instead for where to access it. The Internet has become a primary form of external or transactive memory, where information is stored collectively outside ourselves."

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To Know, but Not Understand: David Weinberger on Science and Big Data at Farnam Street

To Know, but Not Understand: David Weinberger on Science and Big Data at Farnam Street | Infotention | Scoop.it

"An edited excerpt from David Weinberger’s new book, Too Big to Know, explains how the massive amounts of data necessary to deal with complex phenomena exceed any single brain’s ability to grasp, yet networked science rolls on."

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A Free Web & Mobile App for Reading Comfortably — Readability

A Free Web & Mobile App for Reading Comfortably — Readability | Infotention | Scoop.it
Readability is a web and mobile app that zaps online clutter and saves web articles in a comfortable reading view.
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