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Michael W. Holley » Blog Archive » Writing with Scrivener

Michael W. Holley » Blog Archive » Writing with Scrivener | Infotention | Scoop.it

When working on large writing projects, Scrivener is my tool of choice. Here, one user gets into his use of Scrivener for infotention workflow. -- Howard

 

"I should note that the way I use Scrivener probably isn’t the traditional way of using the app. If you want a more traditional review of it as a writing tool, take a look at Literature and Latte’s Twitter feed, as they have links to a lot of users reviews. For those who don’t know what Scrivener is, it is one the best all-in-one place writing tools. I compare it to a programming IDE (Integrated development environment), but I’m a bit geeky.

I found Scrivener just after they updated to 2.0. I was looking for a solution to manage not only my writing, but also all the random bits of information that help me write."

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Managing attention & information
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Filtering JP Rangaswami – from information deluge to context

Filtering JP Rangaswami – from information deluge to context | Infotention | Scoop.it
I liked JP Rangaswami's series on filtering so much, I decided to filter it.
Howard Rheingold's insight:

JP Rangaswami's thoughtful series of blog posts on the why and how of filtering online info-flows is a fundamental infotention text. Instead of Scooping all seven, I've Scooped this blog post by Jon Reed that summarizes and links to all seven parts.

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The Always-On Trance

"At the TiDaL Shift workshops we build on the principles offered by Pang, Rheingold and others. By examining our current relationship with technology we create practices that lead to a new relationship with technology; one that is based in self-awareness and conscious choice, leading to more spaciousness and freedom in our lives with and beyond technology."

Howard Rheingold's insight:

Eran Globen offers workshops that deal with the attention issues raised in Net Smart, Alex Soo-Young Pang's The Distraction Addiction, and Rebecca Rosen's Atlantic article, "We don't need a digital sabbath, we need more time."

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Reading Like a Computer Reads | DMLcentral

Reading Like a Computer Reads | DMLcentral | Infotention | Scoop.it
Spritz is a startup that wants to change how people read on small screens. The startup has created an app that feeds texts to readers one word at a time, arranged so that their eyes are not "forc[ed]…to spend time moving around the page." You can see a demonstration in this video.
Howard Rheingold's insight:

I have not tried this, but it's definitely on my list. This article is critical of the technique, calling it "reading to get it over with," but I can think of several categories of reading that I could do a quick once-over before drilling down on specific parts: how-to manuals and documents where I know a lot of it but need to dig out specific parts and concentrate on them more slowly; texts that I am considering adding to a list to read more carefully (perhaps for Scooping), finding my place in a printed text that I am listening to as an audiobook, etc.

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Helena Andrade Mendonça's curator insight, March 30, 12:29 PM

Sobre o Spritz, um aplicativo que propõe uma nova forma de leitura. Perturbador e instigante.

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Focus@will

Focus@will | Infotention | Scoop.it
focus@will combines neuroscience + music to boost productivity and tune out distractions!
Howard Rheingold's insight:

Apps like this are best approached with an open-minded skepticism. Open-minded because we're just beginning to see work on attention tools; skeptical because any mention of "neuroscience" raises the possibility of what has been called "neurobullocks" -- knowledge about the relationship between neural and attentional processes is very often nowhere near as precise as promoters would have us believe. Nevertheless, this is on my list to try out. I'll welcome feedback, both positive and negative, from anyone who tries this.

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David McGavock's curator insight, February 27, 4:56 PM

I concur with Howard Rheingold's advice that consumers be wary of claims to boost attention and productivity. At the same time ,improving attention is a very useful skill in these daze of distraction. We are just learning more about what works. Share your review of this and other such apps with Howard.

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The “channel blending” (vs. multitasking) phenomenon — and opportunities | PARC blog

The “channel blending” (vs. multitasking) phenomenon — and opportunities | PARC blog | Infotention | Scoop.it

"Through this study, PARC identified a phenomenon we call “channel blending”, which, in contrast to multi-tasking, is the blending together of interactions and content across multiple channels, devices, and places into a single, coherent conversation. We identified a gap in current communication technology, which generally supports one-to-one or many-to-many interactions, assuming that each person is alone in a space with a single device. Yet we found that many interactions were conducted among small groups of people of 2-6, who often connected with multiple people in each space using multiple devices, sometimes re-sharing content they previously shared over another channel. We showed videos that demonstrated channel blending, and pointed out how a “pivot person” usually had to do a lot of work to integrate the comments and content coming from multiple sources to make sure everyone was included and engaged in the conversation."

Howard Rheingold's insight:

Researchers at PARC, the place that brought us the personal computer as we know it, conduct research that further complicates the picture of multitasking. It isn't so simple as "multitasking is bad, focus is good," or "using mobile communication devices distances people who are face to face." Channel blending brings together these issues.

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IFTTT + Evernote = Automated Research - edSocialMedia

IFTTT + Evernote = Automated Research - edSocialMedia | Infotention | Scoop.it
The debate team at my school began using Evernote last year for collaborative research.  As students find sources, they dump them into … Continue reading »
Howard Rheingold's insight:

IFTTT to Evernote can be a powerful team infotention tool (Diigo groups is good for circumstances in which you want to attach comment threads to bookmarked material, add sticky notes, etc.)

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David McGavock's comment, February 6, 2:24 PM
Thanks Howard! looks like a great tool for my purposes
David McGavock's curator insight, February 6, 2:26 PM

Not a basic tool necessarily but a great tool if you want to link various social media engines. 

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Filters: Part 3: Thinking about routing

Filters: Part 3: Thinking about routing | Infotention | Scoop.it
Note: This is the third in a series of posts I’m committed to writing about filters; I started with the principles of filtering, and will proceed to blow up each of the principles in as much detail as makes sense at this stage.
Howard Rheingold's insight:

And more about filters from JP Rangaswami

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Filtering: Seven Principles

Filtering: Seven Principles | Infotention | Scoop.it

In earlier posts towards the tail end of last year and early this year, I committed to writing a number of posts on filtering. The background is simple:

  • soon, everything and everyone will be connected
  • that includes people, devices, creatures, inanimate objects, even concepts (like a tweet or a theme)
  • at the same time, the cost of sensors and actuators is dropping at least as fast as compute and storage
  • so that means everything and everyone can now publish status and alerts of pretty much anything
  • there’s the potential for a whole lotta publishing to happen
  • which in turn means it’s firehose time
  • so we need filters
  • which is why the stream/filter/drain approach is becoming more common
  • and which is why I want to spend time on all this during 2014, starting with the filter"
Howard Rheingold's insight:

Filtering is essential to the info-handling side of infotention, and JP Rangaswami is one of the few people I look to for deep and broad thinking about infotention issues (Harold Jarche and Robin Good are others who immediately come to mind). Consider adding his blog to your RSS aggregator: confused of calcutta: a blog about information

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, January 10, 3:06 PM

Filtering at the local level is a great idea, like real educational transformation happening at the local level. What are the likelihood either will happen? The serendipity point is so true in both technology and learning.

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My daily info-wrangling routine

My daily info-wrangling routine | Infotention | Scoop.it
Jane Hart describes her daily personal knowledge management (or PKM) routine.  It's an inspiring yet practical workflow for information curation.  Or information wrangling, as I like to call it: I ...
Howard Rheingold's insight:

Bryan Alexander takes off from Jane Hart's personal knowledge management routine to describe his own method of handling information overload, which he calls "information wrangling." He works through channels and sources daily, reflects, and shares. Alexander details each of these processes in his blog.

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Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, December 31, 2013 9:43 PM

This blog goes through how to manage the huge amounts of information coming in each moment through our digital channels. The author shares her personal knowledge management routine.

CIE San Diego's curator insight, January 1, 7:28 PM

Helpful way to structure what we each do more informally

Patricia Baker's curator insight, February 15, 6:33 PM

Could be a quick research tip for students: seek, sense, share.

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Information Overload, Past and Present | Dan Cohen

Information Overload, Past and Present | Dan Cohen | Infotention | Scoop.it

"Blair identifies four “S’s of text management” from the past that we still use today: storing,sortingselecting, and summarizing. She also notes the history of alternative solutions to information overload that are the equivalent of deleting one’s Twitter account: Descartes and other philosophers, for instance, simply deciding to forget the library so they could start anew. Other to-hell-with-it daydreams proliferated too:"

Howard Rheingold's insight:

I've scooped before about Ann Blair's book of pre-modern info-overload -- and what was done about (http://yalepress.yale.edu/book.asp?isbn=9780300112511). This is a nice short musing about today's information overload discourse.

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 24, 2013 2:00 PM

We need to know how to wisely use information or it becomes inert in the words of Alfred North Whitehead.

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5 Tips for Using Evernote on Your Smartphone

Digitize Post-It Notes, record audio, snap a photo of anything and easily share anything from Evernote on your smartphone.
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David McGavock's curator insight, December 22, 2013 2:28 PM

The benefit of Evernote is realized by it's availability on all of your communication devices. It's great to have help when you are operating on the smaller interface.

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Data Mining Reveals the Secret to Getting Good Answers - MIT Technology Review

Data Mining Reveals the Secret to Getting Good Answers - MIT Technology Review | Infotention | Scoop.it
Data Mining Reveals the Secret to Getting Good Answers
MIT Technology Review
According to Alexa, the site is the 3rd most popular Q&A site in the world and 79th most popular website overall.
Howard Rheingold's insight:

I can't imagine what coding was like before Stack Overflow. These days, problem-solving in coding involves knowing the right question to ask in order to find an answer. It's not just coding. Knowing how to get good answers to questions has become a primary infotention skill now that search engines are so much more intelligent and Q&A sites like Stack Overflow and Quora have become popular and useful.

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New Cognitive Training Study Takes on the Critics | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network

New Cognitive Training Study Takes on the Critics | Beautiful Minds, Scientific American Blog Network | Infotention | Scoop.it

"The most consistent and least controversial finding in the literature is that working memory training programs produce reliable short-term improvements in both verbal and visuospatial working memory skills. On average, the effect sizes range from moderate to large, although the long-term sustainability of these effects is much more ambiguous. These effects are called near transfer effects, because they don’t transfer very far beyond the trained domain of cognitive functioning.

What are far more controversial (and far more interesting) are far transfer effects. One particular class of far transfer effects that cognitive psychologists are particularly interested in are those that show increases in fluid intelligence: the deliberate but flexible control of attention to solve novel “on the spot” problems that cannot be perfomed by relying exclusively on previously learned habits, schemas, and scripts."

Howard Rheingold's insight:

A cornerstone of infotention is that attention and cognitive skills can be improved through training. Most research into this claim is recent, and as with all scientific research, there is some controversy. This article provides a good mary sof recent research that appears to support the efficacy of "brain training."

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, October 12, 2013 4:02 AM

This is an additional view of "fluid intelligence" along with Gardner's multiple intelligences.  Many theories that considers a "far transfer effects" are related to Krashen's Input Hypothesis, i+1 and Affective Filter Hypothesis. Dr. Krashen's theories are based in language acquistion but I consider them more in regards to learning and cognitive training.

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How the brain pays attention

How the brain pays attention | Infotention | Scoop.it

"Members of Desimone’s lab are now studying how the brain shifts its focus between different types of sensory input, such as vision and hearing. They are also investigating whether it might be possible to train people to better focus their attention by controlling the brain interactions  involved in this process.

“You have to identify the basic neural mechanisms and do basic research studies, which sometimes generate ideas for things that could be of practical benefit,” Desimone says. “It’s too early to say whether this training is even going to work at all, but it’s something that we’re actively pursuing.”


Read more at http://scienceblog.com/71642/how-the-brain-pays-attention/#6CSjmbufhdePSLK1.99

Howard Rheingold's insight:

Studies such as Nass et. al.'s "Cognitive Control in Media Multitaskers" have demonstrated on a general level that media multitaskers are actually rapidly task-switching and that the attentional costs of switching focus degrades efficiency in accomplishing individual tasks. But that research is just the beginning. Important to infotention is what is not yet known about how effective attentional training can be.

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Reading is different online than off, experts say

Reading is different online than off, experts say | Infotention | Scoop.it

"Our brains, neuroscientists warn, are developing new circuits with a big impact on non-digital reading."


“We can’t turn back,” [Doctor Maryanne] Wolf said. “We should be simultaneously reading to children from books, giving them print, helping them learn this slower mode, and at the same time steadily increasing their immersion into the technological, digital age. It’s both. We have to ask the question: What do we want to preserve?”

Wolf is training her own brain to be bi-literate. She went back to the Hesse novel the next night, giving herself distance, both in time and space, from her screens.

“I put everything aside. I said to myself, ‘I have to do this,’ ” she said. “It was really hard the second night. It was really hard the third night. It took me two weeks, but by the end of the second week I had pretty much recovered myself so I could enjoy and finish the book.”

Howard Rheingold's insight:

I am wary enough about "reading online is rewiring our brains" stories to check the research sources cited in the articles and see what their findings actua;ly say. This story about the way reading online makes it difficult to read longform texts that don't afford clicking away to another site in a few seconds caught my attention because it quotes Maryanne Wolf, author of Proust and the Squid. Wolf is a careful scientist who started studying reading disorders because her son had one. I like her call to teach and learn -- yes, reading hypertext all day does make it more difficult to read traditional longform non-interactive texts, but Wolf claims that not only can we teach our brains to be "bi-literate," but that we should incorporate bi-literacy into education. 

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Helena Andrade Mendonça's curator insight, April 9, 6:28 AM

Reflexão sobre leitura no impresso e no digital . Ainda não tinha ouvido 'Bi-literacy' 

Yolande Villemaire's curator insight, April 9, 5:55 PM

Slow reading versus online skimming. Training oneself to be bi-literate: digital reading and reading books. 

Julie Ekner Koch's curator insight, April 10, 3:45 AM

Are we becoming Twitter brains? We are losing the ability to read long texts if we don't preserve the analogue reading and writing. Our brain adapts to the digital way of skimming through texts, thereby losing the 'deep' comprehension created by offline reading

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Introducing Streamtools: A Graphical Tool for Working with Streams of Data

Introducing Streamtools: A Graphical Tool for Working with Streams of Data | Infotention | Scoop.it
By Mike Dewar


We see a moment coming when the collection of endless streams of data is commonplace. As this transition accelerates it is becoming increasingly apparent that our existing toolset for dealing with streams of data is lacking.

Via M. Edward (Ed) Borasky
Howard Rheingold's insight:

I haven't tried this yet, but it looks like it could be an effective advanced infotention tool for constructing custom radars and filters.

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Rick Frank's curator insight, March 13, 7:05 AM

Going to have to try this out.

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The beginner's guide to putting the internet to work for you: How to easily save 60 minutes every day - - The Buffer Blog

The beginner's guide to putting the internet to work for you: How to easily save 60 minutes every day - - The Buffer Blog | Infotention | Scoop.it
One of the most fun and useful things I’ve been doing lately is automating small processes I do all the time. It took me a while to work up the courage to dive into automation, as it always seemed like a really difficult, technical thing to do, which should be left to programmers. Luckily, there [...]
Howard Rheingold's insight:

Automating repetitive processes, including those you use to seek, filter, tag, store, and retrieve information, can be a useful infotention practice. I've Scooped IFTTT before. This blog post is by social media management service Buffer, so the examples are Buffer-centric, but any of these automation tools can be applied to a variety of platforms, services, and practices.

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Tara Verner's curator insight, February 23, 1:42 PM

Get some handy tips on how to automate every day tasks with online tools.

Paula Silva's comment, March 3, 11:39 PM
Will you check this scoop? Thank you so much. http://sco.lt/5okJ17
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The Technium: Multiplexing vs Multitasking

The Technium: Multiplexing vs Multitasking | Infotention | Scoop.it

"Starner replied that he multiplexes rather than multitasks. Multiplexing means doing tasks that reinforce each other. For him, taking notes and having conversations are tasks that parallel and enrich each other. They are multiplexed. On the other hand, he doesn't try to manage email during a conversation or while walking down the street. That would be multitasking. "If the wearable task is directly related to the conversation, the the user's attention is not 'split' and multiplexing can be pretty effective."

As Thad Starner explained to me, distraction can be avoided by multiplexing rather than multitasking.... We have no difficulty absorbing all at once the music of a parade, the sight of uniformed marchers, bright sunlight, an autumn breeze, a pain in one's knee, the smell and taste of hot dogs, and the clasp of a loved ones's hand."

Howard Rheingold's insight:

While Google Glass is what most of the world hears about wearable info-devices these days, Steve Mann and Thad Starner were experimenting with (much bulkier!) wearable devices at the Media Lab more than a decade ago. I interviewed Tharner back then. He had a head-mounted display and he also communicated wirelessly with his networks through a one-handed keyboard ("twiddler"), sometimes asking questions about conversations he was engaged in face to face. In this blog post, Kevin Kelly picks out a key passage from an interview with Starner in a book by Michael Chorost. While Cliff Nass' work pretty clearly showed that most (not all!) media multitaskers were degrading rather than enhancing their performance on their tasks, Nass, in conversation with me, noted that he had NOT studies instances in which the multitaskers were working with multiple relevant information streams. Starner calls this multiplexing. We need more research about whether everybody can learn to do this and  whether it enhances or degrades performance.

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Peter Skillen's curator insight, February 19, 8:05 AM

I love this distinction. NCTE's notion of ''managing multiple streams of information' makes sense when viewed as multiplexing. People have been interpreting this as multitasking - and this has been grossly incorrect in my opinion

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Hate the New Google Alerts? Here Are 6 Alternatives

Hate the New Google Alerts? Here Are 6 Alternatives | Infotention | Scoop.it
If you're not a fan of the new Google Alerts, there are several alternative tools you can use to monitor your business online.
Howard Rheingold's insight:

When I am researching or scanning a topic, I like to pull RSS feeds from Google alerts and other alert services -- I like Talkwalker. Knowing how to create and tune what Robin Good calls "news radars" is an essential infotention skill for people like me who track a lot of subjects and from time to time drill down on a subject more intensively.

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Filters: Part 2: Thinking about the network as filter

Filters: Part 2: Thinking about the network as filter | Infotention | Scoop.it
Note: This is a continuation of my earlier post Filtering: Seven Principles. Over the next few weeks I hope to expand on each of the principles, adjusting and refining as I learn from your comments, observations and guidance.
Howard Rheingold's insight:

More on filtering from JP Rangaswami. Its often useful to read his blog's comment stream -- he has an intelligent, knowledgeable, global personal learning network.

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Content Discovery Tools: a Directory of My Favorite Ones

Content Discovery Tools: a Directory of My Favorite Ones | Infotention | Scoop.it

Via Robin Good
Howard Rheingold's insight:

Robin Good is the curation maestro. Content discovery is the big end of the infotention funnel -- knowing how to find information relevant to your interests and to make use of channels that bring relevant information directly to you is step one in the infotention process.

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Volkmar Langer's curator insight, January 6, 5:54 AM

Wow, what a good structured Collection - thanks to Robin Good - his name is program :-)

Louise Robinson-Lay's curator insight, January 17, 1:30 AM

Finding material can be a challenge, after all, there is so much out there. Robin Good shares some of his go to content discovery tools here.

Nicoletta Gay's curator insight, January 29, 7:59 AM

Great resourcerces about Content Discovery collected by

@Robin Good

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A Personal Cyberinfrastructure (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu

A Personal Cyberinfrastructure (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu | Infotention | Scoop.it

"Students would frame, curate, share, and direct their own "engagement streams" throughout the learning environment.4 Like Doug Engelbart's bootstrappers in the Augmentation Research Center, these students would study the design and function of their digital environments, share their findings, and develop the tools for even richer and more effective metacognition, all within a medium that provides the most flexible and extensible environment for creativity and expression that human beings have ever built."

Howard Rheingold's insight:

Doug Engelbart's Augmentation Research Lab created the foundations of most of today's mind-amplifying tools in the 1960s, using a bootstrapping process that applied metacognition to the design process: They designed tools for thinking -- word processing,point and click computing interfaces, hypertext, for just three of many examples -- then studied their process of using them in order to design the next generation. In this short essay, Gardner Campbell compares the pedagogy of student self-publishing to the bootstrapping/metacognition process of the Augmentation Research Lab. I'm requiring my own students to set up and configure their own WordPress blogs on their own domains on servers in the cloud.

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CopyPaste Pro

CopyPaste Pro | Infotention | Scoop.it
CopyPaste is the original multiple clipboard display and editing software.
Howard Rheingold's insight:

I must use this a hundred times a day. It's the single most useful utility I have and I don't understand why it isn't part of the Mac OS. You can keep track of the last 200 items you've copied or cut to your clipboard and reuse them easily -- including multimedia. You can set up a hotkey combo to paste the top item in the stack, then delete it -- immensely useful for web work, blogging.

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Antonio Lopez's comment, December 20, 2013 10:09 AM
Thanks Howard. I always wondered shy Apple didn't have something like this already. This will be a life saver!
David McGavock's curator insight, December 22, 2013 1:34 PM

If you use copy - paste often (I certainly do), you know how often you'd like to paste an older item. Here ya go.

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Handout_WhatWillYouClickNext.docx

Handout_WhatWillYouClickNext.docx | Infotention | Scoop.it

"Howard Rheingold – the author of Net Smart: How to Thrive Online (2012) – recently argued that one of the most important skills to master in today’s world was the ability to focus your attention
while searching on the Web. He suggests that every learner should write down the three things that they want to get done BEFORE heading online. Then, they should make conscious choices
about what to click on while surfing, only selecting sites that are likely to help them move forward towards their final goal. Use this handout to help guide YOUR choices while working
online today.

Howard Rheingold's insight:

First the Mind/Shift: How We Learn blog published a post about some of my infotention ideas, then a teacher made this handy hand-out for students.

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David McGavock's curator insight, December 9, 2013 6:19 PM

Howard has been interrogating digital phenomena for decades. More good insights.

Ferananda's comment, December 11, 2013 2:48 PM
Howard, you are so awesome! thank you!
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The Complete Über-Geek's Guide to Reading Online

"Healthy online reading habits require constant gardening. Every Internet company provides us a little plot to tend for, and that’s how they keep our attention where they want it. But the soil is pretty gross in most of them, and the seeds are tightly regulated. If we want to read healthily, we have to build our own info gardens.

The most important gardening task is deciding what to plant — that is, what sources to read — and that’s a personal choice. The topics, tone, and perspective of your information sources are for you to determine. But the bulk of the work is in building and tending the garden, and this guide will suggest some tools and methods to help. And with the gardening work out of the way, you’ll spend most of your time cooking, eating, and sharing. That’s the delicious part, and this guide will offer my best recipes."

Howard Rheingold's insight:

Succinct, relevant, practical tips on online literacy skills from a skilled infotention practitioner.

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