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What you need to know about libraries, books, information science in Greece and the rest of the world
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The Evolving Role of University Libraries - Martha Bedard / UConn Advance (blog)

The Evolving Role of University Libraries - Martha Bedard / UConn Advance (blog) | Information Science | Scoop.it

By: Suzanne Zack:

Martha Bedard: "It is a really exciting time for libraries. In all the years I’ve worked in libraries it has never, ever been boring. I remember the first time I barcoded a book, well before everything we bought had a barcode, and I added records to the first online catalog which replaced the print card catalog. Librarians were active on the Internet pre-graphical interface, pre-web."


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, January 9, 2014 3:39 AM

The exciting future of academic libraries > abot the content and the spaces!

toraki's curator insight, January 9, 2014 9:30 AM

Ο ρόλος των ακαδημαϊκών βιβλιοθηκών σήμερα - και ένας ήσυχος χώρος για τους φοιτητές...

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The Library's Future Is Not an Open Book

The Library's Future Is Not an Open Book | Information Science | Scoop.it
A look at how America's central libraries are struggling to adapt their forms and functions to a rapidly changing world (RT @WSJ: The future of libraries isn't an open book.

 

By JULIE V. IOVINE:

"The relevance of these gloriously inflated book boxes is being questioned in an age that looks to the Internet for its intellectual resources."


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, May 15, 2013 8:15 AM

The changing library challenged by a constantly changing environement. The goal posts are moving the whole time!

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10 questions about books, libraries, librarians, and schools, by Scott McLeod

10 questions about books, libraries, librarians, and schools, by Scott McLeod | Information Science | Scoop.it

BY SCOTT MCLEOD:

"October apparently was ‘Library Month’ for me. I was the keynote speaker for the Minnesota MEMO conference and did a breakout session for the Iowa Library Association (ILA) conference. I also brought Dr. Mike Eisenberg to Iowa for three days to talk with school administrators about technology and information literacy. As a result, I’ve been reflecting a lot lately on books, reading, and the future of libraries and librarians…"

"Random questions

What constitutes a “book” these days? When books become electronic and thus become searchable, hyperlinkable, more accessible to readers with disabilities, and able to embed audio, video, and interactive maps and graphics, at what point do they stop becoming “books” and start becoming something else?"...


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The library's future in a digital world - Saugerties Public Library's director Sukrit Goswani

The library's future in a digital world - Saugerties Public Library's director Sukrit Goswani | Information Science | Scoop.it

by SHARYN FLANAGAN:

"Interview with library director Sukrit Goswami. The subject? The future of libraries in an increasingly digital world:

[...]

"What are people interested in and what programs are they signing up for?

Up to now we’ve been letting the community tell us what they want, just putting the programs out there in front of them and letting them choose. The most popular are the health-related programs, particularly the yoga and fitness classes, and also the educational programs; people love those. Our own staff teaches the computer programs, and in the coming year we want to offer resume building workshops and classes for job seekers on how to write cover letters. I’ve taught these when I was at Glens Falls [library], and I love teaching classes, but can’t now due to time constraints.

We are constantly expanding our services and programs, and we do three to four teen programs a week now, too, that are all well attended. We have increased storytime for children, adding one session to Saturdays for parents who work on weekdays, and that’s been very successful."

 

Full interview here:: http://www.saugertiesx.com/2012/08/16/librarys-future-digital-world/


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Exploring new roles for libraries and mediating technologies in addressing the DIY mindset of library patrons > Slideshare

Presentation given at the American Library Association Annual Conference, Anaheim, CA. June 23, 2012.

 

by Bohyun Kim on Jun 20, 2012

"Presentation given at the American Library Association Annual Conference, Anaheim, CA. June 23, 2012.

Speaker: Bohyun Kim, Digital Access Librarian, Florida International University
Speaker: Jason Clark, Head of Digital Access and Web Services, Montana State University Libraries
Speaker: Patrick T. Colegrove, Head, DeLaMare Science & Engineering Library, University of Nevada, Reno"

More program details: http://ala12.scheduler.ala.org/m/node/806


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The future of libraries: what the Guardian online debate found

The future of libraries: what the Guardian online debate found | Information Science | Scoop.it

By Ian Anstice:

"The Guardian held one of its online debates on libraries today. The discussion between several library experts (managers, campaigners, councillors) and anyone contributing online. Around 200 comments were made so it’s a little condfusing: I’ve endeavoured to summarise below, although doubtless I have missed some things which some would consider important. Main threads and arguments.

Are libraries declining due to technological change? Libraries are still needed, in some ways more than ever: internet/online access essential and libraries provide the access and skills to those without either or both. Seven million have never used the internet. Wikipedia etc don’t cover all information and are prone to deletion, accidental or otherwise and is also not entirely trustworthy anyway.  Libraries provide quiet study spaces.  Children need the books and everyone needs serendipity that bookshelves allow.  Bookstock is declining due to budget cuts.  It’s not black and white – books and e-books will co-exist. Books are still in demand with 244 million loans in England 2011/12,

Read more: http://www.publiclibrariesnews.com/2013/11/the-future-of-libraries-what-the-guardian-online-debate-found.html


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Karen du Toit's curator insight, November 29, 2013 7:40 AM

Main threads and arguments in the discussions! Interesting!

Alexina's curator insight, November 30, 2013 8:00 PM

This is a short summary of an extensive online discussion about public libraries in the UK, but much of the discussion applies to USA libraries too. I like libraries referred to as "Idea stores".

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Maker Librarian | Making the Future, One Library at a Time

Maker Librarian | Making the Future, One Library at a Time | Information Science | Scoop.it
RT @homeysimpson: new resource for librarians who want to learn about makers, hackerspaces, the participatory library and more: http://t.co/eQshWzOM

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Karen du Toit's comment, December 31, 2012 9:43 AM
Great resource for maker librarians!
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Phil Bradley's weblog: Libraries, books, ebooks and the future

Phil Bradley's weblog: Libraries, books, ebooks and the future | Information Science | Scoop.it
There's a text version and 2 videos totaling 24 minutes below. There’s a phrase that I use every now and then; “It’s like dancing on quick sand” and never was it more appropriate than right now in respect of the eBook arena.

 

"Let’s look at the latest news. A new low cost eBook reader has been unveiled by txtr, a German eBook retail platform...

 

Oyster, which is a new startup has raised $3 million in order to become the ‘Spotify of books’....

 

HarperCollins is launching a new global publishing system which will provide them with an infrastructure that allows them to maximise it’s catalogue of books, eBooks and apps...

 

The final news item that’s caught my eye, and I assume has also caught yours is that Amazon is going to launch their lending service in the UK by the end of the month..."

 

[...]

"We are at an absolutely pivotal point within both our profession, and within the library service in the UK. I recently talked to an ex-librarian who has since left the profession, and she said ‘I’m glad I got out, we’re finished’. That is so patently not the case it’s painful. This is a superb time to be a professional, or to have a love of libraries, of reading, books and knowledge. This is because we are going to be able to shape the development of all of those things into the future. What we do now is going to set a pattern for the next 50 or 100 years. We just need to believe in the power that the information professionals have, and the key role that libraries play in society. But – and this is a big but, we can only do it if we all work together, because it’s only by holding out our hands to one another in trust that we can help drag ourselves out of the quicksand, rather than push each other under faster."


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The Human Touch: Public Libraries in the 21st Century | The BookShed

The Human Touch: Public Libraries in the 21st Century | The BookShed | Information Science | Scoop.it

Submitted by Patricia J Delois:

RT @sallyheroes: "It appears that the number one thing patrons use the library for is (prepare yourself) books": http://t.co/CEiQTtdC via @JustinLibrarian...

 

"[...] surprised they would select books when they have so many other things to choose from. I imagine he’s even more surprised to learn that something else patrons rate highly is personal interaction with the staff. I don’t know who designed the survey, but it couldn’t have been the director. It wouldn’t have occurred to him to put “human interaction” on the list of things patrons might value. He’s all about technology.

No one disputes that technology has improved the library experience for the patron. You can search the catalog from home and access our subscribed databases. You can place your own holds, request your own interlibrary loan materials, download books to your own devices.

The library is working towards self-checkout, presumably so you can conduct all your library business without ever having to interact with the staff. This must sound like a dream-come-true for the director, who hates to interact with the library staff, but for patrons, there’s more to the library than just the delivery of materials. They like human contact."


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