InformationCommunication (ICT)
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Computers & Education.

Dan Kirsch's insight:
The research interest here begs the question is there still a need for a full-time a computer teacher in the K-12 education or not? Essentially, with integrated technology within K-12 classrooms is need for a computer teacher obsolete? Should schools hire technology integrationists in the future? We are of the perspective that there is STILL a need for a computer teacher as well as an integrationist.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, August 6, 2014 8:48 PM
It might not be an either/or situation i.e. computer teacher or integrating teaching computer use in classrooms. It might be working in ways that allow both to exist and complement. @ivon_ehd1
InformationCommunication (ICT)
Communicating effectively utilizing technological resources and information. This topic also contains information within the realms of Social Media and Content Curation in & out of the classroom.
Curated by Dan Kirsch
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Facebook Topics to Watch – ‘Digital Video’ Seeing Big, Sustained Growth #Infographic

Facebook Topics to Watch – ‘Digital Video’ Seeing Big, Sustained Growth #Infographic | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Facebook has released the third of its now monthly ‘Topics to Watch’ reports, highlighting the subjects gaining the most traction in terms of conversation volume across The Social Network.

But more than merely the number of mentions of each, Facebook’s data team is tracking topics with the most significant growth potential, the subjects most likely to become ‘the next big thing’

Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com, massimo facchinetti, steve batchelder, Stephania Savva
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15 Super Quick Ways to Share Files Without Cloud Storage by Joel Lee

15 Super Quick Ways to Share Files Without Cloud Storage by Joel Lee | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
by Joel Lee

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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listlessbuttock's comment, June 3, 12:06 AM
This is so great!
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The Maker Movement in K-12 Education: A Guide to Emerging Research

The Maker Movement in K-12 Education: A Guide to Emerging Research | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
As Maker Education evolves in K-12, researchers are exploring related equity issues, design principles for Maker spaces, and the impact of this approach on student learning.
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6 Ways to Use Advanced Twitter Search for Increased Influence : Social Media Examiner

6 Ways to Use Advanced Twitter Search for Increased Influence : Social Media Examiner | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Do you want to be a recognized expert in your industry? Looking for relevant conversations to weigh in on? Using Twitter’s Advanced Search to monitor keywords and conversations can help you connect with influencers and uncover opportunities for thought leadership. In this article you’ll discover six ways to use Twitter’s Advanced Search to increase your influence in your industry. #1: Find Conversations to Participate In Doing a keyword search on Twitter is a quick and easy way to find out what people in your industry are talking about, identify accounts to follow, and discover new business opportunities. With Twitter’s Advanced Search, you can create complex searches with keywords that are relevant to your industry. To start, choose three or four keywords that are relevant to your industry and use the Boolean search operator “OR” to create a single search for all of your terms. For example, search for “digital marketing” OR “digital marketing advice.” Look at the search results to find conversations in your niche. Then join relevant discussions to offer expert advice and build meaningful connections with people in your industry. Use the OR operator to ensure that every key phrase or search term is relevant to your mission. Keep this list updated and weed out the keywords that aren’t helping you find the best results. Soon you’ll have a filtered list of conversations to review on a daily basis. You can also add keywords like “recommend” to find prospects looking for services you offer. You can also use a keyword search to optimize your own Twitter profile. Add keywords to your bio to help other users find you. Including key phrases (such as “public speaker” and “charity worker”) may help you uncover new opportunities. #2: Monitor Hashtags for Media Opportunities You can follow specific hashtags and keywords to discover people who are looking for thoughtful comments or quotes. For example, the hashtag #journorequest is popular among journalists and industry writers. You can create an advanced search that pairs both #journorequest and your key industry terms (“skincare expert” or “facial expert,” for example) to find opportunities for free coverage in print and online. Once you’ve uncovered opportunities through hashtag monitoring, reach out to users to share your expert insights. This helps you get media coverage for your business and create meaningful connections. #3: Connect and Converse With Industry Peers Your influence is often measured by the network you keep. Use Twitter’s Advanced Search filters to find key contacts and people to follow in your industry. Filter Results by Account In Twitter’s search box, search for a keyword (or group of keywords). Then to filter your results, click More Options and select Accounts to see only those accounts that contain your keywords. Once you create a tailored list of key industry contacts, follow those users, add them to a list, or use a monitoring tool like TweetDeck to track what they’re saying. Filter Results by People You Follow You can also limit your search to only the users you follow. To do this, enter your search term (for example, “social media data”). Then filter your results by clicking More Options and selecting From People I Follow. Your search results will only include tweets that match your search query and are from the accounts you follow. Filter Results by Date You can add a date range to find conversations relevant to your topics of interest and occurring within the last few weeks from users you follow. This gives you the opportunity to add comments, share your insights, and show thought leadership within your online peer group. Filter Results by People You can also use Twitter search to find previous conversations you’ve had with your contacts. This is a great way to revive relationships and build camaraderie. To recap previous conversations, use the From These Accounts and To These Accounts filters within Twitter’s Advanced Search panel. #4: Comment on News in Real Time Use Twitter’s keyword search function to stay on top of real-time trends and news. For example, create a keyword search for “Facebook” and “breaking” and “news,” so you’ll know immediately about updates to Facebook. Also think about how users write about news and then do a search for those phrases. For example, for breaking news, people may use phrases like “just happened,” “can’t believe it,” “just witnessed,” etc., rather than more obvious search terms like “news” or “latest story.” Once you uncover relevant news, contribute personal insights and quotes and share articles to position yourself as someone worth listening to. If you have the resources (and time), create blog posts, memes, or images about the topic to leverage more coverage and social shares from the update. #5: Research Customer Interests and Needs Understanding your customers’ interests and needs is important for building an engaged audience. This is where the user search operators come in handy. There are three main operators to know about. Search for Tweets From a Specific User Sometimes you’ll want to follow tweets from a specific user. Perhaps you want to learn more about a customer or have found an excellent blog that consistently tweets useful content. To track down their tweets, search for “from:[user].” For example, search for “from:apttherapy” to see only tweets from Apartment Therapy. You can use a combination of these searches to create your own curated feed of Twitter content. For example, the search “twitter from:thenextweb OR from:buffer OR from:smexaminer” would generate a great list of content. Search for Tweets to a Specific User Similarly, you can use the “to” operator to find tweets sent to a specific user. For example, if there are competitor tools or services that are similar to your own, you could search “to:[user]” to find out what people are tweeting to that account. This is a great way to learn more about your customers and find out their needs. You can then provide answers through your own content or tweets. This search also helps you uncover tweets you may not have otherwise seen. For example, when people tweet directly to another user, the tweets are hidden within Tweets and Replies and are not always viewable within the timeline. Search for Tweets About a Specific User To find tweets about a specific user, search with the user’s full Twitter handle. For example “@zappos” will show you a long list of tweets that mention the company’s Twitter account. This is a great way to build your knowledge within a specific area, find new customers, and contribute to thought leadership within your industry. #6: Fine-Tune Your Searches To find tweets that are worth sharing or contributing to, you need to use the right combination of keywords and filters to fine-tune your results. Here are a few of the ways you can use Twitter’s Advanced Search to cut out the noise. Exclude Retweets When you’re looking for great articles to share, you want to share the direct source or a clean tweet, rather than a retweeted share from another user. To ignore retweets in your Twitter searches, simply add “-RT” to your search. For example, if Buffer Blog has a new post on social media that would be interesting to share, you can search for @Buffer “social media” -RT. This search won’t exclude all shares of the article, but will ensure you don’t retweet another retweet. It allows you to connect directly with the original sharer and a cleaner post. Filter Tweets With Links One way to develop thought leadership is to engage with other users and talk to them as you would in everyday life. To filter your feed to show only tweets that contain thoughts or comments, exclude tweets containing links. To do this, enter the prefix “http” into the None of These Words field or simply add “-http” into your search box. Then dig into the rich conversations and thought pieces you’ve discovered. See Only the Most Popular Posts To become a thought leader, it’s important to curate high-quality posts that are already popular with users. To find this content, use the minimum retweets advanced search. Search for “from:[account] min_retweets:10” in the Twitter search box or Advanced Search panel. For example, a search for “from:thenextweb min_retweets:300” reveals tweets that received more than 300 retweets, which is serious traction. You can also reverse the exclude function to include specific results. For example, if you want to find blog posts or web pages to share, include “http” in your search along with a keyword such as “marketing” or “fashion trends.” In Conclusion Many people turn to Twitter when looking for thought leaders, recommendations, and insightful comments within their industry. By becoming a master of Twitter Advanced Search, you can hunt down leads, uncover new opportunities, and position yourself as a thought leader. What do you think? How do you use Twitter to establish yourself as a thought leader? Please share your thoughts and experiences in the comments!
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How to Create More Exposure Using LinkedIn : Social Media Examiner

How to Create More Exposure Using LinkedIn : Social Media Examiner | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
LinkedIn Publisher Best Practices Keep your content between 400 and 600 words long. Many people use LinkedIn at work and don’t have the time to read long, in-depth articles. Include visual content and embed video content when applicable. In a recent study, 86% of buyers expressed some level of desire to access interactive/visual content on demand. Mention other industry leaders or professionals in your network. This increases your chances of earning more social shares, building recognition through third-party validation and enticing your readers to engage with your content.
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3 Things Every Social Marketer Needs to Know in 2016

3 Things Every Social Marketer Needs to Know in 2016 | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Read the article: 3 Things Every Social Marketer Needs to Know in 2016 | Written by social media specialists from Socialbakers.
Via Rami Kantari
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4 Steps to Boost Your Social Media Engagement

4 Steps to Boost Your Social Media Engagement | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Social media engagement demands a symbiotic relationship between brands and fans. Here are four tips for strengthening those relationships.
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4 Steps for Creating a Social Media Calendar | Sprout Social

4 Steps for Creating a Social Media Calendar | Sprout Social | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Planning out your social media efforts can make or break the engagement you see. Here are four steps for creating a social media calendar.
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A 6-Step Guide To Tracking Social Media In Google Analytics

A 6-Step Guide To Tracking Social Media In Google Analytics | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Track and measure social media initiatives with Google Analytics to prove the ROI of social media for business.
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Facebook Pages Can Reply to Comments Privately: This Week in Social Media : Social Media Examiner

Facebook Pages Can Reply to Comments Privately: This Week in Social Media : Social Media Examiner | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Social media news and developments making social media marketing easier. (Facebook Private Page Replies, Facebook News Feed Update, 60-Second Instagram Ads)
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A Beautiful Poster Featuring Basic Digital Skills Every Teacher Should Have ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

A Beautiful Poster Featuring Basic Digital Skills Every Teacher Should Have ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it

Via Inge Wassmann, Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Suvi Salo
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Inge Wassmann's curator insight, February 5, 9:24 AM

Pictograph with great resources! In order to access the resources mentioned directly go to the link above the pictograph.

Joyce Valenza's curator insight, February 6, 7:53 AM

A checklist for us and our classroom teacher partners

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Top 25 Social Media Blogs to Follow Right Now

Top 25 Social Media Blogs to Follow Right Now | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Tired of reading the same old social media blogs? We've got you covered. Here's 25 blogs to follow if you want to instantly spice up your daily reading!
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8 Logical Factors Make Computer Run Slow – Speed up Computer Now

8 Logical Factors Make Computer Run Slow – Speed up Computer Now | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Why does our computer runs slow? How can we speed up a slow computer? You can find correct answers from this post.

Via Skylly_W, Rami Kantari
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Skylly_W's comment, June 24, 5:03 AM
Thank you very much
Skylly_W's comment, June 24, 5:03 AM
Thank you very much
Skylly_W's comment, June 27, 2:39 AM
Thank you very much
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A Guidebook for Social Media in the Classroom | Edutopia

A Guidebook for Social Media in the Classroom | Edutopia | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Comments:
A fresh look a social media and how it should be taught in the classroom. - jdecker14
Tags: social, media, classroom, tech
by: jdecker14
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How to Advertise on LinkedIn : Social Media Examiner

How to Advertise on LinkedIn : Social Media Examiner | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Are you looking for more leads from LinkedIn? Want to use LinkedIn ads to help? LinkedIn’s advertising platform lets you reach highly targeted groups of professionals with your customer acquisition message. In this article you’ll discover how to use LinkedIn ads to reach the most relevant professional audiences for your business. #1: Choose an Ad Format Using the self-service LinkedIn Ads platform, you can create two types of ads: sponsored updates and text ads. Both of these allow you to send visitors to your website. The differences between the two are where they are displayed and how you create them. Below you can see one sponsored update in the LinkedIn news feed in the red box and three text ads in the blue box. In terms of actions, people who see the sponsored update can click through to the advertiser’s website using the link and the image in the update, click through to the advertiser’s LinkedIn company page or showcase page or follow the advertiser’s LinkedIn company or showcase page. For text ads, people can only click through to the advertiser’s website using the link and the image in the ad. Because the cost of LinkedIn ads tends to run higher than other social platforms like Facebook and Twitter, you’ll want to monitor your analytics vigilantly. If you use UTM parameters with your URLs and Google Analytics with either ad format, you’ll ensure that you’re getting conversions for your ad budget. Now, let’s look at how you can create these types of ads on LinkedIn. #2: Create a Sponsored Update To create a sponsored update, visit the LinkedIn Campaign Manager. You’ll need an account linked to your LinkedIn company page or showcase page to create a sponsored update. If you already have one, you can click on your account from the list. If you don’t see an account in your Campaign Manager, you’ll need to click the Add Account button to create one. After you select your account, click on the Create Campaign button. Then select Sponsored Updates. Next, enter a name for your campaign. Then either choose an update to sponsor from your company page or showcase page, or click the link to Create New Sponsored Content. If you choose to sponsor an update that has already been posted to your company or showcase page, you won’t have the option to edit it. If you choose to create new sponsored content instead, you can customize an update that will be seen only by your target audience. You can create one or more new updates to use as variations for your sponsored update campaign. This allows you to see whether you get better results from link posts, photo posts, posts with certain text or posts with certain images. These updates also appear on a special tab for Direct Sponsored Content on your company page or showcase page. Any content on this tab is shown only to you and your target ad audiences. You can use the Direct Sponsored Content tab to monitor engagement with the posts in terms of likes and comments. After you configure your target audience and budget (which I’ll show you after we look at the text ad configuration), you’ll launch your campaign. If you chose multiple variations, you can view them to see which ones perform best once your campaign goes live. Ultimately you can toggle the underperforming ones off. #3: Create a Text Ad To create a text ad, visit the LinkedIn Campaign Manager. You can do so under a personal account not linked to a company page or showcase page, or you can choose to add an account linked to your company page or showcase page. Once you select your account, click on the Create Campaign button. Then select Text Ads. Next, enter a name for your campaign and then start configuring your text ad. You can choose to direct visitors to your page on LinkedIn or to a URL on your website. Then add an image, a 25-character headline and a 75-character description. You can see a preview of your text ad on the right side of the page. Once you save your first text ad, you have the option to create up to 14 additional versions (totaling 15 text ads) to use for testing purposes. This allows you to see whether you get better results from different images, headlines or descriptions. After you configure your target audience and budget (which I’ll show you in the following sections), you can launch your campaign. As with sponsored updates, if you chose multiple variations, you can determine which ones perform best and ultimately toggle the underperforming ones off. #4: Target Relevant Audiences Audience targeting options for both sponsored updates and text ads are the same. Once you’ve configured your sponsored updates or text ads, you’ll see the following audience targeting options. To get started, select the locations you want to include or exclude. Then you have the option to target your audience with a variety of professional traits: company name, company industry, company size, job title, job function, job seniority, school, fields of study, degrees, skills, LinkedIn group membership, gender and age. As you select certain criteria, you’ll see your estimated target audience size change in the right sidebar. You may also notice that you won’t be able to select related criteria. For example, if you select Company Name, you won’t be able to select Company Industry or Company Size. Likewise, if you select Job Title, you won’t be able to select Job Function or Job Seniority. At the bottom, you also have the option to include similar audiences through Audience Expansion (audiences similar to those you’ve targeted) and reach audiences beyond the LinkedIn news feed (audiences of LinkedIn partners). If you prefer to reach only the people you’ve specified in your targeting or people in the LinkedIn news feed, you can uncheck both of these boxes. If you leave them checked, your ad budget will likely be completed faster. #5: Set Your Ad Budget Once you’ve configured your target audience, you’ll set your ad campaign’s budget. You can choose between cost per click (CPC) and cost per impression (CPM) based on whether you want to pay for results or exposure. From this screen, you can also configure your suggested bid, daily budget, total budget and when to run your campaign. #6: Review Your Analytics To review your ad campaign’s analytics, visit your LinkedIn Campaign Manager and click on the campaigns you want to review. From the view below, you can see a quick comparison of ad performance between sponsored update and text ad campaigns. You can also use the links to see data specific to social actions and budget. When you click through to each campaign, you’ll be able to see the performance of different variations of ads within each campaign. You can edit your ads, audience targeting and budget if needed, as well as review your analytics. Be sure to monitor these often and toggle the campaigns and ad variations on and off according to performance. In Conclusion If you’re looking to target a strictly professional audience, LinkedIn Ads is definitely a platform to try. What do you think? Do you use LinkedIn Ads? If so, please share your experiences and results in the comments!
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Facebook Live: Why Live Video Matters for Marketers : Social Media Examiner

Facebook Live: Why Live Video Matters for Marketers : Social Media Examiner | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Help Us Spread the Word! Please let your Twitter followers know about this podcast. Simply click here now to post a tweet. If you enjoyed this episode of the Social Media Marketing podcast, please head over to iTunes, leave a rating, write a review and subscribe. And if you listen on Stitcher, please click here to rate and review this show.
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How to Get Started on the Most Popular Social Media Networks : Social Media Examiner

How to Get Started on the Most Popular Social Media Networks : Social Media Examiner | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Are you starting a new social media presence? Do you know what to share on each platform? In this article, you’ll discover tips to guide your posting on six social media networks. #1: Start a Conversation on Facebook People typically use Facebook to catch up on news and chat with friends. If you want to connect with your audience, you can’t just copy a headline and call it a day. Instead, ask a question or tease what makes your post interesting. Picture someone sharing the post with their friends. Encourage that with your tone. Your posts will get more engagement on Facebook if you include an image. Share a link and choose a bold image to catch the attention of your fans. You can upload a photo or video directly to the platform. Facebook’s algorithm favors native videos uploaded directly. Keep your photos in the 1200 x 630 pixel range. Remember, if you want to boost the post or use it as an ad, the image must include less than 20% text. Facebook users are most active in the afternoon. A general rule is when people are bored at work, they’re probably browsing Facebook. One study found that Facebook posts at 3 pm receive the most clicks. Thursday and Friday tend to be the busiest days. Keep an eye on your Facebook analytics to see which posts get the most engagement and adjust your posting schedule accordingly. #2: Inspire and Educate on Pinterest People come to Pinterest on a mission. They want to learn a new skill, buy a new product, or find a new project. For these reasons, valuable and informative posts get the most engagement. Pinterest favors information-rich captions, which can be up to 500 characters long. Tell your audience what inspired you about the pin, give an overview of what they’ll find if they click through, and include a call to action like “Click for more” or “Comment with your thoughts.” Resize your photos to fit the vertical pin standard. The recommended size is 600 x 1200 pixels. To add more interest, you may want to combine a few photos or add a text overlay. Pinners are more active in the evening and especially on Saturday. Schedule your pins in the evening and make sure you spread them out. If you upload a group of pins at the same time, you’ll likely miss out on some engagement. #3: Join the Conversation on Twitter People typically go to Twitter to have a conversation or follow news at a specific moment in time. It’s a great place for you to share product updates and news or answer questions from your users or community. Your space and time are limited on Twitter, of course. You have 140 characters to share your take on your link or ask a question. Add one or two relevant hashtags to connect your post to a conversation or community. If you add photos or other images to your tweet, you can boost your retweets by as much as 150%. Horizontal images perform best on Twitter. Keep your images around 440 x 220 pixels. Twitter generally sees the most activity between 1 and 3 pm on weekdays. But because a tweet’s half-life is just a few hours, it’s good practice to share your content more than once, perhaps in prime time and in the evening or early morning. #4: Keep It Professional on LinkedIn LinkedIn is the professional social network, so people come to the platform with a work mindset. Joining the conversation on LinkedIn is like making a presentation in your office or at an industry conference. Share your industry updates or thoughts on strategy as you would speak to peers or potential clients. This is the place to use the industry lingo you often avoid on other social networks. Like other social networks, visuals will help boost engagement with your content. Horizontal images typically work best. In terms of size, keep your images around 646 x 220 pixels. People spend the most time on LinkedIn mid-week. Post early in the morning or late in the afternoon on Tuesday or Wednesday for best results. Users don’t check in on LinkedIn as often as other networks, so you don’t need to share new information every day. Find a schedule that you can keep up with, even if you post just once a week. #5: Join the Party on Tumblr Tumblr is a great place to engage a younger audience because the majority of users are younger than age 35. The network is a casual environment where people are looking for entertainment. Don’t be afraid to share your amusement in your words. St. Ives often entertains their Tumblr audience with bright GIFs with Tumblr tags. Tumblr is a visual network, and GIFs and memes are especially popular. Don’t be afraid to turn old visuals into a GIF or meme. Keep your images about 500 x 750 pixels. Before you post, research your topic to learn what words and hashtags people use most often with that topic. Add your hashtags to the bottom of the caption to tag your image and improve discoverability. Tumblr users are most active late in the evening. Schedule your posts after 10 pm to reach more people. #6: Share Perspective on Instagram Instagram users scroll through the feed on their phone in search of inspiration, entertainment, and beauty. Increasingly, people share experiences and explore places. To enhance a visual you’ve used on another social network, turn it into a simple graphic or add a behind-the-scenes photo of how it was made. Although Instagram is about visuals first, captions are also important. Tell a story with your post, share a quote related to the image, or give a teaser to preview content connected to that photo. The caption is a great place to include a call to action. For example, use the caption to direct your audience to the link in your profile. In 2015, Instagram moved beyond the square format and started allowing vertical and horizontal images, giving users many more options. If you want to grow an Instagram following (helping you drive more traffic and engagement in the long run), I recommend choosing a standard format and sticking with it. Then attach a logo or branding element to your image to make sure you benefit from any regramming. Instagrammers are most active in the evenings after 8 pm and early mornings. Monday and Thursday tend to be active days. Try scheduling your posts for those days and see if you get more engagement. Conclusion Imagine walking into three different environments: your office, the local mall, and happy hour with your friends. What would the conversations be like, what would you wear, and what would your mindset be? Chances are each situation would be unique. Similarly, the conversation, style, and mindset you use for each social platform should be different. What do you think? How does your approach differ for each social platform? Please share your thoughts in the comments below.
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Connectivism in Learning Activity Design: Implications for Pedagogically-Based Technology Adoption in African Higher Education Contexts 

Connectivism in Learning Activity Design: Implications for Pedagogically-Based Technology Adoption in African Higher Education Contexts  | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it

"This paper examines the possible characteristics and the value of designing learning activities grounded in connectivism—an emerging learning theory. It is an exploratory attempt to connect the theory to the prevailing technology adoption archetypes used in African contexts with the aim of extracting influences that could shape pedagogical technology adoption in African higher education contexts. A reflection on the process of designing learning activities that employ blogging in an experimental training intervention provides a unique context in which to try and infuse connectivist principles while outlining the challenges that surface."


Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Sabrina M. Budel, juandoming, Stephania Savva
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37 Visual Content Marketing Statistics You Should Know in 2016

37 Visual Content Marketing Statistics You Should Know in 2016 | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
What does the visual content landscape look like for 2016? Here are 37 statistics that will give you a sneak peek.
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The Psychology of Social Media

The Psychology of Social Media | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
The psychology of social media: Why people post, share, and build relationships, and how to create an irresistible social media experience for your audience
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16 Tools Every Social Media Manager Should Use | Visually Blog

16 Tools Every Social Media Manager Should Use | Visually Blog | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
15 Tools Every Social Media Manager Should Use https://t.co/LTFFjRwtXl
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How to Use Facebook Messenger for Your Business : Social Media Examiner

How to Use Facebook Messenger for Your Business : Social Media Examiner | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Looking for a new way to connect with customers and prospects on Facebook? Messenger for business pages makes it easy to offer instant customer service.
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9 Best Social Media and Content Marketing Tips From Buffer

9 Best Social Media and Content Marketing Tips From Buffer | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
We've experimented with lots of different content marketing methods at Buffer, so I wanted to share with you 9 of the best ways we've found to increase engageme
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Content Curation: Things to Consider to Nail a Winning Strategy

Content Curation: Things to Consider to Nail a Winning Strategy | InformationCommunication (ICT) | Scoop.it
Content curation is not just for people in marketing. The folks of this field know to create a hub of information regardless of the type of your niche. Since it is a fairly broad topic, you need to p…
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