Information Technology [I.T]
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Mobile Gaming in Emerging Markets: Five-Year Forecast and Impact Analysis

Mobile gaming is enjoying solid growth. The number of gamers increased from about 55m in 2005 to about 183m in 2008, and global revenue in 2008 came to $6.9b...

Via Chris Thomson
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Chris Thomson's curator insight, March 21, 2013 11:47 PM

The video provides a very visual explanation of the growth of the game industry, more specifically the mobile gaming industry. The video is put together by Pyramid Research, an organisation that specialises in forecasting the communications, media and technology industries.  

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The Future of Television-HPA Tech Retreat Unites Techy Types

The Future of Television-HPA Tech Retreat Unites Techy Types | Information Technology [I.T] | Scoop.it

 

A who’s who of the country’s broadcast, film and TV post production industry convened in Indian Wells, California to listen to tech presentations on everything from Ultra HDTV to Mobile DTV and chew over the latest conundrums.

 


Via Andre Bontems
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Network technology, disruptive innovation and the future

This is the presentation I gave to the SAFFIRE launch festival at the University of Canberra on Monday 18 March, 2013

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Will Stewart's curator insight, March 21, 2013 6:48 AM

In terms of most HE institutions, DI would really only enable them catch up with 30 years of using technology to do what they have always done, and resisting any significant changes.

Peter B. Sloep's curator insight, March 28, 2013 8:04 AM

The 'I' in the above is Mark Smithers. Although you really miss the voice that goes with the slides, the slides themselves already provide a lot of food for thought. There's one comment I would like to add to what Anne already said.

I am starting the feel uneasy about the term 'disruptive innovation'. As a descriptive term of past events it probably makes good sense, but as a label for current events, such as the mushrooming of MOOCs, it almost takes on a prescriptive guise. Its use almost implies that universities should stop thinking about their future, there is no point doing so as there is none.  MOOCs being a disruptive innovation are bound to take over from them. To be sure, Mark doesn't say so, indeed, he discusses reactions universities should have. However, pictures like the one of a huge, grounded ship easily evoke an image of inability timely to change course. Before you know it, such descriptions become self-fulilling prophecies (something which of course some people are only too keen to emphasise, as is evidenced by another one of this week's scoops of mine: http://sco.lt/89vrjF) (@pbsloep)

Patricia Daniels's curator insight, March 28, 2013 11:24 AM

H817 students. A lot of points made that are relevant to what we are doing at the moment. I share the same sentiments as Anne Whaits and feel that we'll be seeing more diversity in the future, or as Smither's terms it 'Multiversity'.

 

I heard an interesting comment from one of my advanced English language students today in response to the topic, 'Young people have too many opportunities nowadays'. Her reply was, 'No that's not true, we have choices. We have more choices now that suit different learners. I think it's great.'

 

Perhaps we need to listen more intensely to the student voice?

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Epic Win - Why Gaming is the Future of Learning

Why doesn't the real world seem more like an online game? In the best-designed games, our human experience is perfectly optimized: we have important work to do,

Via Rui Guimarães Lima, Genevieve Free
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7 Pieces Of Wearable Tech Being Developed Right Now - Edudemic

7 Pieces Of Wearable Tech Being Developed Right Now - Edudemic | Information Technology [I.T] | Scoop.it
Much like 3D printing, wearable tech are much less mainstream than tablets in the classroom, so they've gotten a bit less face time with our lovely audience
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Semantic Web Technology and the Future of Learning - Online Universities.com

Semantic Web Technology and the Future of Learning - Online Universities.com | Information Technology [I.T] | Scoop.it
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How 3D printing will change the world

How 3D printing will change the world | Information Technology [I.T] | Scoop.it
To anyone who hasn’t seen it demonstrated, 3D printing sounds futuristic – like the meals that materialised in the Jetsons’ oven at the touch of a keypad.
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Why iWatch And Google Glass Could Make Smartphones Dumb - Forbes

Why iWatch And Google Glass Could Make Smartphones Dumb - Forbes | Information Technology [I.T] | Scoop.it
The rectangular slabs in our pockets could eventually be relegated to 'dumb screens,' if we get all our notifications and connectivity from wearable devices.
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Future Computers Quantum Computing Nanotechnology Artificial Intelligence | Future Technology 500

Future Computers Quantum Computing Nanotechnology Artificial Intelligence | Future Technology 500 | Information Technology [I.T] | Scoop.it
Future computers are discussed including the role of quantum computing, nanotechnology, artificial intelligence and the social impact this will have a few years from now.
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Brain Researchers Can Detect Who We Are Thinking About

Brain Researchers Can Detect Who We Are Thinking About | Information Technology [I.T] | Scoop.it

Scientists scanning the human brain can now tell whom a person is thinking of, the first time researchers have been able to identify what people are imagining from imaging technologies.

Work to visualize thought is starting to pile up successes. Recently, scientists have used brain scans to decode imagery directly from the brain, such as what number people have just seen and what memory a person is recalling. They can now even reconstruct videos of what a person has watched based on their brain activity alone. Cornell University cognitive neuroscientist Nathan Spreng and his colleagues wanted to carry this research one step further by seeing if they could deduce the mental pictures of people that subjects conjure up in their heads.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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luiy's curator insight, March 16, 2013 7:32 AM

Imagining others


His team first gave 19 volunteers descriptions of four imaginary people they were told were real. Each of these characters had different personalities. Half the personalities were agreeable, described as liking to cooperate with others; the other half were less agreeable, depicted as cold and aloof or having similar traits. In addition, half these characters were described as outgoing and sociable extroverts, while the others were less so, depicted as sometimes shy and inhibited. The scientists matched the genders of these characters to each volunteer and gave them popular names like Mike, Chris, Dave or Nick, or Ashley, Sarah, Nicole or Jenny.

The researchers then scanned volunteers’ brains using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which measures brain activity by detecting changes in blood flow. During the scans, the investigators asked participants to predict how each of the four fictitious people might behave in a variety of scenarios — for instance, if they were at a bar and someone else spilled a drink, or if they saw a homeless veteran asking for change.

“Humans are social creatures, and the social world is a complex place,” Spreng says. “A key aspect to navigating the social world is how we represent others.”

 

The scientists discovered that each of the four personalities were linked to unique patterns of brain activity in a part of the organ known as the medial prefrontal cortex. In other words, researchers could tell whom their volunteers were thinking about.

 

“This is the first study to show that we can decode what people are imagining,” Spreng says.

 

Unlocking brain’s personality models
The medial prefrontal cortex helps people deduce traits about others. These findings suggest this region is also where personality models are encoded, assembled and updated, helping people understand and predict the likely behavior of others and prepare for the future.

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Neuristors and the future of brain-like computing

Neuristors and the future of brain-like computing | Information Technology [I.T] | Scoop.it

Via Gerd Moe-Behrens
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Gerd Moe-Behrens's curator insight, March 17, 2013 3:37 PM

by
John Hewitt

"Hewitt Crane was a practical minded kind of guy. To help the world get a better feel for just how much oil it used in a year, he came up with the unit he called the cubic mile of oil (CMO) to considerable acclaim. Crane was actually one of the pioneers of computing. He was an early developer of magnetic core RAM, eye-tracking devices, pen input devices, and invented the first all-magnetic computers still finding extensive use for fail-safe systems in the military. Today, another kind of device he presciently envisioned back in 1960 is starting to attract attention – the neuristor.

A neuristor is the simplest possible device that can capture the essential property of a neuron – that is, the ability to generate a spike or impulse of activity when some threshold is exceeded. A neuristor can be thought of as a slightly leaky balloon that receives inputs in the form of puffs of air. When its limit is reached, it pops. The only major difference is that more complex neuristors can repeat the process again and again, as long as spikes occur no faster than a certain recharge period known as the refractory period.  Read more: http://www.itproportal.com/2013/01/02/the-neuristor-and-the-future-of-computing/#ixzz2NpLisMKp...";


http://bit.ly/141PbRJ

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Future memory

Future memory | Information Technology [I.T] | Scoop.it

 

A new class of organic materials developed at Northwestern University boasts a very attractive but elusive property: ferroelectricity. The crystalline materials also have a great memory, which could be very useful in computer and cellphone memory applications, including cloud computing. A team of organic chemists discovered they could create very long crystals with desirable properties using just two small organic molecules that are extremely attracted to each other.

The attraction between the two molecules causes them to self assemble into an ordered network - order that is needed for a material to be ferroelectric.

The starting compounds are simple and inexpensive, making the lightweight materials scalable and very promising for technology applications. In contrast, conventional ferroelectric materials - special varieties of polymers and ceramics - are complex and expensive to produce. The Northwestern materials can be made quickly and are very versatile.


Via Sigalon
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What cloud computing really means

What cloud computing really means | Information Technology [I.T] | Scoop.it
The next big trend sounds nebulous, but it's not so fuzzy when you view the value proposition from the perspective of IT professionals
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33rd Square | Will Baxter And Other Robots Take Your Job?

33rd Square | Will Baxter And Other Robots Take Your Job? | Information Technology [I.T] | Scoop.it
At the Techonomy 2012 conference, Rodney Brooks of Rethink Robotics, MIT’s Andrew McAfee, and John Markoff of The New York Times took a closer look at the present and future of robotics some very interesting ideas arose about technological...
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The Future Of Web 2.0 Websites (Possibly Web 3.0)

The Future Of Web 2.0 Websites (Possibly Web 3.0) | Information Technology [I.T] | Scoop.it
Web 2.0 is the terminology assigned to define websites that have been refurbished from an earlier version of the internet.
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Samsung to introduce Eye Scroll feature on Galaxy S4? | Digital Trends

Samsung to introduce Eye Scroll feature on Galaxy S4? | Digital Trends | Information Technology [I.T] | Scoop.it
It looks like Samsung will be using another set of cool software features to make the new Galaxy S4 standout when it's announced later this month.
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Future Virtual Reality – Oh, Really? | Future Technology 500

Future Virtual Reality – Oh, Really? | Future Technology 500 | Information Technology [I.T] | Scoop.it
The future of virtual reality is outlined including present day technology and projections and prediction of how this high tech will evolve.
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Future Design Laptop ROLLTOP (Being Developed)

Laptop concept


Via Kyriakos Sidiropoulos
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