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Digital Divide and Social Media: Connectivity Doesn’t End the Digital Divide, Skills Do | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network

Digital Divide and Social Media: Connectivity Doesn’t End the Digital Divide, Skills Do | Guest Blog, Scientific American Blog Network | Information_Science | Scoop.it

As Internet technologies are rapidly evolving and new digital divides on the Internet emerge, we must not only be concerned over Internet access, but also on Internet skills, literacies and social media usage.


Via Eric Stockmeyer @stockmeyer1
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SnapIt - Screen Capture Software

SnapIt - Screen Capture Software | Information_Science | Scoop.it
Capture anything you see on your PC screen! SnapIt is convenient for bloggers who capture and crop images for ther posts, for tech writers who need to describe menus and interfaces of applications, web designers and those who work with graphics every day.
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Ecologists against public access to peer reviewed publications ...

Ecologists against public access to peer reviewed publications ... | Information_Science | Scoop.it
This next week is an important one for proponents of open access publication and data access, as the White House Office for Science and Technology Policy has requested public comments related to both these issues for federally funded research.

Via ghbrett
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Finding Balance in the Age of Digital Overload

Finding Balance in the Age of Digital Overload | Information_Science | Scoop.it

When the Author Dean Whitney says: "You need a “system” you can trust" I think it is right. Today we have so many information so that we really need a system [note Martin Gysler]

 

It's a new year and a great time to talk about goals and balance. If you are like me, your work is always with you. You wake up and check your email on the computer and if you're not near the computer, the iPhone or Blackberry is always within reach. As digital information becomes more accessible so to does our ability to communicate. For every actionable email there seems to be 10 emails with useful information and 100 useless cc's and spam emails. Then there’s the rest of life: mental, spiritual and physical realities. Our real world relationships, our dreams and our health needs to be in balance with all this digital information. Without proper and directed focus, years can go by without making significant progress.

 

Your life goals don’t ask you for permission to use “push notifications”

 

S.U.D.S or “Seemingly Unimportant Decisions”. Everyday we need to make hundreds, even thousands of decisions. From what to wear, eat, what time to get up, exercise, which emails to reply to, what to read, and how to spend our time. The problem is that all the really important and beneficial tasks don't bug you if you don’t perform them....


Via Martin Gysler
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On Facebook, Librarian Brings 2 Students From the Early 1900s to Life - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education

On Facebook, Librarian Brings 2 Students From the Early 1900s to Life - Wired Campus - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Information_Science | Scoop.it
Nifty use of Facebook by @unrkc to share alumni stories: http://t.co/AZrQsA2e. Much like @MaggieBoyd1873 project.

 

Facebook user “joe1915” writes wall posts that would be familiar to any college student these days: He stresses about tests, roots for his university’s football team, and shows off photos from campus dances.But Joe McDonald isn’t an average smartphone-toting student.

He died in 1971 — 33 years before Facebook arrived on the Web.

Donnelyn Curtis, the director of research collections and services at the University of Nevada at Reno, created Facebook profiles for Mr. McDonald and his wife, Leola Lewis, to give students a glimpse of university life during the couple’s college days. Ms. Lewis graduated in 1913, and Mr. McDonald earned his degree in mechanical engineering two years later.

With approval from Mr. McDonald’s granddaughter, Peggy McDonald, Ms. Curtis said she’s using archival material for a history project designed to appeal to a wider audience than the typical patrons of special collections.

“We’re just trying to help history come alive a little bit for students,” she said. At first, only extended family members bothered to “friend” with the pair’s profiles, but as the audience grew, Ms. Curtis said she had to find a humorous voice that would appeal to contemporary students who use Facebook every day.


Via Karen du Toit
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Google Launches Search, plus Your World and Lets You Finally Switch On Unpersonalized Results

Google's announcement for Search, plus Your World, opens up new ways of using search as well as an unexpected secondary feature/update which is going to make happy anyone who needs to frequently check Google search results without "personalization".

 

"Google Search has always been about finding the best results for you. Sometimes that means results from the public web, but sometimes it means your personal content or things shared with you by people you care about.

 

These wonderful people and this rich personal content is currently missing from your search experience. Search is still limited to a universe of webpages created publicly, mostly by people you’ve never met. Today, we’re changing that by bringing your world, rich with people and information, into search."

 

Google introduces today three new features:

 

1) Personal Results

which enable you to find information just for you, such as Google+ photos and posts—both your own and those shared specifically with you, that only you will be able to see on your results page;

 

2) Profiles in Search

both in autocomplete and results, which enable you to immediately find people you’re close to or might be interested in following; and,

 

3) People and Pages

which help you find people profiles and Google+ pages related to a specific topic or area of interest, and enable you to follow them with just a few clicks.

 

 

N.B.: Google is also introducing a prominent new toggle on the upper right of the results page where you can see what your search results look like without personal content. With a single click, you can see an unpersonalized view of search results.

That means no results from your friends, no private information and no personalization of results based on your Web History. This toggle button works for an individual search session, but you can also make this the default in your Search Settings.

 

Learn more at http://google.com/insidesearch/plus.html 

Read more: http://googleblog.blogspot.com/2012/01/search-plus-your-world.html   


Via Robin Good
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Who Says What on the Internet: Homeland Security Collects "Personal Identifiable Information" on Users of Social Media

Who Says What on the Internet: Homeland Security Collects "Personal Identifiable Information" on Users of Social Media | Information_Science | Scoop.it
Who Says What on the Internet: Homeland Security Collects "Personal Identifiable Information" on Users of Social Media http://t.co/lZcjNO0O...
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Health Literacy: Helping patients help themselves | EurActiv

Health Literacy: Helping patients help themselves | EurActiv | Information_Science | Scoop.it
Independent specialised European Union affairs portal for EU policy professionals. Expert EU policy journalists follow a wide range of European legislation and topics. Stories, interviews and articles are available in English, French and German.
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Excerpt Any Part of a YouTube Video and Republish It: TubeChop

Excerpt Any Part of a YouTube Video and Republish It: TubeChop | Information_Science | Scoop.it

TubeChop is a free web service which allows you to select a specific portion of any YouTube video, and publish it as such.

 

How does it work? You simply input the URL of the video you want to "cut" or a keyword to search for any video matching your query. 

Once you have loaded your chosen video you can manually select exactly the part of the video that you want to "chop out" and once you click the button "Update", you are immediately provided with a link and an embed code to share your excerpted video selection with anyone.

 

Very useful. 8/10.

 

Try it out now: http://www.tubechop.com/ 

 

(Reviewed by Robin Good)


Via Robin Good
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Operation Zero Inbox

Operation Zero Inbox | Information_Science | Scoop.it

I’m hearing more and more about companies that are starting to institute a zero email policy. For many types of businesses, email really doesn’t have a place. In my case, it’s the primary way that we communicate with prospects, clients and customers. Email marketing services is also one of the primary areas I do business in. There’s no getting away from it.


For the past 15 years, my incoming email load has been 2,000+ emails per day. Several years ago, it had actually peaked at around 10,000 emails per day. This year, I am running around 3,000-3,500 emails on a typical day.


Via Martin Gysler
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Magazine Editing: Managing Information Overload | Online Journalism Blog

Magazine Editing: Managing Information Overload | Online Journalism Blog | Information_Science | Scoop.it

I excerpted this interesting part from this article intro:

 

"A magazine editor now has little problem finding information on a range of topics. It is likely that you will have subscribed to email newsletters, RSS feeds, Facebook groups and pages, YouTube channels and various other sources of news and information both in your field and on journalistic or management topics.


There tend to be two fears driving journalists’ information consumption: the fear that you will miss out on something because you’re not following the right sources; and the fear that you’ll miss out on something because you’re following too many sources.

 

This leads to two broad approaches: people who follow everything of any interest (‘follow, then filter’); and people who are very strict about the number of sources of information they follow (‘filter, then follow’).

 

As an editor you are in the business of variety: you need to be exposed to a range of different pieces of information, and cannot afford to be caught out. A good strategy for managing your information feeds then, is to follow a wide variety of sources, but to add filters to ensure you don’t miss all the best stuff..."

 

Curated by Giuseppe Mauriello

[read full article http://j.mp/s08dSk]


Via Giuseppe Mauriello
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Curation Plays A Major Role in Successful Content Strategy - Here's Why

Curation Plays A Major Role in Successful Content Strategy - Here's Why | Information_Science | Scoop.it

This is an interesting article by Byron White, Founder of IdeaLaunch.

 

I love the way the author has positioned curation as a key element in content marketing strategy. He says that curation starts with the selection process of the right articles, then researching the assets of the competition.

 

In addition to adding context, also part of the process is learning how much content you need, how frequently to publish it and which channels of distribution, (social especially) required to capture organic market share.

 

Having said that, here are a few things the author said and my comments:

 

He says -"Who will win the content curation war of the web? The race to transform to high-quality publishing is officially on. It’s time to gather ideas, develop stories and publish quality content that keeps readers (and customers) coming back for more".

 

I say, I don't  think it's a war, I think it's an evolution, I think there will be many winners, it's not a race

 

He says, "We’ve all heard the expression Content is King. After all, content is the fuel behind the social media revolution currently sweeping the Web. Close examination of the art world, however, offers a solid case that curation, not content, may in fact be the ruler online."

 

I say:  I think it's a combination of both, original and curated content are both ruler online. I don't think it's either or.

 

What do you think?

 

Here's what caught my attention:

 

**The skill and savvy of a Content Strategist is equally as important as your Director of Marketing these days.

 

**Getting the right content to the right prospects at the right time is the key to content marketing success.

 

****But in the end, it’s not content that’s king. Instead, it’s the impact that the content has on us long after we pass it by.

 

****Great content is hard to create, curate, optimize and distribute. But when it all comes to together, it is the catalyst that makes your business better. And better than that.

 

Curated by Giuseppe Mauriello and Jan Gordon

 

[read full article http://j.mp/sPZqzu]


Via Giuseppe Mauriello, Robin Good, janlgordon
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Martin Gysler's comment, December 21, 2011 7:46 AM
I have downloaded the free eBook, thanks for the share!
Shirley Williams (appearoo.com/ShirleyWilliams)'s comment, December 21, 2011 10:33 AM
Nice find. Thank you for sharing.
janlgordon's comment, December 21, 2011 5:56 PM
Robin Good
This piece is excellent - thanks for sharing it!!
Rescooped by informationista from Content Curation World
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Create Curated Link-Maps: MindiT

MindIT is a free bookmarking service which allows you to easily bookmark any page on the web and to add it to a specific "link-map" you have created.

 

Link-maps can be searched and shared with others publicly.

 

Learn more while seeign one at work here: http://www.mindit-bookmarking.com/share?map=Cn6iUCxOacz02VH3w52aaX6847WawJOnxfff2KhRg1PgImHA78k99WyXf 

 

Here some sample link-maps: http://www.mindit-bookmarking.com/featured 

 

FAQ: http://www.mindit-bookmarking.com/faq 

 

Find out more: http://www.mindit-bookmarking.com/ 


Via Robin Good
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Neuroscience Information Framework

Neuroscience Information Framework | Information_Science | Scoop.it
The Neuroscience Information Framework is a dynamic inventory of web-based neuroscience resources, data, and tools for scientists and students. NIF is an initiative of the NIH Blueprint for Neuroscience Research.
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behindEars: Education Resources

behindEars: Education Resources | Information_Science | Scoop.it

NET (Business) – A free and open access educational video lectures repository. The lectures are given by distinguished scholars and scientists at the most important and prominent events like conferences, summer schools, ...


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Congress wants to limit open access publishing for the US ...

Congress wants to limit open access publishing for the US ... | Information_Science | Scoop.it
A new bill in Congress, H.R. 3699 ("To ensure the continued publication and integrity of peer-reviewed research works by the private sector"), creates a regulation that make it hard-to-impossible to publish open access ...

Via ghbrett
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Content curation and the power of collective intelligence

Content curation and the power of collective intelligence | Information_Science | Scoop.it

Here are a few gems that I recommend information professionals and content curators to check out


Via Viktor Markowski
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Ebooks on Fire: Controversies Surrounding Ebooks in Libraries | Against-the-Grain.com

Ebooks on Fire: Controversies Surrounding Ebooks in Libraries | Against-the-Grain.com | Information_Science | Scoop.it
Ebooks on Fire: Controversies Surrounding Ebooks in Libraries http://t.co/DIsal5KT (via @ATG_NewsChannel)...

 

Charles (Chuck) Hamaker takes an in-depth look at the challenges faced by ebooks “as transmitter, carrier, and shaper of our written word cultural heritage” – and what it means for libraries.

(The article is featured in the December 2011 issue of Searcher Magazine.)

 

Among the issues Chuck voices serious concerns about are:


• license agreements with revocable rights
• text that can be altered without notification, tracking, versioning, and archiving
• the lack of real ownership of ebooks by libraries
• roadblocks imposed by DRM software
• threats to patron confidentiality
• the long-term retention and preservation of ebooks
• restrictions on interlibrary loan lending
• limitations on placing ebooks on reserve in academic libraries
• use based pricing

 

Chuck then ends the article on an up note by offering some innovative suggestions that might enable ebooks to reach their full potential.

Needless to say, his article raises numerous questions for librarians, publishers and vendors alike. In short, it is more than worth the read.


Via Karen du Toit, NELLCO
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Catch The Best Content Out There: Trapit

Catch The Best Content Out There: Trapit | Information_Science | Scoop.it

Trap.it is a great new service which allows content curators as well as bloggers and web publishers of all kinds to find good quality content on the topics that are of greatest interest to them.

 

How it works:

 

a) First you provide a "search" query and Trap.it pulls together for you a dynamic page filled with content on topic.

 

b) You check the page and if you feel that it provides you with good content you can Trap.it and keep it available in your Trap.it account. That page will update itelf continuously.

 

c) Then you start voting on which type of stories and resources you find most relevant for your needs and Trap.it starts to improve its suggestions.

 

You can create as many Trap.it pages as you want, and you can directly share any item you like on Facebook, Twitter and Google+ or send it to anyone via email.

 

I find that tools like Trap.it interesting and badly needed, as now that it is so easy to publish, if you don't want to spend your whole day searching and vetting thin content of all kinds, you do need some more sophisticated news aggregation and filtering tools like this one.

 

N.B.: The traps you create are not shareable via their own URL. (For now at least) only individual stories can be shared.

 

The service is free.

 

Try it out here: http://trap.it/ 



(reviewed by Robin Good)


Via Robin Good
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Jeremy Cherfas's comment, January 11, 2012 8:11 AM
I think it was a problem with trying to use the system too quickly after registering. Each time I clicked on one of those buttons, it took me to the Save this Trap dialogue. An hour or so later, everything worked fine.

I really like some of the content it is throwing up, and hoping it will learn well too.

I also like that you can get access to the pure link, up on the left hand side.
Henry "Hank" Nothhaft, Jr.'s comment, January 11, 2012 2:12 PM
Robin - thanks for reviewing Trapit. Just wanted to let you know sharable traps are coming very soon. This month, if things go according to plan. :)
Robin Good's comment, January 12, 2012 1:51 AM
Hello Henry, that's great news! Thank you for coming by and sharing it!
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Amazon.com: Biometrics: Identity Assurance in the Information Age eBook: John Woodward, Nicholas M. Orlans, Peter T. Higgins: Kindle Store

Amazon.com: Biometrics: Identity Assurance in the Information Age eBook: John Woodward, Nicholas M. Orlans, Peter T.
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Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research]

Curating Information & Making Sense of Data Is a Key Skill for the Future [Research] | Information_Science | Scoop.it

Extremely valuable skills for Infrmation Professionals of the future:

 

Robin Good: The Institute for the Future and the University of Phoenix have teamed up to produce, this past spring, an interesting report entitled Future Work Skills 2020.

 

By looking at the set of emerging skills that this research identifies as vital for future workers, I can't avoid but recognize the very skillset needed by any professional curator or newsmaster.

 

It should only come as a limited surprise to realize that in an information economy, the most valuable skills are those that can harness that primary resource, "information", in new, and immediately useful ways.

 

And being the nature of information like water, which can adapt and flow depending on context, the task of the curator is one of seeing beyond the water,

to the unique rare fish swimming through it.

 

The curator's key talent being the one of recognizing that depending on who you are fishing for, the kind of fish you and other curators could see within the same water pool, may be very different. 

 

 

Here the skills that information-fishermen of the future will need the most:

 

1) Sense-making:

ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed

 

2) Social intelligence:

ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions

 

3) Novel and adaptive thinking:

proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based

 

4) Cross-cultural competency:

ability to operate in different cultural settings

 

5) Computational thinking:

ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning

 

6) New media literacy:

ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication

 

7) Transdisciplinarity:

literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines

 

8) Design mindset:

ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes

 

9) Cognitive load management:

ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques

 

10) Virtual collaboration:

ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team

 

 

Critical to understand the future ahead. 9/10

 

Curated by Robin Good

 

Executive Summary of the Report: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-work-skills-executive-summary.pdf 

 

Download a PDF copy of Future Work Skills 2020: https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapolloresearchinstitute.com%2Fsites%2Fdefault%2Ffiles%2Ffuture-skills-2020-research-report.pdf  


Via Robin Good, janlgordon, Karen du Toit
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Beth Kanter's comment, December 20, 2011 7:34 PM
Thanks for sharing this from Robin's stream. These skills sets could form the basis of a self-assessment for would-be curators, although they're more conceptual - than practical/tactical. Thanks for sharing and must go rescoop it with a credit you and Robin of course
janlgordon's comment, December 20, 2011 7:56 PM
Beth Kanter
Agreed. It's also one of the articles I told you about....good info to build on:-)
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, September 4, 2014 2:34 AM

Curating Information and Data Sense-Making Is The Key Skill for the Future [Research]

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What I Wish I Knew The First Year of Blogging: Part II

What I Wish I Knew The First Year of Blogging: Part II | Information_Science | Scoop.it
I hope you enjoyed part one of what I learned the first year.

 

The original post was packed with so much information that I had to break it down into two parts or otherwise risk being labeled as verbose as Nitty.

 

The following are the remainder of the tips I learned the first year of blogging.

 

Take action. Do a little bit everyday.

 

It is easy to get caught up in reading, learning and planning on the internet. Plan away but if you don’t take action then you will get nowhere. If you don’t know where to start, then break your blog down into baby steps.

 

Take a week to map out your niche, then the next to map out what you want to include in your site? The following to come up with a logo and tagline and so on. You may need less than a week for each task.


Via Martin Gysler
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50 Google Analytics Resources

50 Google Analytics Resources | Information_Science | Scoop.it
Google Analytics is one of the most valuable resources for webmasters, marketers, business owners, bloggers, and anyone who does practically anything online. The following are 50 resources to help you get to know Google Analytics inside and out.

Via Alex Butler
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Making Web Content Relevant: CircleMe

Making Web Content Relevant: CircleMe | Information_Science | Scoop.it

Our vision with CircleMe is to create an online environment where users can take advantage of technology and the social web to enjoy more their passions and interests in life (i.e., their “likes”).

The way we want to achieve this is by asking users to “connect” to the things and topics they love, and then CircleMe will leverage clever algorithms along with the power of the social graph to surface relevant content and new items tailored to each user.


Via The New Company
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OsakaSaul's comment, December 24, 2011 2:51 AM
thanks for re-scooping this!
Rescooped by informationista from Libraries throughout the world
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National Libraries Day - February 4th

National Libraries Day is a whole day devoted to all types of libraries, library users, staff and supporters across the UK.

Via Fabricio Cárdenas
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