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This Scoop-It has been curated by Helen Rowling to update those interested in keeping abreast with new ideas and innovations of the day. Enjoy the discovery journey!
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Rescooped by Helen Rowling from Geography Education
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Largest glacier calving ever filmed

"On May 28, 2008, Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland. The calving event lasted for 75 minutes and the glacier retreated a full mile across a calving face three miles wide. The height of the ice is about 3,000 feet, 300-400 feet above water and the rest below water."

 

Tags: physical, geomorphology, landforms, erosion, climate change, Greenland.


Via Seth Dixon
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Flaviu Fesnic's comment, April 12, 12:31 PM
impressive !
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, April 13, 7:37 AM

More information at www.chasingice.com

Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, April 13, 11:15 AM

Adam LeWinter and Director Jeff Orlowski filmed a historic breakup at the Ilulissat Glacier in Western Greenland

Rescooped by Helen Rowling from Geography Education
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Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands

Aerial Photographs Catalogue the Life and Death of Volcanic Islands | Information Services | Scoop.it

Volcanic islands can seem to appear out of nowhere, emerging from the ocean like breaching monsters of the deep. Below, Mika McKinnon explains how these odd geological formations are born, how they evolve, and how they eventually vanish back beneath the waves.


Via Seth Dixon
Helen Rowling's insight:

Geographical wonders.

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Tracey M Benson's curator insight, April 7, 2:15 PM

Insight from Seth Dixon:

Where an island is along this developmental continuum says much about the human populations that may inhabit said island.  If the island is tall and young with rich volcanic soil, the mountain will attract rainfall and the soil could support agriculture, making the island able to sustain a higher population density.  On the other hand, an old, eroding island with little rainfall and depleted soils will need human inhabitants to rely on the ocean's resources for food and would thus support a more minimal population.  These islands are changing, even if the time scale is slow--but just recently two disconnected islands 'merged' as growing volcanic island has expanded in the Pacific. 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 3:14 PM

In many cases these islands that become seriously dangerous started off being very small and then erupted causing formations of small islands next to them or attached and then creating erupting volcanic islands.

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 4:59 PM

This article gives a good description of how volcanic islands grow and then die.  It has beautiful pictures of these types of islands.