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Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder: Nassim Nicholas Taleb

Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder

~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb (author) More about this product
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Nassim Nicholas Taleb, the bestselling author of The Black Swan and one of the foremost thinkers of our time, reveals how to thrive in an uncertain world.

Just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension, and rumors or riots intensify when someone tries to repress them, many things in life benefit from stress, disorder, volatility, and turmoil. What Taleb has identified and calls “antifragile” is that category of things that not only gain from chaos but need it in order to survive and flourish.

In The Black Swan, Taleb showed us that highly improbable and unpredictable events underlie almost everything about our world. In Antifragile, Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, even necessary, and proposes that things be built in an antifragile manner. The antifragile is beyond the resilient or robust. The resilient resists shocks and stays the same; the antifragile gets better and better.


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Walter Stickle's curator insight, December 14, 2012 10:14 AM

Despite the fact the the writing is deliberately provocative, carelessly dogmatic and typically lacking in rigour... the books central thesis is both highly important and almost completely lacking in our culture's worldview.  Read it!

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Philosophy of Complex Systems

Philosophy of Complex Systems | Information, Complexity, Computation | Scoop.it

The domain of nonlinear dynamical systems and its mathematical underpinnings has been developing exponentially for a century, the last 35 years seeing an outpouring of new ideas and applications and a concomitant confluence with ideas of complex systems and their applications from irreversible thermodynamics. A few examples are in meteorology, ecological dynamics, and social and economic dynamics. These new ideas have profound implications for our understanding and practice in domains involving complexity, predictability and determinism, equilibrium, control, planning, individuality, responsibility and so on.

Our intention is to draw together in this volume, we believe for the first time, a comprehensive picture of the manifold philosophically interesting impacts of recent developments in understanding nonlinear systems and the unique aspects of their complexity. The book will focus specifically on the philosophical concepts, principles, judgments and problems distinctly raised by work in the domain of complex nonlinear dynamical systems, especially in recent years.

 

Philosophy of Complex Systems

Edited by Cliff Hooker


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The emerging science of 'collective intelligence' — and the rise of the global brain

The emerging science of 'collective intelligence' — and the rise of the global brain | Information, Complexity, Computation | Scoop.it

Over at the Edge there's a fascinating article by Thomas W. Malone about the work he and others are doing to understand the rise of collective human intelligence — an emergent phenomenon that's being primarily driven by our information technologies. We may be on an evolutionary trajectory, he argues, that could someday give rise to the global brain. And amazingly, he's developing an entirely new scientific discipline to back his case.


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How to License Research Data | Digital Curation Centre

How to License Research Data | Digital Curation Centre | Information, Complexity, Computation | Scoop.it
This guide will help you to license research data...
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Einstein's brain 'exceptionally complicated' - Telegraph

Einstein's brain 'exceptionally complicated' - Telegraph | Information, Complexity, Computation | Scoop.it
Albert Einstein's brain contained an unusually high number of folds which may have provided him with the ability to think in "extraordinary ways", scientists claim.
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Microsoft gets patent on augmented reality glasses as 'AR wars' start

Microsoft gets patent on augmented reality glasses as 'AR wars' start | Information, Complexity, Computation | Scoop.it
Filing points to AR systems which would provide instant replays and song lyrics - but translation service might mean broader use, as past Apple patents suggest it is looking at the sector too.
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Artificial intelligence makes startling advances

Intersting article by John Markoff on artificial neural networks  and learning theorems and big data problems. Using an artificial intelligence technique inspired by theories about how the brain recognizes patterns, technology companies are reporting startling gains in fields as diverse as computer vision, speech recognition and the identification of new molecules... Click on the title to learn more.


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Checklist for Programming Intel® Xeon PhiTM Coprocessors

Checklist for Programming Intel® Xeon PhiTM Coprocessors | Information, Complexity, Computation | Scoop.it
Key tips for programming a high degree of parallelism, while using familiar programming methods and the latest Intel® tools supporting the Intel® Xeon PhiTM coprocessor.
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SFI’s Massive Open On-Line Courses

Santa Fe Institute will be launching a series of MOOCs (Massive Open On-line Courses), covering the field of complex systems science. Our first course, Introduction to Complexity, will be an accessible introduction to the field, with no pre-requisites. You don't need a science or math background to take this introductory course; it simply requires an interest in the field and the willingness to participate in a hands-on approach to the subject.
In this ten-week course, you'll learn about the tools used by complex systems scientists to understand, and sometimes to control, complex systems. The topics you'll learn about include dynamics, chaos, fractals, information theory, computation theory, evolution and adaptation, agent-based modeling, and networks. You’ll also get a sense of how these topics fit together to help explain how complexity arises and evolves in nature, society, and technology.
Introduction to Complexity will be free and open to anyone. The instructor is Melanie Mitchell, External Professor at SFI, Professor of Computer Science at Portland State University, and author of the award-winning book, Complexity: A Guided Tour. The course will begin in early 2013.


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Complejidady Economía's comment, November 6, 2012 10:58 AM
Gracias por el post
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Working in the Social World: Complex Adaptive Systems

Keynote presentation on managing complex social systems and process, very interesting description of communities development

 

from Defrag 2012 (RT @rhappe: A big thank you to @defrag for a great #defragcon - here are my slides on managing complex adaptive systems - http://t.co/eJAgkeKT...)...


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Long-range navigation on complex networks using Lévy random walks

We introduce a strategy of navigation in undirected networks, including regular, random, and complex networks, that is inspired by Lévy random walks, generalizing previous navigation rules. We obtained exact expressions for the stationary probability distribution, the occupation probability, the mean first passage time, and the average time to reach a node on the network. We found that the long-range navigation using the Lévy random walk strategy, compared with the normal random walk strategy, is more efficient at reducing the time to cover the network. The dynamical effect of using the Lévy walk strategy is to transform a large-world network into a small world. Our exact results provide a general framework that connects two important fields: Lévy navigation strategies and dynamics on complex networks.

 

Long-range navigation on complex networks using Lévy random walks

A. P. Riascos and José L. Mateos

Phys. Rev. E 86, 056110

http://link.aps.org/doi/10.1103/PhysRevE.86.056110


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Detecting Causality in Complex Ecosystems

Identifying causal networks is important for effective policy and management recommendations on climate, epidemiology, financial regulation, and much else. We introduce a method, based on nonlinear state space reconstruction, that can distinguish causality from correlation. It extends to nonseparable weakly connected dynamic systems (cases not covered by the current Granger causality paradigm). The approach is illustrated both by simple models (where, in contrast to the real world, we know the underlying equations/relations and so can check the validity of our method) and by application to real ecological systems, including the controversial sardine-anchovy-temperature problem.

 

Detecting Causality in Complex Ecosystems
George Sugihara, Robert May, Hao Ye, Chih-hao Hsieh, Ethan Deyle, Michael Fogarty, Stephan Munch

Science 26 October 2012:
Vol. 338 no. 6106 pp. 496-500
http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.1227079


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How Computational Models Predict the Behavior of Complex Systems

In this paper, we argue for the centrality of prediction in the use of computational models in science. We focus on the consequences of the irreversibility of computational models and on the conditional or ceteris paribus, nature of the kinds of their predictions. By irreversibility, we mean the fact that computational models can generally arrive at the same state via many possible sequences of previous states. Thus, while in the natural world, it is generally assumed that physical states have a unique history, representations of those states in a computational model will usually be compatible with more than one possible history in the model. We describe some of the challenges involved in prediction and retrodiction in computational models while arguing that prediction is an essential feature of non-arbitrary decision making. Furthermore, we contend that the non-predictive virtues of computational models are dependent to a significant degree on the predictive success of the models in question.

 

How Computational Models Predict the Behavior of Complex Systems
John Symons and Fabio Boschetti

FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENCE
2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10699-012-9307-6


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Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder: Nassim Nicholas Taleb

Antifragile: Things That Gain from Disorder

~ Nassim Nicholas Taleb (author) More about this product
List Price: $30.00
Price: $16.95
You Save: $13.05 (44%)

Nassim Nicholas Taleb, the bestselling author of The Black Swan and one of the foremost thinkers of our time, reveals how to thrive in an uncertain world.

Just as human bones get stronger when subjected to stress and tension, and rumors or riots intensify when someone tries to repress them, many things in life benefit from stress, disorder, volatility, and turmoil. What Taleb has identified and calls “antifragile” is that category of things that not only gain from chaos but need it in order to survive and flourish.

In The Black Swan, Taleb showed us that highly improbable and unpredictable events underlie almost everything about our world. In Antifragile, Taleb stands uncertainty on its head, making it desirable, even necessary, and proposes that things be built in an antifragile manner. The antifragile is beyond the resilient or robust. The resilient resists shocks and stays the same; the antifragile gets better and better.


Via Complexity Digest
more...
Walter Stickle's curator insight, December 14, 2012 10:14 AM

Despite the fact the the writing is deliberately provocative, carelessly dogmatic and typically lacking in rigour... the books central thesis is both highly important and almost completely lacking in our culture's worldview.  Read it!

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Information Is Power, But Is it Powerful Enough to Halt Climate Change?

Information Is Power, But Is it Powerful Enough to Halt Climate Change? | Information, Complexity, Computation | Scoop.it
In a world where almost one billion people are chronically hungry and the current and future state of food security is beset by challenges such as climate change, knowledge and information are powerful.
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Jonas Eliasson: How to solve traffic jams

It’s an unfortunate reality in nearly every major city—road congestion, especially during rush hours. Jonas Eliasson reveals how subtly nudging just a small percentage of drivers to stay off major roads can make traffic jams a thing of the past.


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Surviving Armageddon - Paranoid or Mad?

Surviving Armageddon - Paranoid or Mad? | Information, Complexity, Computation | Scoop.it
These people have spent their entire lives and thousands of pounds preparing for a disaster.
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The Brain in the Machine: I.B.M's Compass

The Brain in the Machine: I.B.M's Compass | Information, Complexity, Computation | Scoop.it

I.B.M. has just announced the world’s grandest simulation of a brain, all running on a collection of ninety-six of the world’s fastest computers. Are full-scale simulations of human brains imminent, as some media accounts seem to suggest? Good article in the New Yorker, on the Compass project to simualte the brain of a Macaque monkey using the neuromorphic engineering approach pioneered by Carver Mead. Worth reading. Click on the the title or image to learn more.


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Parallel Programing: Goals, Skills, Platforms, Markets, Languages

How are software developers and their organizations adapting to new parallel computing architectures? How broad is the market for parallelism, software acceleration and optimization?
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The Dynamics of Nestedness Predicts the Evolution of Industrial Ecosystems

In economic systems, the mix of products that countries make or export has been shown to be a strong leading indicator of economic growth. Hence, methods to characterize and predict the structure of the network connecting countries to the products that they export are relevant for understanding the dynamics of economic development. Here we study the presence and absence of industries in international and domestic economies and show that these networks are significantly nested.

 

Bustos S, Gomez C, Hausmann R, Hidalgo CA (2012) The Dynamics of Nestedness Predicts the Evolution of Industrial Ecosystems. PLoS One 7(11): e49393. http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0049393


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Journal on Self Computing (JSC)

Journal on Self Computing (JSC) | Information, Complexity, Computation | Scoop.it

Journal on Self Computing (JSC), a quarterly peer-reviewed journal, aims to provide a prestigious forum for researchers and practitioners world-wide to exchange new results in design and development of computers, networks, and control systems with self-properties, where examples of self-properties include self-stabilizing, self-organizing, self-repairing, self-healing, self-adaptive, self-aware, self-coordinating, self-protecting, etc. Its scope includes:

Autonomic and adaptive systems
Self-optimizing and self-protecting systems
Self-organizing computing and networking techniques
Impossibility results and lower bounds on self-computing
Self-properties and their relation with classical fault-tolerance and security
Self-techniques for sensor networks, ad-hoc networks, vehicular networks
Self-control and actuation systems
Cyber-physical systems with self-properties
Bio-inspired techniques on self-systems
Stochastic, physical, and biological models with self-properties


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Bio-Inspired Political Systems. Opening a Field

In this paper we highlight the scopes of engineering bio-inspired political systems, which are political systems based on the properties of life that self-organize the increasing complexity of human social systems. We describe bio-inspired political systems and conjecture about various ways to get to them, most notably, metaheuristics, modeling and simulation and complexified topologies. Bio-inspired political systems operate with nature-based dynamics, inspired on the knowledge that has been acquired about complexity from natural social systems and life. Bio-inspired political systems are presented as the best alternative for organizing human sociopolitical interactions as computation and microelectronics-based technology profoundly modify the ways in which humans decide. Therefore, weakening classical political systems. For instance, dwindling top-down power structures, modifying the notion of geographical spatiality and augmenting the political granularity. We also argue that, more than a new theoretical proposal, bio-inspired political systems are coming to be the political systems of the future.

 

Bio-Inspired Political Systems. Opening a Field

Nathalie Mezza-Garcia

http://arxiv.org/abs/1211.2787


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Single-celled amoebae can remember, make decisions and anticipate change - slime molds redefine intelligence

Single-celled amoebae can remember, make decisions and anticipate change - slime molds redefine intelligence | Information, Complexity, Computation | Scoop.it

Something scientists have come to understand is that slime molds are much smarter than they look. One species in particular, the SpongeBob SquarePants–yellow Physarum polycephalum, can solve mazes, mimic the layout of man-made transportation networks and choose the healthiest food from a diverse menu—and all this without a brain or nervous system. "Slime molds are redefining what you need to have to qualify as intelligent," Reid says.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald, Complexity Digest
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Complexity, Networks, and Non-Uniqueness

The aim of the paper is to introduce some of the history and key concepts of network science to a philosophical audience, and to highlight a crucial—and often problematic—presumption that underlies the network approach to complex systems. Network scientists often talk of “the structure” of a given complex system or phenomenon, which encourages the view that there is a unique and privileged structure inherent to the system, and that the aim of a network model is to delineate this structure. I argue that this sort of naïve realism about structure is not a coherent or plausible position, especially given the multiplicity of types of entities and relations that can feature as nodes and links in complex networks.

 

Complexity, Networks, and Non-Uniqueness
Alan Baker

FOUNDATIONS OF SCIENCE
2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10699-012-9300-0


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