Informal Learning
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How does technology change learning and teaching in formal and informal education?

How does technology change learning and teaching in formal and informal education? | Informal Learning | Scoop.it

"It seems that the days of the Socratic teacher are fast fading. The digital world gives everyone an opportunity to find his or her own expert, not necessarily in the classroom. The Internet and other digital resources provide students and teachers with the means to reach out to the world and extract the information that they find most interesting, whatever it may be."


Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge
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Libraries as Informal Learning Spaces— excerpt from the first Chapman Prize Report + Call for 2013 Prize

Libraries as Informal Learning Spaces— excerpt from the first Chapman Prize Report + Call for 2013 Prize | Informal Learning | Scoop.it
The Call for the 2013 Perry Chapman Prize is live through May only. Respondents are asked to address the question: 
How does the physical campus support instit…

Via Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)
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Society for College and University Planning (SCUP)'s curator insight, May 3, 2013 12:49 PM

SCUP will soon publish the monograph, "Research on Learning Space Design: Present State, Future Directions," by Susan Painter, Janice Fournier, Caryn Grape, Phyllis Grummon, Jill Morelli, Susan Whitmer, and Joseph Cevetello. This team received the 2012 Perry Chapman Prize to support their work.


From the introduction to the report from the 2012 recipients:


"Although several hundred articles and a number of books on these topics had been written by the fall of 2012, the field is still at an early stage of development. A first step in creating value from this existing body of work is to gather, summarize, and evaluate how far the field has come in identifying the elements that will allow us to thoughtfully design learning spaces and evaluate their impact. This was the purpose of the project being reported here: a literature review undertaken by a small group of researchers and campus architects/planners who had applied for and been awarded a small grant from the Perry Chapman estate, administered through the Sasaki Foundation in honor of M. Perry Chapman and administered by the Society for College and University Planning."


GIBS Information Centre / GIBSIC's curator insight, May 7, 2013 2:41 AM

Library spaces - "The researchers used mapping exercises, student-gathered photographs, surveys, interviews, and design charrettes. Their findings paint a detailed picture of students’ study lives that has implications for institutions that want to make the library relevant to those lives: 

Students are highly scheduled and on the go all of the time. There is no “average” day for a student. Academic, social, recreational, work, volunteer, and personal activities are all in the mix and each day is different. They eat on the go and carry their belongings with them, although they don’t carry their laptops. Students’ schedules are “offset” from librarians’ schedules. Students study in the library, at home/in their dorms, and in the computer lab. They use computer technology throughout the day and in multiple locations.

 The researchers also reported results from the design charrettes that show student needs and preferences:

Flexibility: spaces that meet a variety of needs. Students want to move easily among the spaces. Group and individual study areas are important, as are spaces to relax, a café, and computing and media viewing areas.   Comfort: spaces that provide comfort and have a “family room” atmosphere. This includes easy access to coffee and food, natural light, and an environment with soothing textures, sounds, and great warmth. The space should support sitting, slouching, putting one’s feet up, and lying down.  Technology: technology and tools should be intuitively integrated into the space. This includes high-end technology such as media players, smart boards, and plasma screens as well as low-tech items such as power outlets, staplers, and three-hole punch tools.Staff support: Students rarely made distinctions between the types of staff they needed in the library; rather, they expected to interact with a generic staff member who would be able to provide reference assistance, check out materials, answer IT questions, and brew a great latte. There were very few mentions of a reference or information desk. Librarians cannot assume that they know how students do their academic work or what they need.Resources: students included library materials in their designs, ranging from academic and reference books to leisure magazines and DVDs.  " Ackn. SCUP
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Diana Rhoten on Sparking Student Interests with Informal Learning (Big Thinkers Series)

Sociologist and digital learning expert Diana Rhoten founded the New Youth City Learning Network to help organizations like museums and libraries design digi...
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Applying Informal Learning Using a Social Gaming Platform by Eran Gal & Irad Eichler

Applying Informal Learning Using a Social Gaming Platform by Eran  Gal & Irad  Eichler | Informal Learning | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, September 22, 2013 10:57 PM

“Informal learning takes different forms, even when channeled into a formal process such as an online cross-company social game. The OD group recommends gaining an initial grasp of user reaction and experience before launching on a massive scale.”

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Coughlan, T. and Perryman, L.-A. - Beyond the ivory tower: a model for nurturing informal learning and development communities through open educational practices

Coughlan, T. and Perryman, L.-A. - Beyond the ivory tower: a model for nurturing informal learning and development communities through open educational practices | Informal Learning | Scoop.it

Open Educational Resources (OER) and Open Educational Practices (OEP) are making an evergrowing impact on the field of adult learning, offering free high-quality education to increasing numbers of people. However, the top-down distribution of weighty university courses that typifies current provision is not necessarily suitable for contexts such as Continued Professional Development (CPD). This article proposes that a change of focus from a supplier-driven to a needs-led approach, grounded in theories of informal learning, could increase the positive impact of OER and OEP beyond the ivory towers of higher education.

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