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Data should not be used as a drunk uses a lamppost

Data should not be used as a drunk uses a lamppost | Infographics | Scoop.it
There is a very strong tendency in business and in public policy­-making for people to favour arguments based on mathematical models ­– for bad reasons as well as good. As with the use of market research, by removing any subjectivity from a decision, you are also distancing yourself from responsibility for the consequences of that decision. Computer says no.

Bureaucracy is a construction designed to maximize the distance between a decision-maker and the risks of the decision
Nassim Taleb

And this is where big data becomes dangerous. Because there will be an ever-present temptation for this data to be used in the wrong way ­– not to make better decisions. There is a kind of naive scientism present in business which leads people to think that any argument presented in numerical form is automatically more objective, accurate and secure than one that uses words.

Yet there are enormous risks and problems inherent in all mathematical models (witness the “statistically impossible” financial collapse of 2008). And the larger the amounts of data involved, the greater the risks of misplaced confidence.

Statistical models are the autistic savants of our age: simultaneously brilliant and foolish. They can understand what people do, but can never understand why. They are prone to extraordinary delusions and equally immense blindspots: spurious correlations, backwards causations or confounding variables cause them to see things which aren’t there and to ignore things which aren’t.

The human brain uses pure reason very selectively. It is perhaps involved in only a small minority of our decisions. In a way, our brains seem to use the reason the way we use our satnavs, (or as Kirk uses Spock) –­ as something we consult but do not allow to decide. There may be a very good evolutionary reason why this is so. In an uncertain, complex world, there is only so much which reason should be allowed to decide.
European Works Councils Research's insight:

There is a very strong tendency in business and in public policy­-making for people to favour arguments based on mathematical models ­– for bad reasons as well as good. As with the use of market research, by removing any subjectivity from a decision, you are also distancing yourself from responsibility for the consequences of that decision. Computer says no.

Bureaucracy is a construction designed to maximize the distance between a decision-maker and the risks of the decision

Nassim Taleb

And this is where big data becomes dangerous. Because there will be an ever-present temptation for this data to be used in the wrong way ­– not to make better decisions. There is a kind of naive scientism present in business which leads people to think that any argument presented in numerical form is automatically more objective, accurate and secure than one that uses words.

Yet there are enormous risks and problems inherent in all mathematical models (witness the “statistically impossible” financial collapse of 2008). And the larger the amounts of data involved, the greater the risks of misplaced confidence.

Statistical models are the autistic savants of our age: simultaneously brilliant and foolish. They can understand what people do, but can never understand why. They are prone to extraordinary delusions and equally immense blindspots: spurious correlations, backwards causations or confounding variables cause them to see things which aren’t there and to ignore things which aren’t.

The human brain uses pure reason very selectively. It is perhaps involved in only a small minority of our decisions. In a way, our brains seem to use the reason the way we use our satnavs, (or as Kirk uses Spock) –­ as something we consult but do not allow to decide. There may be a very good evolutionary reason why this is so. In an uncertain, complex world, there is only so much which reason should be allowed to decide.

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Infographic: Big data on small Business

Infographic: Big data on small Business | Infographics | Scoop.it
Infographic: Big data on small Business. How Big data is going to impact small business to gain more benefits and data handling for them. Check it out now!
European Works Councils Research's insight:

A lot of text, but still seems ok.

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Reasons Why Infographics Are Important - Blog

Reasons Why Infographics Are Important - Blog | Infographics | Scoop.it
Infographics are visual representations of information, data or knowledge. It is an important tool. Read more Reasons Why Infographics Are Important - Blog
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Why Your Brain Loves Visual Content - infographic

Why Your Brain Loves Visual Content - infographic | Infographics | Scoop.it
Humans are biologically wired to process the world visually, which is why making content more visual increases its impact and efficacy.
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Will your generation have a better life than your parents?

Will your generation have a better life than your parents? | Infographics | Scoop.it
A new survey by Ipsos Mori has found that young people in the west are particularly pessimistic about their future. See how the results break down by country
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Datawrapper

Datawrapper | Infographics | Scoop.it
Datawrapper is an open source tool helping everyone to create simple, correct and embeddable charts in minutes.
European Works Councils Research's insight:

Will be exploring soon in a Guardian Masterclass course.

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Qlikview vs Tableau? I have to choose and I'm not sure

Qlikview vs Tableau? I have to choose and I'm not sure | Infographics | Scoop.it
An Excel user trying to choose: Qlikview vs Tableau. Do they overlap? Which one is the best for me?
European Works Councils Research's insight:

1) In data visualization, there is an ugly side (data cleansing, ETL) and a glamorous side (visualization). Apparently, Tableau focus on the glamorous side only, while Qlikview offers both ETL and visualization tools (yes, they don’t look that good).

That’s enough to heat up the discussion about the role, limits and skills of a data visualization expert. How much overlap there is between visualization and ETL? Should we improve both skill sets or focus on one of them?

ETL is a thankless job and I’m glad Joe Mako brought it up. The way I see it now it that if you choose Tableau, not much will change in your ETL processes. Tableau just seats there, showing off its glorious charts. If you get Qlikview instead, you will be able to replicate some of current ETL processes. And if you are using Excel and Access for ETL (I use them a lot), it should be much faster (that’s what I hope). If you see ETL and visualization as two completely different processes requiring different skill sets maybe having Tableau and a dedicated ETL tool is a good idea.

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Qlikview vs Tableau? I have to choose and I'm not sure

Qlikview vs Tableau? I have to choose and I'm not sure | Infographics | Scoop.it
An Excel user trying to choose: Qlikview vs Tableau. Do they overlap? Which one is the best for me?
European Works Councils Research's insight:

I like its enthusiastic and knowledgeable community. Let me give you two simple examples. I spent a lot of time making this horizon chart in Excel, and Joe Mako quickly came up with a better version in Tableau.

 

And as a blogger, I want to make my work available to the web, and Tableau Public is a nice option (my population pyramid).

The Guardian often publishes Tableau visualizations. I’d like to try that with the local newspapers here.

 

 

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Business Intelligence (BI) Software Vendors and Resellers

Business Intelligence (BI) Software Vendors and Resellers | Infographics | Scoop.it
Listing of reputable vendors and resellers that offer business intelligence (BI) software solutions.
European Works Councils Research's insight:
Tableau Software helps people see and understand data. Ranked by Gartner in 2011 as the world’s fastest growing business intelligence company, Tableau helps anyone quickly and easily analyze, visualize and share information. More than 7,000 companies get rapid results with Tableau in the office and on-the-go. And tens of thousands of people use Tableau Public to share data in their blogs and websites. See how Tableau can help you by downloading the free trial at www.tableausoftware.com/trial.

Articles submitted by this company:

5 Best Practices for Creating Effective DashboardsTop 10 BI Trends for 2012Add Maps to Your Analysis and Dashboards

 

www.tableausoftware.comFusionCharts

FusionCharts adds both glamour and meaning to the data in your dashboards. It converts all your boring data to lively visuals and with highly interactive features like drill-down and one-click export, it offers you a complete dashboarding experience too. It is chosen and trusted by over 80% of the Fortune 500 companies.

 

www.fusioncharts.com
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How to Create Graphs & Data Visualizations | eHow

How to Create Graphs & Data Visualizations | eHow | Infographics | Scoop.it
Graphs and data visualizations are extremely helpful tools for presenting large amounts of data in a more pleasing and digestible form than a traditional spreadsheet. While many software programs are available that can create graphs or data visualizations, most are extremely costly. Fortunately, there are a number of different free programs and...
European Works Councils Research's insight:

Download and install the free Tableau Public data visualization tool in order to create data visualizations. The software is capable of reading data files created by Microsoft Excel and Access as well as data stored in a number of different text file formats. Once the data is loaded into the software, the software automatically saves the data on Tableau servers so that it can be accessed and manipulated online. While the Tableau software is a powerful tool, users with large amounts of data may need to take advantage of other tools as the software only works with up to 50 megabytes of data.

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JavaScript Motion Chart | amCharts

Motion-chart and Motion-map demo made using amCharts JavaScript charting and mapping library. Inspired by GapMinder.
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Choosing the right visualization tool for your task

Choosing the right visualization tool for your task | Infographics | Scoop.it
We’re frequently asked: What is the best tool to visualize data? There is obviously no single answer to that question. It depends on the task at hand, and what you want to achieve. Here’s an attemp...
European Works Councils Research's insight:
Charts for the Web

 

There are plenty – dozens, if not hundreds – of programming libraries that allow you to add charts to your web sites. Frankly, most of them are sh*t. Some of the more flashy ones use Flash or even Silverlight for their graphics, and there are strong reasons for not depending on browser plugins for delivering your graphics.

 

We believe we have tested most of the libraries out there, and there are only two we feel comfortable recommending, each has its pros and cons depending on what you are looking for:

Highcharts

Special Requirements and Custom Visualizations

If you want full control of the look, feel and interactivity of your charts, or if you want to create a custom data visualization for the web from scratch, the out-of-the box libraries mentioned above will not suffice.

In fact – you’ll be surprised how soon you run into limitations that will force you to compromise on your design. Seemingly simple preferences such as “I don’t want drop shadows on the lines in my line chart”, or “I want to control what happens when a user clicks the X-axis” and you may already be stretching it with your chosen library. But consider yourself warned: The compromises may well be worth it. You may not have the time and resources to spend diving deeper, let alone writing yet-another-charting-tool™

However, if you are not one to compromise on your standards, or if you want to take it up a notch and follow the lead of some of the wonderful and engaging data journalism happening at the likes of the NY Times and The Guardian, you’re looking for something that a charting library is simply not designed to do.

DataMarket blog

Data, visualization and startup life

Choosing the right visualization tool for your task

with 9 comments

We’re frequently asked: What is the best tool to visualize data?

There is obviously no single answer to that question. It depends on the task at hand, and what you want to achieve.

Here’s an attempt to categorize these tasks and point to some of the tools we’ve found to be useful to complete them:

The right tool for the taskSimple one-off charts

The most common tool for simple charting is clearly Excel. It is possible to make near-perfect charts of most chart types using Excel – if you know what you’re doing. Many Excel defaults are sub-optimal, some of the chart types they offer are simply for show and have no practical application. 3D cone shaped “bars” anyone? And Excel makes no attempt at guiding a novice user to the best chart for what she wants to achieve. Here are three alternatives we’ve found useful:

Tableauis fast becoming the number one tool for many data visualization professionals. It’s client software (Windows only) that’s available for $999 and gives you a user-friendly way to create well crafted visualizations on top of data that can be imported from all of the most common data file formats. Common charting in Tableau is straight-forward, while some of the more advanced functionality may be less so. Then again, Tableau enables you to create pretty elaborate interactive data applications that can be published online and work on all common browser types, including tablets and mobile handsets. For the non-programmer that sees data visualization as an important part of his job, Tableau is probably the tool for you.Tableau’s visual gallery is a great way to see what the program is capable of.DataGraphis a little-known tool that deserves a lot more attention. A very different beast, DataGraph is a Mac-only application ($90 on the AppStore) originally designed to create proper charts for scientific publications, but has become a powerful tool to create a wide variety of charts for any occasion. Nothing we’ve tested comes close to DataGraph when creating crystal-clear, beautiful charts that are also done “right” as far as most of the information visualization literature is concerned. The workflow and interface may take a while to get the grips of, and some of the more advanced functionality may lie hidden even from an avid user for months of usage, but a wide range of samples, aggressive development and an active user community make DataGraph a really interesting solution for professional charting. If you are looking for a tool to create beautiful, yet easy to understand, static charts DataGraph may be your tool of choice. And if your medium is print, DataGraph outshines any other application on the market.The best way to see samples of DataGraph’s capabilities is to download the free trial and browse the samples/templates on the application’s startup screen.R is an open-source programing environment for statistical computing and graphics. A super powerful tool, R takes some programming skills to even get started, but is becoming a standard tool for any self-respecting “data scientist”. An interpreted, command line controlled environment, R does a lot more than graphics as it enables all sorts of crunching and statistical computing, even with enormous data sets. In fact we’d say that the graphics are indeed a little bit of a weak spot of R. Not to complain about the data presentation from the information visualization standpoint, most of the charts that R creates would not be considered refined and therefore needs polishing in other software such as Adobe Illustrator to be ready for publication. Not to be missed if working with R is the ggplot2 packagethat helps overcome some of the thornier of making charts and graphs for R look proper. If you can program, and need a powerful tool to do graphical analysis, R is your tool, but be prepared to spend significant time to make your outcome look good enough for publication, either in R or by exporting the graphics to another piece of software for touch-up.The R Graphical Manual holds an enormous collection of browsable samples of graphics created using R – and the code and data used to make a lot of them.Videos and custom high-resolution graphics

If you are creating data visualization videos or high-resolution data graphics, Processing is your tool. Processing is an open source integrated development environment (IDE) that uses a simplified version of Java as its programming language and is especially geared towards developing visual applications.

Processing is great for rapid development of custom data visualization applications that can either be run directly from the IDE, compiled into stand-alone applications or published as Java Applets for publishing on the web.

Java Applets are less than optimal for web publication (ok, they simply suck for a variety of reasons), but a complementary open-source project – Processing.js – has ported Processing to JavaScript using the canvas element for rendering the visuals (canvas is a way to render and control bitmap rendering in modern web browsers using JavaScript). This is a far superior way to take processing work online, and strongly recommended in favor to the Applet.

The area where we have found that Processing really shines as a data visualization tool, is in creating videos. It comes with a video class called MovieMaker that allows you to compose videos programmatically, frame-by-frame. Each frame may well require some serious crunching and take a long time to calculate before it is appended to a growing video file. The results can be quite stunning. Many of the best known data visualization videos are made using this method, including:

Aaron Koblin’s Flight PatternsJer Thorp’s Kepler Exoplanet CandidatesDataMarket’s own Earthquakes and Eruptions

Many other great examples showing the power of Processing – and for a lot more than just videos – can be found in Processing.org’s Exhibition Archives.

As can be seen from these examples Processing is obviously also great for rendering static, high-resolution bitmap visualizations.

So if data driven videos, or high-resolution graphics are your thing, and you’re not afraid of programming, we recommend Processing.

Charts for the Web

There are plenty – dozens, if not hundreds – of programming libraries that allow you to add charts to your web sites. Frankly, most of them are sh*t. Some of the more flashy ones use Flash or even Silverlight for their graphics, and there are strong reasons for not depending on browser plugins for delivering your graphics.

We believe we have tested most of the libraries out there, and there are only two we feel comfortable recommending, each has its pros and cons depending on what you are looking for:

Highcharts

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Choosing the right visualization tool for your task

Choosing the right visualization tool for your task | Infographics | Scoop.it
We’re frequently asked: What is the best tool to visualize data? There is obviously no single answer to that question. It depends on the task at hand, and what you want to achieve. Here’s an attemp...
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Data should not be used as a drunk uses a lamppost

Data should not be used as a drunk uses a lamppost | Infographics | Scoop.it
It’s easy for big data to lead businesses and governments astray if used to justify or defend bad decisions, rather than make better ones
European Works Councils Research's insight:

Where things go wrong is where tools of this kind are used not as an aid to thinking but as a substitute for thinking. When the information provided is used (this was one of David Ogilvy’s favourite quotations) “… as a drunk uses a lamppost: for support rather than illumination.”

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Związki zawodowe schodzą do podziemia

Związki zawodowe schodzą do podziemia | Infographics | Scoop.it
Polskie związki zawodowe? Owszem, górnicy, nauczyciele, pielęgniarki są pod ich parasolem. Ale pracownicy większości firm, branż, zawodów nie mają żadnej reprezentacji wobec swoich pracodawców. Dlaczego?
European Works Councils Research's insight:

Dr Piotr Ostrowski, socjolog z UW, pewnie nie wyspecjalizowałby się w zagadnieniach stosunków pracy, gdyby nie doświadczenie z czasów studenckich. Początki polskiej transformacji, tzw. handel wielkopowierzchniowy rozkwitał, zatrudnili się w kilku kolegów w jednym z supermarketów budowlanych, założyli związek zawodowy, po 10 dniach wszyscy jego inicjatorzy byli już zwolnieni. Jedni z „utraty zaufania”, inni dyscyplinarnie (palenie w miejscu niedozwolonym, poruszanie się wózkiem widłowym w celach pozaregulaminowych), jeszcze inni – otrzymawszy „propozycję nie do odrzucenia” – natychmiastowe przeniesienie do innych miast. Sądzili się cztery lata. Powygrywali. Formalnie przywróceni do pracy nie byli już nią, oczywiście, zainteresowani. Jak pewnie większość spośród 56 tys. pracowników, których sprawy toczą się dziś przed wydziałami pracy sądów rejonów (średnio siedem miesięcy; rekordziści czekają na orzeczenie osiem lat).

Dr Ostrowski burzy się, ilekroć związki zawodowe mierzy się uproszczoną miarą – widzi się w nich wyłącznie „kółka wzajemnej adoracji panów po pięćdziesiątce”, biurokratów pod nadmierną ochroną, akcentuje polityczne alianse i ciemne interesy bossów, egoizm w obronie przywilejów branżowych, zgoła kibolskie metody nacisku. Pisząc doktorat, badał postawy aktywistów drugiego planu. To zwykle „społecznicy od zawsze”, osoby popularne, lubiane, budzące zaufanie, a przede wszystkim z tradycją: wujek w Solidarności, mama w ZNP. Mają raczej poglądy lewicowe, a na pewno ponadstandardową wrażliwość.

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Your essential 'how-to' guide to using Prezi in an academic environment

Your essential 'how-to' guide to using Prezi in an academic environment | Infographics | Scoop.it
Presentation boredom can be a significant barrier to academic communication. Ned Potter provides guidance on the strengths and weaknesses of Prezi as a fresh approach to the PowerPoint doldrums. Pr...
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Anti-EU vote could rise above 30% in European elections, says thinktank

Anti-EU vote could rise above 30% in European elections, says thinktank | Infographics | Scoop.it
Hardline sceptics could get 29% of vote and critical reformers 5%, although Open Europe's definitions of groups are disputed
European Works Councils Research's insight:

If voter turnout is 43%, roughly the same as in 2009, Open Europe estimate that 74.4% of all voters will have either voted against the EU, for radical change or not bothered to vote at all, with only 25.6% of all eligible voters actively voting in favour of status quo/more integration parties.

"For the European parliament to pursue an explicitly integrationist agenda on such a thin public mandate would not be democratically honest – and would most likely serve to fuel the anti-EU vote even further," Open Europe said.

Open Europe and Absolute Strategy both agree that the anti-EU vote spanning left, right and populist will not act as a coherent bloc.

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ETUI report underlines the costs of austerity | New European Trade Unions Forum

ETUI report underlines the costs of austerity | New European Trade Unions Forum | Infographics | Scoop.it
By Steve Coulter, LSE Just out from the European Trade Union Institute (ETUI) is ‘Benchmarking Working Europe 2014’, the ETUI’s annual stock-take of macro
European Works Councils Research's insight:

By Steve Coulter, LSE

Just out from the European Trade Union Institute (ETUI) is ‘Benchmarking Working Europe 2014’, the ETUI’s annual stock-take of macro-economic, social and bargaining conditions in Europe. Reflecting the impact of five years of austerity, it makes for fairly gloomy reading. Statistical indicators in the report show not only that the crisis is not ending, it’s actually still getting worse. The ETUI tracks a clutch of negative trends in things like inequality and social conditions alongside signs of a dismantling of national social models.

 

The report tries to answer the question of whether Europe is still suffering the consequences of crisis, or if the current situation is the result of disastrous policy choices. If the latter, then is there a viable alternative? Arguably, the period from 2008-2009 saw an all too brief Keynesian interlude in policy responses to the crisis as European governments backed a global strategy of reflation.  But this gave way to an obsessive focus on austerity policies which have pushed Europe to the edge of deflation, says the ETUI. But it now appears that the IMF, ECB, European Commission ‘Troika’, blamed for pushing austerity on weak economies in need of more stimulus were, in fact, far from unanimous that this was a good idea.

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Qlikview vs Tableau? I have to choose and I'm not sure

Qlikview vs Tableau? I have to choose and I'm not sure | Infographics | Scoop.it
An Excel user trying to choose: Qlikview vs Tableau. Do they overlap? Which one is the best for me?
European Works Councils Research's insight:

In regards to working with real time data, Tableau is not well suited for this task, Tableau is not designed to deal with steaming data, Tableau issues queries and then renders the results.

For real time data visualization I would recommend Processing or Cubism.js and for ETL of real time data you would need a CEP (Complex Event Processor) like Streambase.

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Qlikview vs Tableau? I have to choose and I'm not sure

Qlikview vs Tableau? I have to choose and I'm not sure | Infographics | Scoop.it
An Excel user trying to choose: Qlikview vs Tableau. Do they overlap? Which one is the best for me?
European Works Councils Research's insight:

So, generally, Tableau gets out of the way and let’s you get your work done.

 

 

We went through a Tableau vs. Qlikview (and others) selection process last year, chose Tableau, and have been very happy with the results. Often I’m spending a huge amount of my day obtaining and wrangling the data and have limited time for real analysis. Tableau’s interface makes the analysis incredibly productive and satisfying. An advantage of Tableau’s UX is that it lets me fail faster. A lot of my work is about looking for patterns, Tableau enables me to check out dozens to hundreds of possibilities in very little time, views that would take a lot longer to set up in other tools.

Even though Tableau might not have some of the fine-grained controls over dashboard appearance that other tools like Excel do, it gets me to the my real goal of useful output faster. Tableau delights me in a way that no other piece of PC software ever has, and for me that’s a really great thing to be able to say about something I’m sitting in front of for hours at a time.

In terms of learning Tableau and making connections, Tableau the company publishes a huge amount of free training material, there’s Tableau Public, and an active Tableau community. That was an important factor for us since we’re relatively remote. The ability to download a Tableau Public visualization or a packaged workbook file (for Tableau Desktop users) is a massive advantage to learning, you can see something you like and take it apart within seconds and figure out how to do it yourself. Given the quality of your designs, I have no doubt you’d pick up Tableau very quickly.

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The 36 best tools for data visualization | Web design | Creative Bloq

The 36 best tools for data visualization | Web design | Creative Bloq | Infographics | Scoop.it
It's often said that data is the new world currency, and the web is the exchange bureau through which it's traded. As consumers, we're positively swimming in data; it's everywhere from labels on food packaging design to World Health Organisation reports.
European Works Councils Research's insight:

Consider for future choice.

Pay attention to interactive map software.

Scroll down for comments to explore further tools: Gantt chart

DHTMLX also has a Gantt chart for project visualization:
http://www.dhtmlx.com/docs/products/dhtmlxGantt/index.shtml

 

Maps: www.instantatlas.com (used by WHO)

 

Qlickview (interactive infographics)

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to BI or not to BI?

to BI or not to BI? | Infographics | Scoop.it
Short answer on this soliloquy: Data Visualization. Long Answer: read this blog (I guess soliloquy is what people used before blogs). BI is a marketing term, Intelligence is an attribute of human. ...
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DV Leaders: Qlikview, Spotfire, Tableau, VisokioDV Misleaders: SAP, IBM, SAS, Oracle, Microsoft, Microstrategy, Information Builders.BI Vendors: Actuate, Panorama, Visual Mining, Pagos, Panopticon, Pentaho, Jaspersoft, Advizor Solutions, arcplan, …BDA Vendors: Teradata, EMC, Paradigm4, Vertica/HP, VoltDB, Infobright, …SDK Vendors for DV DIY (Do It Yourself) optimists and money/time wasters: Dundas, Infragistics, ComponentArt, FusionCharts, DevExpress, ComponentOne, Telerik, …
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Data visualisation startup FusionCharts clocked under $10M revenues in FY13, claims 21,000 customers | Techcircle.in - India startup news, internet, mobile, e-commerce, software, online businesses,...

Data visualisation startup FusionCharts clocked under $10M revenues in FY13, claims 21,000 customers | Techcircle.in - India startup news, internet, mobile, e-commerce, software, online businesses,... | Infographics | Scoop.it
Kolkata-based Infosoft Global Pvt Ltd, the company that owns and operates data visualisation library FusionCharts, claims to have clocked under Rs 50 crore
European Works Councils Research's insight:

A boot-strapped company to date, FusionCharts has been profitable from day one, claims Nadhani. He observed that the lines are blurring between exclusive data visualisation companies like FusionCharts, and others like Tableau Software (www.tableausoftware.com) and Qliktech (www.qlikview.com) which were in the broader business intelligence space traditionally but are now starting to beef up their visualisation capabilities.

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5 Must Read Books on Visualizing Data

5 Must Read Books on Visualizing Data | Infographics | Scoop.it
DataMarket is currently teaching a course on "Acquiring and Visualizing" at Reykjavik University. We describe it as "the nerds’ guide to the visualization process from acquiring data to designing t...
European Works Councils Research's insight:
The Wall Street Journal Guide to Information Graphics

The Dos and Don’ts of Presenting Data, Facts, and Figures- Dona M. Wong

A super practical guide to effective communication through graphs and charts. Concise, well written, easy to navigate and frequently referred to by our designer and programmers alike.

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Highcharts - Graphs gallery

European Works Councils Research's insight:

Highcharts is an online library of charts. An alternative to FusionCharts and possibly Tableau.

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