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Influence et contagion
L'influence et la contagion dans la cyberculture
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5 Questions for Duncan Watts | #SNA #influence

luiy's insight:

Duncan J. Watts, principal researcher at Microsoft Research, is the 2014 winner of the Everett M. Rogers Award. The USC Annenberg Norman Lear Center got to sit down with him and ask him 5 questions about his talk "Social Influence in Markets & Networks: What's So Viral About Going "Viral"? 

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The Harlem Shake Story: Birth of a #Meme | #SNA #virality #datascience

The Harlem Shake Story: Birth of a #Meme | #SNA #virality #datascience | Influence et contagion | Scoop.it
A series of remixed videos along with a number of key communities around the world triggered a rapid escalation, giving the meme widespread global visibility. Who were the initial communities behind this mega-trend? SocialFlow took a look at 1.9 million tweets during a two-week period that included the words ’harlem shake’, or some versions of it. 
luiy's insight:

Social Flow looked at the social connections amongst users who were posting to the meme. This gave them the ability to identify the underlying communities engaging with the meme at a very early stage. In the graph above each node represents a user that was actively posting and referencing the Harlem Shake meme on Feb 7 or 8 to Twitter. Connections between users reflect follow/friendship relationships. The graph is organized using a force directed algorithm, and colored based on modularity, highlighting dominant clusters - regions in the graph which are much more interconnected. These clusters represent groups of users who tend to have some attribute in common. The purple region in the graph (left side) represents African American Twitter users who are referencing Harlem Shake in its original context. There's very little density there as it is not really a tight-knit community, but rather a segment of users who are culturally aligned, and are clearly much more interconnected amongst themselves than with other groups.

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Research: The #Emotions that Make Marketing Campaigns Go #Viral | by @kristintynski | #contagion

Research: The #Emotions that Make Marketing Campaigns Go #Viral | by @kristintynski | #contagion | Influence et contagion | Scoop.it
Heat maps of viral content show what compels us to share.
luiy's insight:

Create content the strikes the correct emotional chords

 

While there is a good deal of evidence to suggest that strong emotions are key to viral sharing, there are a scarce few that indicate which emotions work best.

 

To this end, one of the best ways we’ve found to understand the emotional drivers of viral content is to map the emotions activated by some of the Internet’s most viral content.

 

In order to understand the best emotional drivers to use in the content we create, we looked at 30 of the top 100 images of the year from imgur.com as voted on Reddit.com (one of the top sharing sites in the world). We then surveyed 60 viewers to find out which emotions each image activated for them. We used Robert Plutchik’s comprehensive Wheel of Emotion as our categorization.

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#Predicting Successful #Memes using Network and Community Structure | #SNA #contagion

#Predicting Successful #Memes using Network and Community Structure | #SNA #contagion | Influence et contagion | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

We investigate the predictability of successful memes using their early spreading patterns in the underlying social networks. We propose and analyze a comprehensive set of features and develop an accurate model to predict future popularity of a meme given its early spreading patterns. Our paper provides the first comprehensive comparison of existing predictive frameworks. We categorize our features into three groups: influence of early adopters, community concentration, and characteristics of adoption time series. We find that features based on community structure are the most powerful predictors of future success. We also find that early popularity of a meme is not a good predictor of its future popularity, contrary to common belief. Our methods outperform other approaches, particularly in the task of detecting very popular or unpopular memes.

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António F Fonseca's curator insight, April 2, 2014 6:01 AM

Another paper about popularity prediction.

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Creating Social #Contagion Through #Viral Product #Design: A Randomized Trial of Peer #Influence in Networks

Creating Social #Contagion Through #Viral Product #Design: A Randomized Trial of Peer #Influence in Networks | Influence et contagion | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

We examine how firms can create word-of-mouth peer influence and social contagion by designing viral features into their products and marketing campaigns. To econometrically identify the effectiveness of different viral features in creating social contagion, we designed and conducted a randomized field experiment involving the 1.4 million friends of 9,687 experimental users on Facebook.com. We find that viral features generate econometrically identifiable peer influence and social contagion effects. More surprisingly, we find that passive-broadcast viral features generate a 246% increase in peer influence and social contagion, whereas adding active-personalized viral features generate only an additional 98% increase. Although active-personalized viral messages are more effective in encouraging adoption per message and are correlated with more user engagement and sustained product use, passive-broadcast messaging is used more often, generating more total peer adoption in the network. Our work provides a model for how randomized trials can identify peer influence in social networks.


Article in:  http://icos.umich.edu/sites/icos6.cms.si.umich.edu/files/lectures/VPDFinal1110.pdf

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Twitter Trends Help Researchers Forecast Viral #Memes | #SNA #contagion

Twitter Trends Help Researchers Forecast Viral #Memes | #SNA #contagion | Influence et contagion | Scoop.it
Researchers are forecasting which memes will spread far and wide
luiy's insight:

What makes a meme— an idea, a phrase, an image—go viral? For starters, the meme must have broad appeal, so it can spread not just within communities of like-minded individuals but can leap from one community to the next. Researchers, by mining public Twitter data, have found that a meme's “virality” is often evident from the start. After only a few dozen tweets, a typical viral meme (as defined by tweets using a given hashtag) will already have caught on in numerous communities of Twitter users. In contrast, a meme destined to peter out will resonate in fewer groups.

 

“We didn't expect to see that the viral memes were going to behave very differently from nonviral memes at their beginnings,” says Lilian Weng, a graduate student in informatics at Indiana University Bloomington. Those differences allowed Weng and her colleagues to forecast memes that would go viral with an accuracy of better than 60 percent, the team reported in a 2013 study.

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How Videos Go #Viral part | / #metrics #SNA #contagion

How Videos Go #Viral part | / #metrics #SNA #contagion | Influence et contagion | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

This is a big post with a lot of variables and data. So let’s recap on what we’re saying overall. How do viral videos spread socially?

We can see there are 2 broad patterns of content diffusion. One model we call “spike” – the sudden ‘explosion’ of sharing activity – and the other we call “growth”, where popularity is a slower and steadier grower.  The metrics we’ve discussed, such as velocity, variability and social currency, provide a way to identify which kind of virality you’re looking:

 

 

http://www.facegroup.com/blog/how-videos-go-viral.html

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Truthy: Information Diffusion in Online Social Networks | #influence #virality #SNA

Truthy: Information Diffusion in Online Social Networks | #influence #virality #SNA | Influence et contagion | Scoop.it
luiy's insight:

The focus of this research project is understanding how information propagates through complex socio-technical information networks. Leveraging large-scale public data from online social networking platforms, we are able to analyze and model the spread of information, from political discourse to market trends, from news to social movements, and from trending topics to scientific results, in unprecedented detail.

 

We study how popular sentiment, user influence, attention, social network structure, and other factors affect the manner in which information is disseminated. Additionally, an important goal of the Truthy project is to better understand how social media can be abused, for example by astroturfing.

 

Our work to date includes a number of core research themes:

 

1. We study how individuals’ limited attention span affects what information we propagate and what social connections we make, and how the structure of social networks can help predict which memes are likely to become viral.

 

2. We explore social science questions via social media data analytics. Examples of research to date include analyses of geographic and temporal patterns in movements like Occupy Wall Street, societal unrest in Turkey, polarization and cross-ideological communication in online political discourse, partisan asymmetries in online political engagement, the use of social media data to predict election outcomes and forecast key market indicators, and the geographic diffusion of trending topics.

 

3. Truthy is an ensemble of web services and tools to demonstrate applications of our data mining research, from visualizing meme diffusion patterns to detecting social bots on Twitter.

 

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BeerBergman's curator insight, September 3, 2014 5:45 PM

"luiy's insight:

The focus of this research project is understanding how information propagates through complex socio-technical information networks. Leveraging large-scale public data from online social networking platforms, we are able to analyze and model the spread of information, from political discourse to market trends, from news to social movements, and from trending topics to scientific results, in unprecedented detail.

 

We study how popular sentiment, user influence, attention, social network structure, and other factors affect the manner in which information is disseminated. Additionally, an important goal of the Truthy project is to better understand how social media can be abused, for example by astroturfing."

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News Information Flow Tracking, Yay! (NIFTY) : System for large scale real-time tracking of #memes | #datascience #algorithms

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How Gangnam Style" Went #Viral | #SNA #contagion #datascience

How Gangnam Style" Went #Viral | #SNA #contagion #datascience | Influence et contagion | Scoop.it
Data scientists trace how the most-viewed video in YouTube history spread across the Internet
luiy's insight:

When South Korean pop star Psy released his “Gangnam Style” video in 2012 it spread like wildfire. Researchers at Indiana University Bloomington tracked the spreading meme by following how Twitter users shared the video with friends and strangers alike. By the time 200 tweets had linked to the video among the subset of Twitter users studied, “Gangnam Style” had already reached 86 different communities of users (blue nodes). After 3,000 tweets the meme had spread to nearly 1,000 different communities (green). “Gangnam Style” soon became the most-viewed video in YouTube history; by late 2013, the video had amassed more than 1.8 billion views.

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#Virality Prediction and Community Structure in Social Networks | #SNA #memes #contagion

#Virality Prediction and Community Structure in Social Networks | #SNA #memes #contagion | Influence et contagion | Scoop.it
How does network structure affect diffusion? Recent studies suggest that the answer depends on the type of contagion. Complex contagions, unlike infectious diseases (simple contagions), are affected by social reinforcement and homophily.
luiy's insight:

Our method aims to discover viral memes. To label viral memes, we rank all memes in our dataset based on numbers of tweets or adopters, and define a percentile threshold. A threshold of θT or θUmeans that a meme is deemed viral if it is mentioned in more tweets than θT% of the memes, or adopted by more users than θU% of the memes, respectively. All the features are computed based on the first 50 tweets for each hashtag h. Two baselines are set up for comparison. Random guessselects nviral memes at random, where nviral is the number of viral memes in the actual data.Community-blind prediction employs the same learning algorithm as ours but without the community-based features. We compute both precision and recall for evaluation; the former measures the proportion of predicted viral memes that are actually viral in the real data, and the latter quantifies how many of the viral memes are correctly predicted. Our community-based prediction excels in both precision and recall, indicating that communities are helpful in capturing viral memes (Fig. 5). For example, when detecting the most viral memes by users (θU = 90), our method is about seven times as precise as random guess and over three times as precise as prediction without community features. We achieve a recall over 350% better than random guess and over 200% better than community-blind prediction. Similar results are obtained using different community detection methods or different types of social network links (see SI).

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