Influence et contagion
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Influence et contagion
L'influence et la contagion dans la cyberculture
Curated by luiy
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How to Burst the "Filter Bubble" that Protects Us from Opposing Views | #algorithms #homophily

How to Burst the "Filter Bubble" that Protects Us from Opposing Views | #algorithms #homophily | Influence et contagion | Scoop.it
Computer scientists have discovered a way to number-crunch an individual’s own preferences to recommend content from others with opposing views. The goal? To burst the “filter bubble” that surrounds us with people we like and content that we agree with.
luiy's insight:

The term “filter bubble” entered the public domain back in 2011when the internet activist Eli Pariser coined it to refer to the way recommendation engines shield people from certain aspects of the real world.

 

Pariser used the example of two people who googled the term “BP”. One received links to investment news about BP while the other received links to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, presumably as a result of some recommendation algorithm.

 

This is an insidious problem. Much social research shows that people prefer to receive information that they agree with instead of information that challenges their beliefs. This problem is compounded when social networks recommend content based on what users already like and on what people similar to them also like.

 

This is the filter bubble—being surrounded only by people you like and content that you agree with.

 

And the danger is that it can polarise populations creating potentially harmful divisions in society.

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Homophily and Influence in Social Networks

See this post for an explanation of what this means, and the last section of my paper with Andrew Thomas (link below) for the technical/methodological questions which most interest me in this area. Query: to what extent do the same problems show up when looking at other sorts of networks, say of neurons, or of gene regulatory elements? Recommended:...
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Homophily - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Homophily (i.e., "love of the same") is the tendency of individuals to associate and bond with similar others. The presence of homophily has been discovered in a vast array of network studies. More than 100 studies that have observed homophily in some form or another and they establish that similarity breeds connection.[1] These include age, gender, class, and organizational role.[2] This is often expressed in the adage "birds of a feather flock together". Individuals in homophilic relationships share common characteristics (beliefs, values, education, etc.) that make communication and relationship formation easier. Homophily often leads to homogamy—marriage between people with similar characteristics.[1]
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The Evolution of Homophily : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group #sna #influence

The Evolution of Homophily : Scientific Reports : Nature Publishing Group #sna #influence | Influence et contagion | Scoop.it
Homophily, the tendency to interact with others of similar type, is widely observed in nature. Sex- and age-related homophily, for example, shapes the formation of clusters of preferred companionships in zebras1, dolphins2, and predicts both the quantity and quality of many primate interactions3, 4. Meerkats tend to assortatively associate with other group members of similar attributes in dominance and foraging networks5. And across many dimensions of phenotypes, humans exhibit high levels of homophily in social tie formation6, 7, 8. In fact, recent evidence suggests that humans may even exhibit genotypic homophily, meaning that individuals with a certain genotype are more likely to be friends with others of the same genotype9. Heterophily, the tendency to interact with others of different type, also exists in nature at both the cellular10, 11, 12 and organismic levels. For example, research on collaboration networks suggests that people are likely to form heterophilic task-related ties with those who are complementary to their own skill sets8. Analogously, hunter-gatherer life is characterised by long-term imbalances in productivity and consumption, and by the division of labour13; hence, one might possibly expect that social interactions would, at least in part, be heterophilic, offering complementary advantages to interacting parties; but they are not7.
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