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Which music services are growing, which are shrinking

Which music services are growing, which are shrinking | Music Industry Hot Topics | Scoop.it
Here's a quick tour of google trends output for a number of music services with an eye for identifying which are growing and which are shrinking. Google trends tracks search interest.  The number 1...
Gustavo Garcia's insight:

Taking a look at some google trends of music services ,which track interests from users the author identifies and shows trough graphics which music services are growing and which are shrinking. The ones that are rising are music streaming services which look like are going to take over, it will be interesting to see the graphics again in the years to come.

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Chris Grissom's curator insight, April 23, 11:35 PM

my insights

Here’s a quick summary that sperates  the growing and shrinking off music streaming :
 
Rising:
Spotify, Soundcloud, Rdio, Songza, SiriusXM, iheartradio, 8tracks, bandcamp, Google Music, Mixcloud, Shazam Muve, Ex.fm, Radionomy, Music Unlimited
 
Steady:
Amazon Mp3, Beatport, iTunes, Pandora, Youtube
 
Slight decline:
Slacker, Jango, Soundhound, xbox music
 
Falling:
Rhapsody, Deezer, Grooveshark, Turntable.fm,MOG, Hype Machine, Playlist.com, Walmart, Yahoo Music, Myspace Music, Facebook Music, Zune, Last.fm, Twitter Music, radio.com
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Digital Music Downloads Are Plummeting As Users Turn To Streaming

Digital Music Downloads Are Plummeting As Users Turn To Streaming | Music Industry Hot Topics | Scoop.it
In terms of raw downloads, Nielsen showed 682.2 million paid downloads through June 30th, compared with 698 million at the same point last year.
Gustavo Garcia's insight:

With the downfall of digital music downloads and the growth of music streaming services the whole industry is being affected and it may change everything about it soon.

 

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Chris Grissom's curator insight, April 23, 11:41 PM

In terms of raw downloads, Nielsen showed 682.2 million paid downloads through June 30th, compared with 698 million at the same point last year.

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A Unique Digital Music Service, For Locals Only : NPR

A Unique Digital Music Service, For Locals Only : NPR | Music Industry Hot Topics | Scoop.it
Just as e-books have begun working their way into libraries, librarians are grappling with how to embrace digital music. At the Iowa City Public Library, an unusual licensing arrangement with local artists is having some success.
Gustavo Garcia's insight:

Pros: Local artist could get a lot of exposure in their home towns were their audience could relate to them more, just beacuse they reperesent and with that initial support it will be easier to expand those artist outside their home town.

 

Cons: there is no actual revenue from donating the muic to a libraries database.

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Chris Grissom's curator insight, April 23, 11:37 PM

insight This is the Iowa City Library Local Music Project. The idea for it came to retired librarian John Hiett while he was sitting in a bar, watching a performance by one of his favorite local artists. He realized he was spending the library's budget on a bunch of musicians who weren't from Iowa.

"I was watching Dave Zollo play, and I thought, you know, he's so good, how come we ship all our music budget out of town? How come we don't do more with this?" Hiett says. "And I may have had a few at that point, but I had the sense to email myself with the idea."

Here's what he came up with: If you have an Iowa City library card and a computer, you can download more than 100 albums by local musicians — free. You own them forever. Hiett says a lot of the music is older and out of print, but some bands don't have a problem just giving the library a new recording.

"A couple times, I suggested to people, 'You don't want to give us this brand-new album; it might cut into your sales' — and they didn't seem to care," Hiett says. "I think a lot of times, local record sales are sort of negligible."

That's true for Zollo. He makes most of his money on the road and has given most of his back catalog to the digital library.

"I think it's a good way to do business: If you believe in your product, hey, take it for a spin," Zollo says. "People are going to be taking it anyway. People that want it, love it, will still buy it, I've found. The people that want to just check it out, this gives them an opportunity without putting everybody in this compromised situation where they're breaking the law and you have to play the angry intellectual-property owner and it doesn't make sense."

Zollo owns the licensing rights to his music; he makes $100 for every album he lets the library add to its digital collection. (More well-known Iowa musicians like William Elliott Whitmore and Greg Brown are fans of the library project, but their work belongs to their record labels.) The library has averaged about 10 downloads per album in its first year. Matt Kearney says he downloaded pretty much everything when the project launched.

"There's so much music on it now that you can't really do that anymore," Kearney says. "But a lot of times, there's bands where you see their posters around and you're just kind of curious. I was at a music festival here this weekend and heard a bunch of bands. I'll probably download their albums and check 'em out."

There's a lot to check out, from jazz to punk and plenty of Americana. (This is Iowa, after all.)

Librarians across the country have caught wind of Iowa City's project, and the Nashville (Tenn.) Public Library is planning to use it as a foundation for something that goes a bit further. Librarian Jared Brennan says the Nashville system plans to curate a history of the city's music that goes beyond country to include hip-hop, alt-rock and other genres and make it available beyond city limits.

"Initially, we were going to make it for library-card holders only," Brennan says. "But it's been decided to do it where we're still curating a Nashville music culture as a permanent online, streamable and downloadable archive, but also allowing that to be available for the world at large."

Back at Iowa City's only library, under buzzing fluorescent lights in a back room, librarian Paulios goes through boxes of donated music from another era, each full of about 75 CDs.

"This one's got a bunch of classical," he says, pointing out discs as he sorts them. "We've got Neil Young, we've got jazz ... Miles Davis."

Paulios says CD donations like this are frequent. He says it's wonderful not having to spend money on adding great music to the library's collection so users can still check out physical CDs the old-fashioned way. He's also now in charge of the Iowa City Library Local Music Project, and he has about $6,000 in his budget to diversify the digital collection next year.

But, as he looks over the boxes of CDs, he's reminded of the downside of the digital music revolution: "You know, you won't be able to donate your iTunes copy of Miles Davis."

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Music Industry Grows First Time in a Decade on Digital Adele

Music Industry Grows First Time in a Decade on Digital Adele | Music Industry Hot Topics | Scoop.it
The worldwide recorded music industry’s revenue grew 0.3 percent to $16.5 billion last year, the first increase in more than decade, as more people downloaded music and used online streaming sites.
Gustavo Garcia's insight:

Is good to see a grow as small as it is in the recorded music industry, it only grew 0.3 percent to 16.5 billion last year. Also digital sales rose 9 percent to 5.6 billion to account 34 percent of total revenue, music industry is adapting to the digital world.

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Raymond Medina's curator insight, April 11, 2014 1:07 PM

This article is mainly about the  mobile side of things in the Music Industry. Information on how more and more people are illegally downloading music and or streaming music. This may seem like an everyday thing to most, but in the Music Industry, it is killing the system.

Chris Grissom's curator insight, April 23, 11:08 PM

my insight: roy grissom 

Major services for downloading and streaming music have proliferated and are now available in more than 100 markets, while subscribers to online music services increased 44 percent to an estimated 20 million in 2012, the group said. The European digital market grew faster than average at about 20 percent in 2012, the IFPI said.

Still, the industry has a problem with unlicensed music services using tracks without permission. To halt such sites, Internet service providers, search engines and advertisers need to cooperate, the IFPI said.

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iTunes Market Share Still Dominant After a Decade (Research)

iTunes Market Share Still Dominant After a Decade (Research) | Music Industry Hot Topics | Scoop.it
After nearly a decade since selling its first digital song, Apple Inc.'s iTunes continues to dominate with a 63% unit share of the U.S.
Gustavo Garcia's insight:

It is important to know that itunes is number one on the market for anybody in the music industry, to use it as a medium to distribute material and reach the most people possible with your work and make a living from it.

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Chris Grissom's curator insight, April 23, 11:48 PM

After nearly a decade since selling its first digital song, Apple Inc.'s iTunes continues to dominate with a 63% unit share of the U.S. market for digital music downloads in the fourth quarter, according to estimates released Tuesday by the NPD Group Inc.