Industrialization and Development
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Industrialization and Development
Economic and political influences of countries
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Wealth Inequality in America

Wealth Inequality in America | Industrialization and Development | Scoop.it
Infographics on the distribution of wealth in America, highlighting both the inequality and the difference between our perception of inequality and the actua... Seth Dixon, Ph.D.'s insight: This vi...
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Why Can’t We End Poverty in America?

Why Can’t We End Poverty in America? | Industrialization and Development | Scoop.it
After years of effort and money, 46 million Americans are poor. Hope nonetheless remains.
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A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S.

A Look into the Causes of Poverty in the U.S. | Industrialization and Development | Scoop.it
"Are more and more people in the western world dropping off the radar and becoming the invisible poor or is the opposite happening?  We recently heard that an astounding 46 million Americans are of...
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The State of Women in the World [Infographic]

The State of Women in the World [Infographic] | Industrialization and Development | Scoop.it
Today, we celebrate International Women's Day. Every day, women around the world are making a significant impact on our homes, schools and communities. But gender inequity is preventing women from ...
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Song: European Union

Song: European Union | Industrialization and Development | Scoop.it

"Germany and France spent decades at each others' throats. Now, bound by a common currency, they're working together to save the euro zone. It's a story that's begging for a musical number — which, as it happens, we have right here."


Via Seth Dixon
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:21 AM

Yet, they are both singing in the English man language, like wanted to be heard by glorious England. The European Union is strong, but at the same time fragile. It feel it can break by any politic different.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 6:03 PM

Looking at European history as a whole this recent unity between nations, especially Germany and France is an incredibly new and unusual concept. For centuries European countries have been at one another's throats only in the late 20th century has this changed. While this idea of a musical is humors it shows that because of globalization and economics these nations have bounded together and now are heavily reliant upon one another.   

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 1:04 PM

Its humorous how after years of being in conflict with one another, this song manages to highlight the ways in which France and Germany, along with other European countries have manged to over their differences. Along in this song highlights the things in which these countries are known for demonstrates the pure genius in all of this.

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WomanStats Maps

WomanStats Maps | Industrialization and Development | Scoop.it
"The WomanStats Project is the most comprehensive compilation of information on the status of women in the world. The Project facilitates understanding the linkage between the situation of women an...
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Tea-plucking machines threaten Assam livelihoods

Tea-plucking machines threaten Assam livelihoods | Industrialization and Development | Scoop.it
Tea plucking machines are threatening the livelihoods of tea pickers in the Indian state of Assam, reports Mark Tully.
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Human Development Index (HDI)

Human Development Index (HDI) | Industrialization and Development | Scoop.it
This map shows Human Development Index (HDI) for 169 countries in the World. Update for 2011 What is Human Development Index?
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GDP vs GNP - Difference and Comparison | Diffen

What's the difference between GDP and GNP? GDP (or Gross Domestic Product) and GNP (Gross National Product) both measure the size and strength of the economy but their definition, calculation and applications are different from each other.
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UNICEF - Definitions

The United Nations Children's Fund - UNICEF - works for children's rights, their survival, development and protection, guided by the Convention on the Rights of the Child.
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What we can learn from Mexico

What we can learn from Mexico | Industrialization and Development | Scoop.it

Earlier this month, the president told a newspaper the solution to partisanship is politics and more politics.


Via Seth Dixon
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Kendra King's curator insight, February 2, 2015 8:37 PM

The title of this article was what enticed me as I was hoping to find an actual answer. However, based on this article alone, I don’t actually think there is much the United States can learn from Mexico about politics or economics.

 

This author failed to mention that a difference in political systems could also attribute to the new Mexican leader’s ability to obtain “endorsements from across the spectrum.”  Mexico recently had an election. The new President this article is praising is part of a party that controlled the land for 70+ years until Nieto's predecessor. His predecessor messed up with the cartels so badly that Nieto was elected back into office. Given the amount of support Nieto had going into office, it doesn't seem so challenging to negotiate with opposing parties. Plus, I doubt the opposing parts are as unreasonable as some of the United States members of congress, like the Tea Party.   

 

I also see little to glean from the manufacturing route that Mexico is on at the moment. I will admit that the projected GDP growth of 4% mentioned in the article is impressive. However, thinking that the key to economic growth in the United States is through a similar “manufacturing boom” is just out of touch with the times. As stated in class our wages can’t keep up with the cheaper wages of developing countries (a point the author eluded to in the section discussing “the three main factors at play,” factor number three). Thus, doing what Mexico is doing doesn’t fit the American economy. What the United States might try doing is finding a manufacturing niche that no one has a market on in order to obtain more jobs. Maybe something higher end or medically related would be of benefit to the United States. Even these jobs would end up comprising a small part of the United States economy because the United States is more of a white collar economy. As such, more should be done to protect that sector of our economy from things like outsourcing given its relevance to our modern economy.

 

 Overall, I think the media’s quick comparisons of other countries falls under the bad category of globalization. A fair amount of people would just use this article to say things like, if Mexico’s leader can do X Y & Z then so should Obama. Yet, many of those people wouldn’t actually think about all the differences or reasons why Obama can’t compromise or revert the economy backwards. Am I saying Obama shouldn’t try more or that I am happy with the lack of compromise by all, no. However, I think it is dangerous for journalist to gloss over the situation since many people will take them as a credible source to cite. Mind you not all journalism is bad though. The Scoop.It article I read this week regarding Walmart is a great example of how investigative journalism can have positive consequences. The major difference being one actually did their homework that cited concrete specifics, while the other made a flimsy analogy.  

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 22, 2015 7:44 AM

While our government is perpetually mired in gridlock, the Mexican government is making lasting reforms to their nation. News attention on Mexico is almost always negative. While the violence and the drug trade are serious issues,  not enough attention is being devoted to the rapid growth of the Mexican economy. Politicians in Mexico are coming together to create an environment for positive economic growth. The article describes three factors that are leading to the growth of the Mexican economy. The first factor is Mexico's geographic location. Being located right next door to the United States is an enormous advantage for Mexico. Industrial goods are easily and cheaply being transported across the border. The second factor is the ever controversial NAFTA. The agreement ratified during the Clinton Administration allows for Mexican goods to be sold at lower rates than their Asian counterparts. The final factor is wages. The cheap labor environment has made the nation a manufacturing hub. So what can the United States learn from Mexico? Many of their economic advantages are not applicable to our country. However, we can look to Mexico for an example of functioning government. It well past time that our political parties come together and actually try to govern our nation.

Kevin Nguyen's curator insight, October 7, 2015 1:47 PM

Wow, what an interesting article about the direction Mexico is taking off on. Their GDP is increasing and the worker's wages are surprising better than Chinese workers. Both are huge exports of good and as a younger country than China, Mexico is on it's way to manufacture and economic boom. As neighbor country to Mexico, I am curious to see the actions U.S will take to learn and mirror Mexico's growth.

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Which Countries Don’t Have a Minimum Wage?

Which Countries Don’t Have a Minimum Wage? | Industrialization and Development | Scoop.it
In a surprising move, President Obama proposed during the State of the Union address to increasing the federal minimum wage to $9 an hour.
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Crisis Guide: Iran

Crisis Guide: Iran | Industrialization and Development | Scoop.it
Iran poses steep challenges to its Middle East neighbors and the world. Explore the country's
complex regime structure and controversial nuclear program, and watch experts debate the range
of policy options.
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The California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis

The California-Mexico Border: Dreams of a Transnational Metropolis | Industrialization and Development | Scoop.it
  "A basic truth about the cultural geography of the California border [is this]—two very different city-building traditions come crashing into each other at one of the most contentious intern...
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Industrialization & Economic Development

Industrialization & Economic Development | Industrialization and Development | Scoop.it
Wealth Inequality in America: great visualization of the data!
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