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8 Best Coding Games For Kids

8 Best Coding Games For Kids | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
Help children become active rather than passive users of technology with these exciting coding games for kids. It’s much easier to teach kids programming when you offer them games that are interactive, entertaining and educational. Kids love playing games, so game based learning is a natural evolution and a perfect environment for coding games. Coding doesn’t have to be hard and boring, it can be fun if taught in the right way. Kids are growing up surrounded by technology so learning to program will be an essential part of their educational agenda and open up many opportunities for jobs in the future. Have a look at these eight best learn to code games for kids and choose the one your kid will love the most.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, August 24, 6:14 PM

Good stuff! Thanks to John Evans.

Lee Hall's curator insight, August 25, 9:01 AM
Have fun with your children or students and learn something about coding yourself. 
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32 Research-Based Instructional Strategies -

32 Research-Based Instructional Strategies - | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
You want to teach with what’s been proven to work. That makes sense.

In the ‘data era’ of education that’s mean research-based instructional strategies to drive data-based teaching, and while there’s a lot to consider here we’d love to explore more deeply, for now we’re just going to take a look at the instructional strategies themselves.

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Marta Torán's curator insight, August 22, 1:54 PM
Una lista de estrategias para el diseño intruccional basadas en la investigación.
Gloria Huerta's curator insight, August 23, 12:12 AM
Estrategias para aprendizaje basado en la investigación, contiene links para ampliar algunas de ellas.
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7 Important Questions Before Implementing Digital Portfolios

7 Important Questions Before Implementing Digital Portfolios | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
Digital portfolios are something that are really starting to take off in schools. There are different software programs that will make “portfolios” easy to share, yet do we truly embrace the power that a digital portfolio can bring into our schools? Since it is “digital”, we need to go beyond a portfolio that only represents one year of learning, but can show the progression over time.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 18, 1:08 AM

Some interesting thoughts on portfolios

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, August 20, 5:19 AM
Quelques bonnes questions à se poser en cas d'utilisation d'un portofolio numérique.
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5 Ways Teachers Can Encourage Deeper Learning With Personal Devices (EdSurge News)

5 Ways Teachers Can Encourage Deeper Learning With Personal Devices (EdSurge News) | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
To ban or not to ban, that is always the question when it comes to personal devices in the classroom. But rather than fight this uphill battle (Generation Alpha is forecasted to be more technological than any previous), let's figure out how to leverage these little machines. If used intentionally, m

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Should we focus on teaching or learning?

Should we focus on teaching or learning? | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
"Inquiry happens when you focus on the art of teaching." Kath Murdoch. This is an interesting moment in Kath's conversation with teachers. I lose focus on my note-taking as I pursue this thought... I tend to say 'focus less on teaching and more on learning', and here is Kath Murdoch, inquiry guru, expressing what, on the face of it,…

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How to Use Narrated Presentations With Voice Overs in the Classroom

How to Use Narrated Presentations With Voice Overs in the Classroom | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
Examples of ways students can use Visme's audio feature to create narrated, self-running presentations with voice overs.

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Rachael Bryant's curator insight, August 16, 10:33 PM
digital storytelling potential
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8 Great Learn To Code Toy Robots For Kids @avatargeneration

8 Great Learn To Code Toy Robots For Kids @avatargeneration | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
Learn to code robots are a fun way to teach kids the fundamentals of programming. Nowadays, there is a growing understanding that knowing how to program is essential for our kids. While learning random facts is less and less relevant in a world where you can simply use Google to find an answer to any question, programming becomes an important skill that enables anyone to succeed. However, you can’t simply give a book to your kids and expect that they will learn everything by themselves. Instead, teach kids programming with smart and fun toy coding robots for kids that can transform the tedious learning process into an exciting game.

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18 must-try apps for the new academic year.

18 must-try apps for the new academic year. | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
I am currently on the last day of my summer holiday and have started thinking about new technology I can use in the upcoming year.  I have found 18 apps / websites that  I am definitely going to try. 1) Evernote. I am looking forward to exploring this free app / website in lessons.  It is…

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Maggie Rouman's curator insight, August 16, 9:50 AM

With the new academic year beginning, why not incorporate some new web tools or apps into your online or blended classroom settings? Take a look. There's something for everyone here!

Lee Hall's curator insight, August 17, 9:22 AM
Animoto is one of my favorite apps for student presentations. 
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Teaching with Graphic Novels 

Teaching with Graphic Novels  | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
Modern graphic novels have emerged as effective teaching tools that help improve literacy, explain complex concepts, and get students excited about reading.

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HCL's curator insight, August 14, 7:07 PM
Graphic novels can provide students with a number of reading benefits because of their unique style and presentation... they can improve literacy, explain complex concepts, and get students excited about reading.
Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, August 15, 2:29 AM

"Visual Storytelling Can Build Non-Visual Reading Skills


Although often grouped together, a graphic novel is not the same as a comic book. Unlike the Sunday comic stripes or short serialized superhero stories, graphic novels contain all of the aspects of any school-assigned book: a beginning, a middle, an end, conflict, character development, resolution, and many other literary characteristics. However, graphic novels often use panels and images to also tell the story.

“The most significant difference from a comic is that the graphic novel’s text is both written and visual,” English teacher Cat Turner explained to the National Council of Teachers of English. “Every part of each frame plays a role in the interpretation of the text, and hence, graphic novels actually demand sophisticated readers.”

 

This more diverse and complex style of storytelling may be especially beneficial to students who struggle with large sections of text. The combinations of short lines of text and images throughout may deliver the same information to a student as a lengthy paragraph, but feel more palatable.

 

Due to space limitations in a panel on on the page, graphic novels also showcase efficient writing, mirroring a habit that readers can practice themselves. The unique combination of image and text can also improve comprehension and even vocabulary, as students have more context to derive their clues from. The School Library Journal noted one example of graphic novels in the classroom where an educator gave half the class Hamlet as the traditional text and the rest the graphic novelization. Those who read the graphic novel spent almost one fewer hour reading and scored higher on a comprehension quiz later.

 

Some educators argue that reading through images can be just as important as learning to read through text, particularly with the proliferation of visual media. Graphic novels also provide nontraditional learners an opportunity to get excited about reading and thrive via the mixed medium.

 

“Graphic novels can be a way in for students who are difficult to reach through traditional texts,” educational publisher Scholastic explained. “Even those deemed poor readers willingly and enthusiastically gravitate toward these books. Readers who are not interested in reading or who, despite being capable of reading, prefer gaming or watching media, can be pulled into a story by the visual elements of graphic novels.”

 

When Graphic Novels Are Too Graphic
One of the major criticism over graphic novels is the depiction of violent, graphic, racy, or scandalous images. Some of the most famous graphic novels, such as the Watchmen and Persepolis, feature scenes or stories of serious violence.

 

However, advocates of graphic novels argue that the issue is often not with the content but the presentation. As SLJ noted, the problem may be what researcher Steven Cary calls the “naked buns” effect. This is a paradox where the text of the phrase “naked buns” is not perceived as offensive or indecent while the illustration of the phrase would be. It is the image not the concept that can lead to controversy.

 

In the past, the graphic memoir Fun Home has faced controversy when it was assigned as reading for college students due to its depiction of sex. Fellow autobiographical graphic novel Persepolis has also been protested when assigned to middle school students because of a scene involving torture. Following the “naked buns” argument, this content may only be seen as more offensive than traditional novels because of its illustration of the concepts versus its discussion of them.

However, many books that have been banned or censored throughout history in U.S. are now looked at as literary masterpieces and assigned regularly, such as The Canterbury Tales , The Grapes of Wrath , and the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn .

 

 

Ways to Begin Integrating Comics Into Curriculum
Graphic novels can provide students with a number of reading benefits because of their unique style and presentation, but this also makes it more difficult for educators to incorporate these works into their curriculum.

 

Shelley Hong Xu, associate professor in the department of teacher education at California State University, Long Beach, recommended that teachers start slow and learn more about graphic novels in general, according to the NCTE. Xu advocates for educators to spend time reading a graphic novel and noting their own comprehension skills.

 

“I think that every preservice and inservice teacher needs to experience this activity in order to better understand literacy knowledge and skills that students use with reading comics and graphic novels,” Xu said.

 

Teachers should also learn about the genre of graphic novels and what their students are most interested in learning or what their experience with the genre is. There are a number of graphic novels that are directly focused on historic events and may act as teaching tools on their own, but there are many others that would be meritless in the classroom.

 

Teachers who want to incorporate graphic novels into the curriculum should also expect some pushback from parents and administrators, Xu argued. Educators should explain how these texts can help students reach their education goals, improve reading comprehension, and provide other benefits. Students may be less likely to push back about the inclusion of graphic novels in class, but educators should be prepared to coach students on how to read graphic novels and deal with other difficulties that may arise.

 

Although graphic novels are unlikely to cure modern reading issues in the classroom, their unique style of storytelling and more exciting visual medium can help address specific pain points by attracting a wider variety of readers, leading to more consistent recreational reading and creating healthy reading habits."

Tina Jameson's curator insight, August 18, 7:08 PM
An interesting assessment of the effectiveness of using and analyzing graphic novels in the classroom, and of the controversial nature of the material that may also face educators.  However the writer of the article clearly sees the value of using graphic novels as a teaching tool.
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Lisa Nielsen: The Innovative Educator: What's Your Classroom Inviting Students to Do? 4 Configurations to Consider.

Lisa Nielsen: The Innovative Educator: What's Your Classroom Inviting Students to Do? 4 Configurations to Consider. | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
Regardless of the furniture you have, innovative educators must always consider how to give students the ability to determine how and where they learn best. This means a smart and intentional use of space, not just in the classroom, but also, perhaps in non-traditional spaces such as hallways.  Yes hallways.  Interested in that, read this about my learning in the halls and this from how my best friend learned in our high school halls, and this eye-opening piece about learning spaces from Chris Lehmann.


While high-end furniture is a nice-to-have, it’s not a need-to-have. As a new teacher in Harlem in the 90s I begged for donations, scoured Craigslist, and brought in volunteers and students to work on creating a comfortable and cozy environment that gave my students a variety of learning environment options.  Offering students a range of settings and the choice and control enables them to  select the best environment for their learning needs and a sense of ownership over their learning. What do you think? How have or might you use your space to best meet the needs of your students?

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educationandbehavior.com

educationandbehavior.com | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
Free academic, behavior, and social-emotional support for children with and without special needs.
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The 8 Digital Productivity Tools Everyone Should Adopt

The 8 Digital Productivity Tools Everyone Should Adopt | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it

These eight technologies are at the top of the list: they’re the sites, programs and features I wish every computer user would start usingtoday. Every single one of them is available in a free version, though you may well find yourself paying for premium features once you discover how useful they are.


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Maggie Rouman's curator insight, August 6, 1:41 PM

Whether you're an online /blended teacher, trainer or student, these are great tools to make your life a lttile easier.

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Flipping Large Classes: Three Strategies to Engage Students

Flipping Large Classes: Three Strategies to Engage Students | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
As we continue our ongoing series focused on the flipped classroom in higher education, it’s time to tackle another frequently asked question: “How can I flip a large class?”

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Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, August 22, 4:45 PM

These strategies work in a large lecture hall or in a traditional small classroom. Take a look!

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5 Ways Teachers Can Encourage Deeper Learning With Personal Devices (EdSurge News)

5 Ways Teachers Can Encourage Deeper Learning With Personal Devices (EdSurge News) | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
To ban or not to ban, that is always the question when it comes to personal devices in the classroom.
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Nik Peachey's Educational Technology Newsletter - August 18th 2016

Nik Peachey's Educational Technology Newsletter - August 18th 2016 | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
In this newsletter I have links to 7 new educational tools and 7 of the most interesting learning and tech related articles and ebooks.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 19, 3:01 AM

My latest free edtech newsletter.

Rosemary Tyrrell, Ed.D.'s curator insight, August 19, 2:24 PM
Always worth checking out. 
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Playing Is More Than Fun—It's Smart

Playing Is More Than Fun—It's Smart | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
Children who pretend, and grown-ups who immerse themselves in the imaginary realms of fiction and drama, are considering what would happen if the world were different, and working out the consequences. My former student Daphna Buchsbaum, now at the University of Toronto, and I, along with several colleagues, found that preschoolers who pretended more were better at “counterfactual” reasoning–figuring out what could have happened, but didn’t.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 19, 2:52 AM

Really interesting article with strong links to learning.

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14 Catapults for Kids to Create and Experiment With - Fun-A-Day!

14 Catapults for Kids to Create and Experiment With - Fun-A-Day! | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
In addition to being an exciting experience, catapults lead to so much thinking and learning! Fine motor skills, science, and math are just a few subjects that catapults help children learn about. Have you and your kiddos ever made one, or played with one? If not, here are 14 FUN ideas to try!

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, August 14, 5:52 PM

Looks like fun! Thanks to John Evans.

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44 QR Codes Resources For Teaching & Learning

44 QR Codes Resources For Teaching & Learning | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
While the potential is great, in short a QR Code is a physical link that can be scanned by smartphones or tablets in mobile learning circumstances. The following list from listly user Marianna Talei offers a huge variety of QR resources, from QR code generators to attaching images and hosting QR code treasure hunts.

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18 must-try apps for the new academic year.

18 must-try apps for the new academic year. | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
I am currently on the last day of my summer holiday and have started thinking about new technology I can use in the upcoming year.  I have found 18 apps / websites that  I am definitely going to try. 1) Evernote. I am looking forward to exploring this free app / website in lessons.  It is…

Via Maggie Rouman
more...
Maggie Rouman's curator insight, August 16, 9:50 AM

With the new academic year beginning, why not incorporate some new web tools or apps into your online or blended classroom settings? Take a look. There's something for everyone here!

Lee Hall's curator insight, August 17, 9:22 AM
Animoto is one of my favorite apps for student presentations. 
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Welcome to Locly

Welcome to Locly | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
Locly is being used across the world to let students explore the spaces around them and discover digital content with their iPads.

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Nik Peachey's curator insight, August 18, 1:19 AM

Interesting application for creating situated learning using augmented reality.

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Flexible Seating and Student-Centered Classroom Redesign

Flexible Seating and Student-Centered Classroom Redesign | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
Flexible classroom seating invites collaboration, communication, creativity, and critical thinking by helping students manage their physical energy and comfort as they learn on their own terms.

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These are the four stages of your brain on maths

These are the four stages of your brain on maths | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
Ever wondered how your mind deals with complex sums and multiplications?

A new study has imaged how the brain's activity levels change while taking on serious maths problems, and reveals for the first time that there are four distinct neural stages involved in coming up with a solution.

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10 Great Books if You Have a Sibling with Special Needs

10 Great Books if You Have a Sibling with Special Needs | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it
10 Great Books if You Have a Sibling with Special Needs | Here are our top picks if you have a brother or sister who is special needs.
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What Do Great Makerspaces Have in Common? — Medium @lflemingedu

What Do Great Makerspaces Have in Common? — Medium @lflemingedu | Individual and Special Needs Examiner | Scoop.it

Since creating my makerspace and more recently, since publishing my book on makerspaces, I have had the honor of having conversations with, as well as working with, people all across the world. One of the most important lessons I have learned is that….


No two school makerspaces should ever be exactly alike, because no two school communities are ever exactly alike.


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