Indigenous languages of South Africa
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THICK END OF THE WEDGE: More complex than it seems - BDlive

THICK END OF THE WEDGE: More complex than it seems - BDlive | Indigenous languages of South Africa | Scoop.it
THICK END OF THE WEDGE: More complex than it seems
BDlive
Indigenous languages should long ago have been made compulsory at schools. By now, the pictures of Nigella Lawson and her husband will be on YouTube or on the web.
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News - Trilingual terminology lists contribute to...

News - Trilingual terminology lists contribute to... | Indigenous languages of South Africa | Scoop.it

It is extremely satisfying when students say they understand the content of prescribed books thanks to a terminology list in their mother tongue, says Ms Anita Jonker, co-ordinator of the First-year Academy in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.

Thanks to her initiative, close on 1 000 political terms are now available in English, Afrikaans and isiXhosa.

"While I was presenting an introductory module on Political Science to students in the extended degree programme, I realised that they understood the work much better if the technical terms were translated into their mother tongue," says Jonker. "These students often arrive at the university with academic backlogs."

The seed was planted and she applied for FIRLT funding to have the terminology lists of two of the prescribed books in the Department of Political Science (Heywood, Andrew, 2007. Politics and MacGowan, Cornelissen and Nel, 2007. Power, Wealth and Global Equity) translated into Afrikaans and isiXhosa by professional translators, as well as edited. The result is 488 new translations of the English Heywood terminology list and 496 new translations of the English McGowan et al. terminology list.

"The terminology lists help students to enjoy the course more, and this increases participation in the lecture hall," says Jonker. "When they understand the technical concepts better, their self-confidence grows."

Just how much the terminology lists help the students is reflected in the reactions of two students.

"One of the Afrikaans-speaking students said everything suddenly makes sense, while an isiXhosa speaker said that although he had received his entire school education in English, the translations into his mother tongue made it possible to understand the concepts in the textbook even better," says Jonker.

Research is currently being done on the use of the two trilingual terminology lists as instruments to determine whether they can have an influence on the academic success of EDP students with Political Science as a major.

 


Via Charles Tiayon
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Culture via language - Bizcommunity.com

Culture via language - Bizcommunity.com | Indigenous languages of South Africa | Scoop.it
Culture via language
Bizcommunity.com
Therefore, if you live in Eastern Cape for example, there is no reason why you shouldn't know how to communicate in Xhosa; if you're from Free State you should know Sesotho, etc.
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