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Spark Camera, a simple movie-making app

Spark Camera, a simple movie-making app | Indie Filmmaking | Scoop.it
iPhone video tends toward brevity--think Vine and Instagram--and fancier movie apps are thin on the ground. Spark Camera, from IDEO, aims to make it easier to shoot atmospheric, attractive mini-movies with a smartphone.
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Indie Filmmaking
Independent Filmmaking news, stories, and links about and for filmmakers. With a techie angle.
Curated by Jeremy Wilker
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These Knobs and Sliders Turn an iPad Into a Custom Tactile Interface

These Knobs and Sliders Turn an iPad Into a Custom Tactile Interface | Indie Filmmaking | Scoop.it
There's a good reason why so many of us still prefer mechanical keyboards and real control boards despite the availability of touchscreen interfaces: In many cases, they give us more control over our digital worlds. Fans of tactile interfaces will love this project by Florian Born--who created a system that meshes your iPad with arrangeable physical controls.
Jeremy Wilker's insight:

daaaaaaaang this is pretty impressive. imagine mixing your video/audio/color with these tools on your ipad!

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Canon C100 internal AVCHD vs. external ProRes compared

Canon C100 internal AVCHD vs. external ProRes compared | Indie Filmmaking | Scoop.it
External hard disk recorders offer an easy way to record high quality easy to edit codecs. Here we compare internal AVCHD to external ProRes
Jeremy Wilker's insight:

internal recording is great in most cases. when you need to manipulate your footage in post (color grading, correction, retouching, masking, compositing) then  you will want the higher bitrate data

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Canon Cinema EOS C100 Mark II

Canon Cinema EOS C100 Mark II | Indie Filmmaking | Scoop.it
Canon will be releasing an updated version of the C300, the Canon EOS C100 Mark II in December 2014.
Jeremy Wilker's insight:

there is no "new 40% slow motion" mode, is there? I mean, recording at 60 fps and playing back at 24 fps gives you 40% of speed, no?

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Film Festival Group Pleads With Academy: Don't Cut Our Grants

Film Festival Group Pleads With Academy: Don't Cut Our Grants | Indie Filmmaking | Scoop.it
IFP Festival Forum asks Academy to reconsider its freeze on grant programs that fund almost two dozen festivals
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Mike Matzdorff, evil text in Motion and matching voice in FCPX

Mike Matzdorff, evil text in Motion and matching voice in FCPX | Indie Filmmaking | Scoop.it
It's a Tuesday, so its time for a roundup of the set of tutorials from Ripple Training. No Steve in this week's Macbreak Studio, Mike Matzdorff is the guest.
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Locking fonts in FCPX and some seasonal Halloween tutorials

Locking fonts in FCPX and some seasonal Halloween tutorials | Indie Filmmaking | Scoop.it
It's a Tuesday which means a roundup of Ripple's tutorial threesome. We have the weekly MacBreak Studio on locking fonts and a couple of seasonal spooky tutorials!
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Koji - the cross platform 35mm accurate film colour plugins from Crumplepop and Dale Grahn

Koji - the cross platform 35mm accurate film colour plugins from Crumplepop and Dale Grahn | Indie Filmmaking | Scoop.it
Crumplepop has teamed up with film industry veteran Dale Grahn to produce a range of cross-platform plugins that produce highly accurate 35mm film colour emulation. They are called Koji.
Jeremy Wilker's insight:

good stuff from CrumplePop once again.

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Developing Key Art as your film enters the festival circuit

Developing Key Art as your film enters the festival circuit | Indie Filmmaking | Scoop.it

How much to spend on developing key art, and when to spend that money, is one of the many important decisions a filmmaker has to make. Yet like many aspects of the filmmaking process, there is no one-size-fits-all standard. When we were discussing the prospect of my writing this post, one of my colleagues at TFC remarked that for a film that costs, say, $250K to make, a $10-20K or more spend on developing key art (and mind you, this is separate from a marketing budget where you have to pay to get that key art out into the world, and separate still from designing and maintaining a web site) is not unreasonable, assuming one wanted to hire a top agency. Other filmmakers get someone they know to do it for free, if for no other reason than they are out of funds. Most micro-budget indie filmmakers will undoubtedly fall in between these two polar extremes in terms of what they will end up paying, but in the end, what you produce, and when you produce it, is a decision that should not be rushed or taken lightly.

Most filmmakers would agree that good key art is essential…it can be the factor that decides whether somebody will click further to watch your trailer, or move on to another film. If it is carried over to your website effectively, it should inspire confidence in your brand. Good key art can endure and even come to possess an iconic existence of its own that will represent with your film for years or even decades to come.

But good key alone is probably not going to work miracles.

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Every Frame a Painting

Every Frame a Painting | Indie Filmmaking | Scoop.it

In drama, two characters walk into a room. Each wants something from the other. The question of the scene is: who gets what they want?

Jeremy Wilker's insight:

very cool stuff here... spend some time

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