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Book Review | 'Kamra' Ed. by Munem Wasif & Tanzim Wahab

Book Review | 'Kamra' Ed. by Munem Wasif & Tanzim Wahab | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

'Photography in Rearview'

 

"Art is constantly evolving. It travels through time, space, medium and perceptions, constantly contradicting and breaking boundaries. Photography, a relatively recent art form for both ends of the world now stands as a prime witness to time and has combined the old and new to create its own language, different from those we quintessentially experience on a canvas. While the globalized West is institutionalizing progressive photography, the phenomenon has more recently reached its hype in Bangladesh. Courtesy of international trade, China, new media and peer pressure, equipments are widely available and a ‘photographer’ is found at every nook and corner.

 

Exciting times as such is frequently described as desperate times. Because of its prevalence, photography – like any other creative outlet – faces the same doubt, the same criticism of being overestimated. And it is perhaps because of this very overestimation that triggered photographers Munem Wasif and Tanzim Wahab to take a step back and re-explore the origin of photography in the East and West. A compilation of articles, interviews, commentaries and profiles, Kamra is a much needed conversation on how the art form has evolved over time and found its niche in Bangladesh..."

 

Article by Sabhanaz Rashid Diya | Daily Star Weekend Magazine

Also discover the book on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h23vxssI5Mo

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Exhibition in Paris | deFacebook by Nandan Ghiya at Paris-Beijing Gallery

Exhibition in Paris | deFacebook by Nandan Ghiya at Paris-Beijing Gallery | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Artist's Note

 

"The project deFacebook employs a number of old/vintage portrait photographs of different sizes from various parts of Rajasthan. Each portrait has been painted with square blocks to pixelate the faces. deFacebook comments on the interaction of internet/digital technology & its effects on indigenous cultures & individual identities. All individual or cultural value systems are defined by various physical factors ranging from ethnography, geography or economy. However, the advent of the digital has relocated everything on a virtual space. I grew up to a family of traditional art dealers in Jaipur, the 400 years old capital of Rajasthan. We had such old pictures hanging on our ancestral house walls. These were images of ancestors, gurus or political heroes. These had different associations for different people. Everyone connected with them at one level or another.

 

Now, connectivity has an altogether new meaning. Megapixel camera phones and LED screens are the new spaces for any form of interaction. Everything is becoming wallpaper on a digital screen. So my personal shrine is nothing more than a combination of thousands of pixels. The nearest market place is e-bay. The nearest hang out joint is Facebook. On www.facebook.com, it says Facebook helps you connect and share with the people in your life. The statement represents a huge irony. How can one possibly connect on a flat screen? The answers are online communities, social networking sites, virtual farms, e-books, and virtual identities….

 

Furthermore, we are fed an endless array of imagery and information everywhere constantly. There are advertisements, agendas, deals, offers, etc. One should ideally feel lost & disillusioned. But we do not. We guilelessly hogged everything instead. In the Virtual, there is no accountability or burdens associated with individual identity. No more Indians or Americans, capitalists or fanatics - Just combinations of a few pixels here and there. Everyone and everything is gradually losing its face- hence, the pixilation of all the portraits in my installation. Virtual is the New Real. Pixel is the new Atom. Five senses are passé, 1920 x 1080 is the new way to be.

 

Welcome to deFacebook- the new chapter of human evolution."

 

Photograph and Text by Nandan Ghiya

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Book Review | 'A Family Portrait', Akshay Mahajan on Kushal Ray's photo novel 'Intimacies'

Book Review | 'A Family Portrait', Akshay Mahajan on Kushal Ray's photo novel 'Intimacies' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

'Young wavering photojournalists, such as myself, often go in search of pictures with a sometimes wanton thirst. They move cities, living their days out of cheap bus-stand lodges or friends’ apartments, and nights drinking outside cheap bars on Church Street. Anything that provokes a narrative. They probably think that like Nan Goldin, they’ll make pictures representing the transgressions of young urban dwellers. Faltering, perhaps they’ll meet a young queer poet and dance writer and find a subject. Over the next six months — furtive conversations over cheap whiskey at watering holes, words punctuated by drags of cigarettes and post-ganja confessions in bedrooms — they will take pictures of their friends, teasing out nuggets of a story. Rolls of film fed by curiosity. As Goldin put it, “It’s the form of photography that is most defined by love. People… take them to remember people”. This love is born out of a long-standing relationship between the observer and the subject.

 

On the face of it, Kushal Ray’s Intimacies is a series that could be seen as a representation of domestic decline, even a “human catastrophe”. Critiques of Ray’s photographs as an episodic representation of the decline in Kolkata’s middle class, the 12-room, family home of the Chatterjees, seem to encapsulate the slow withering of a joint family. They see Ray’s interiors as a metaphor for the politics that aims to unmask the accident of poverty. Perhaps, even a representation of his working class family’s poverty and violence; stages of personal degradation and suffering...'

 

Text by Akshay Mahajan | Tehelka
 

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Photography Quaterly PIX : upcoming issue on 'Freedom'

Photography Quaterly PIX : upcoming issue on 'Freedom' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"PIX is not a quarterly that rides solely on the photographs featured in the issues. (...) For every issue we juxtapose the photographers' bodies of work with a writer that we think would be able to best respond to those images. (...)

This process of combining practitioners from these two worlds sometimes leads to unexpectedly successful collaborations, for example, Indrajit Hazra's piece in the upcoming issue of PIX, speaking about Andrea Fernandes' series “Killing Kittens”. Hazra responded to the works instantaneously, providing a perspective that I feel completes the piece in a way. Incorporating text into the magazine gives it a new breathing space. (...) Photography, much like writing, is a kind of language. The images provoke some sort of feeling when one looks at them; they speak to you in some way. The writer takes that feeling and runs with it, and this is where the dialogue begins."

 

Tanvi Mishra | Interview for ArtInfo.com

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PhotoBook | Posing For Posterity : Royal Indian Portraits

PhotoBook | Posing For Posterity : Royal Indian Portraits | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

How to Strike a Royal Pose ? Rule number one: never smile. A new book brings together a collection of portraits of India's erstwhile princely rulers taken by some of the country's earliest photographers. Here's a selection of them.

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Portfolio | 'Tat Tvam Asi' by Jérôme Thirriot

Portfolio | 'Tat Tvam Asi' by Jérôme Thirriot | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Jérôme Thirriot always returned to India as if it were his adopted family..."

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Exhibition in Delhi | Madan Mahatta’s Photographs Document the Birth of Modern Delhi’s Architecture

Exhibition in Delhi | Madan Mahatta’s Photographs Document the Birth of Modern Delhi’s Architecture | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Every now and then a show comes along that compels us to challenge our conception of the contemporary history of photography in India. In the last few years, since the space for photography has expanded, a range of photo archives have been pulled out from storage and have found a place on gallery walls and collectors' homes. The photography community was most recently reintroduced to the work of photographers like Umrao Sher-Gil, Lala Deen Dayal, Kulwant Roy, Homai Vyarawala, and Richard Bartholomew all of whose legacy has been reinstated thanks to the efforts of family members, curators, and gallerists. The few whose works are yet to be revisited in the form of an exhibition have been kept in public memory by photographer Ram Rahman through his series of talks on “The Forgotten Histories” of Indian photography. Through his presentations, Rahman has been adamantly reminding the photography community about photographers like his architect father Habib Rahman, Sunil Janah, and many others whose contribution to the evolution of Indian photography cannot possibly be ignored. Most of the photographers Rahman alludes to have passed away, but some, like Madan Mahatta are very much around, and yesterday, a show of his work opened at Delhi’s Photoink to much critical acclaim. Curated by Rahman, “Delhi Modern: The Architectural Photographs of Madan Mahatta” showcases about 70 photographs taken by Mahatta from the 50s until the mid-80s, documenting the modern architectural history of post-Independent India..."

Article by Roselyne D'Mello | ArtInfo 

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Exhibition in Delhi | Pondicherry by Sebastian Cortes

Pondicherry is an extended photo essay, which has as its main focus the photographer's perception and visual interpretation of the city of Pondicherry. The photographer journeys into the metaphorical and anthropological folds of the city searching for a sense of "place"- his interpretation of a specific environment and how it's inhabited. The photographer goes beyond the walls and penetrates into the private sphere, into homes, spaces and routines, which exemplify a certain culture or cultures, always searching for visual messages that compose the tapestry of perception, both of the past and of the present. The perception of "place" is also offered in words. The photographer has sought out the participation of several noted French and Indian writers, who have, through the magic of words, offered up very personal and insightful views of Pondicherry - words and images working in a complimentary way for an artistic perception of Pondicherry.

 

Photographs by Sebastian Cortés
http://www.sebastiancortes.com/ ;

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'The Blue Simmer' | Sohrab Hura on Dayanita Singh's work

'The Blue Simmer' | Sohrab Hura on Dayanita Singh's work | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"I can understand now the reluctance on her part for her work to be taken in the context of ‘Indian photography’ and I hope the younger generations of photographers also find in themselves a similar reluctance. Such categories can sometimes become a justification for bad work. While it’s always interesting to look at work in the context of the photographer’s geographical and cultural background, it should be able to stand strong amongst photography from anywhere else. Unlike music, where the instruments can be unique to particular countries, photography’s tool — the camera — is universally the same. We just express a difference in visual language and sensibility. Dayanita’s work has transcended all such categorisation, and in the end it doesn’t really matter where the work comes from — all that matters is that it comes from her. While photographers in India chase after something called ‘contemporary photography’, her’s remains one of the last few honest bodies of work unconscious of any category it’s supposed to fit into..."


Text by Sohrab Hura | Tehelka Magazine

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Exhibition in Mumbai | Rashid Rana: 'Apposite - Opposite'

Exhibition in Mumbai | Rashid Rana: 'Apposite - Opposite' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

On April 9, Rana's show will open across two galleries in Mumbai, Chemould Prescott Road and Chatterjee & Lal, his first exhibition in the city in five years. On display will be a series of works in what is now his trademark style: large photo mosaics made up of scores of tiny, seeming unrelated or contradictory individual images. One of the most provocative examples of this technique is the six-part Veil series, first exhibited at London's prestigious Saatchi Gallery and Chatterjee & Lal in Mumbai in 2007. The work showed an anonymous figure dressed in a burkha, with this larger image made up of tiny, blurred pornographic stills of women, taken from the internet. By juxtaposing the two ideas, Rana critiqued negative stereotypes of women, both the sexual objectification inherent in pornography and the stereotypical image of women from the Islamic world constructed by the media.
 

The paradoxes and duality of a larger image and its constituent smaller images have dominated Rana's artistic practice for the past decade. "Today, every image, idea and truth - whether in ancient mythology or the news of the day - encompasses its opposite within itself. We live in a state of duality," says Rana. "My works are an effort to represent this complexity and transcend the bold divisions that people create in their perceptions."
 

Thus, in Mumbai this month, Rana will exhibit works such as the Language Series, three mosaic landscapes made up of tiny photographs taken by Rana over the past two years of all kinds of text present outdoors in Lahore, such as chalk messages on walls, banners, posters and signboards. "So much of cultural, social and political history is embedded in these texts," says Rana...

Article by Riddhi Doshi | Hindustan Times 

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Porfolio | Bharat Sikka, 'A Matter of Fashion'

Porfolio | Bharat Sikka,  'A Matter of Fashion' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"In his personal work, Bharat Sikka offers a unique brand of fashion photography, a kind of “fashion reporting” where the environment takes center stage and the model must instead adapt to it. Its beauty is one of contrast, between two worlds that join in the sensuality of being."

Images By Bharat Sikka, Article by Séverine Morel on LaLettreDeLaPhotographie

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Tasveer Newsletter | Hikari, Magnum and Still life : forthcoming Exhibitions

Tasveer Newsletter | Hikari, Magnum and Still life : forthcoming Exhibitions | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Tasveer’s current seasons’ exhibitions are now approaching their final destinations around the country. Remaining dates can be seen at the end of this newsletter, and on the Exhibitions pages of the Tasveer website - www.tasveerarts.com. Meanwhile, we're making the final preparations for next seasons' shows. At the beginning of January, we announced three of these - solo shows by Derry Moore, Maimouna Guerresi (image above), and Raghu Rai. In addition to this, we will be staging three group exhibitions; 'Hikari: Contemporary Photography from Japan', 'Still Life' and 'Magnum Ke Tasveer; 50 years in India'.

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Exhibition in Berlin | The Colonial Eye : Early Portrait Photography in India

Exhibition in Berlin | The Colonial Eye : Early Portrait Photography in India | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"One of the world's most comprehensive and significant collections of portrait photography from India is on exhibit for the first time. The collection was originally thought to be lost during World War II, only gradually returning to Berlin's National Museums beginning in the 1990s.
Now, around 300 photographs from the second half of the nineteenth century offer a comprehensive overview of portrait photography from the Indian subcontinent. In addition to pictures by renowned photographers and studios such as Samuel Bourne, Sheperd & Robertson, A.T.W. Penn, and John Burke, works by lesser known artists are also on display. Popular and unexpectedly diverse ethnographic photography of the time stands in contrast to stylised street shots of artisans, as well as portraits of nobility, including Islamic princes and princesses, Maharajas, and clan leaders, taken in their own palaces or in artfully set studio scenes.

One unifying aspect of many early portraits is a particularly European view - "The Colonial Eye". In the second half of the nineteenth century, in the name of science and colonialism, the land and its inhabitants were to be apprehended through observation and cataloguing, analysation and measurement. The fascination with India was especially evoked by the strange-looking indigenous peoples and the caste-system, as well as the splendour of the Indian nobility and the austere life of ascetics."

 

Photograph : Bourne & Shepherd (?), Andamanen-Insulaner, um 1880, Albuminabzug

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Photo Story | "The Bang Bang Club"

Photo Story | "The Bang Bang Club" | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

31,000 women in Punjab have a licence to own guns. Selfdefence is only part of the story. What explains their deep need to be armed and ready?

 

Photos and Article by Garima Jain | Tehelka

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Call for Submissions | Chobi Mela VII - International Festival of Photography in Bangladesh

Call for Submissions | Chobi Mela VII - International Festival of Photography in Bangladesh | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

For its 2013 edition, Chobi Mela's theme is 'fragility' :


"The sweeping gestures of photography have thrived on extremes. Great things, epic moments, the wretched, the vile, the dispossessed, the celebrated and the trodden, have all found themselves facing the lens. Photography has exalted suffering, celebrated the vain. Quiet moments, reflective spirits, the hesitant step, the furtive glance have rarely made headlines. Perceived as being unworthy of the shutter..."

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Mulimedia | 'Dilli Purani Dilli Naye' by Adrian Fisk

Mulimedia | 'Dilli Purani Dilli Naye' by Adrian Fisk | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
These photographs are of a city caught between a dream and a nightmare. The images in Dilli Purani Dilli Naye (Delhi Old / Delhi New), made during 2009 and 2010, are experimental in nature - spur of the moment photographs made with a $200 film camera.

 

Delhi celebrates its 100th anniversary as the capital of India last year. This is a 360 degree view of my life in the Capital, an intimate portrait of my relationship with Delhi, a city going through a period of great change: a mega urban mass that uniquely juxtaposes beauty, opportunity and desire against frustration, darkness and inequality; a capital that trades idioms in fleeting moments, revealing the strange coexistence of those that have and those that do not; a city that is both purani and naye.

 

Adrian Fisk
www.adrianfisk.com

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Exhibition in London | Raqs Media Collective : An Afternoon Unregistered on the Richter Scale (2011)

Exhibition in London | Raqs Media Collective : An Afternoon Unregistered on the Richter Scale (2011) | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Raqs Media Collective are three Delhi-based artists - Jeebesh Bagchi, Monica Narula and Shuddhabrata Sengupta - whose practices include photography, new media, film, media theory and research, criticism and curation.

An Afternoon Unregistered on the Richter Scale (2011) is a silent looped video projection of an archival photograph, subtly altered by the artists to create a dream-like mise-en-scène. The original photograph, taken by James Waterhouse, depicts a room full of surveyors in colonial Calcutta in 1911, and is titled Examining Room of the Duffing Section of the Photographic Department of the Survey of India.

The Collective hope this intervention can ‘conjure a constellation of stars onto a drawing board, induce tremors too gentle to disturb the Richter scale, reveal a dreamed up desert, make time wind backwards, stain the afternoon with indigo and introduce a rustle and a hesitation in the determined stillness of the surveyors hard at work at mapping empire’."

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Exhibition in Delhi | Pushpamala N., The Drama of Three Women

Exhibition in Delhi | Pushpamala N., The Drama of Three Women | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
The series Avega - The Passion, by Indian artist Pushpamala N. is currently on display at the Nature Morte Gallery in New Delhi. The photographic story focuses on three feminine figures of Ramayana, one of the two Indian mythological sagas written in Sanskrit between the 3rd and 2nd centuries BC.
With this new series, the artist continues her reflection about iconographic references in Indian popular culture. Here, she explores the Ramayana, the foundation of Hinduism, known and shared by all in India. Like her previous works, she photographs herself, role playing the three principal heroines of the story.

 

You can read Sybile Girault's complete text in the French version of La Lettre.

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Portfolio | 'Longing' by Prabuddha Dasgupta

Portfolio | 'Longing' by Prabuddha Dasgupta | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Longing is not always oriented toward the future. It can as easily be retrospective. You can long for what you have ­already experienced. Sexual fantasies, for example, are memories (sometimes slightly improved on) as often as they are inventions, albeit memories that are in danger of fading even as they are summoned.
Nor is longing always person- or object-specific. You can be in a state of generalized longing with­out knowing quite what it is that you long for. This might be the purest form of longing, the most dif­ficult to assuage, the least susceptible to being brought to an end, the kind capable of lasting longest—so much so that it can become all but ­indistinguishable from a generalized ­condition of existence..."

Text By Geoff Dyer | The Paris Review 

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CIVIC | An Archive of Indian Visual Culture

CIVIC | An Archive of Indian Visual Culture | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"CIViC is dedicated to the documentation, archiving, and research on a wide-ranging production of popular visual culture in India. While traditional studies of Indian art have remained confined to “ancient”, “medieval” or “colonial” periods and lay stress on historical development of artistic styles or certain aesthetic ideals, popular culture demands a different set of interrogations. The potency of a print lies in its existing in multiples and popular visual culture addresses consequences born from values inherent to its mechanical production such as print capitalism, strategies of representation and identity formation. This strain of cultural studies also produces alternate and subaltern histories; bringing attention to visual histories as non-textual and agency-oriented aspects of knowledge. It is in this event that CIVIC is engaged in a systematic study of popular visual culture as vehicles of representation of difference; differences that pivot around issues of gender, sexuality, race, religion and power. This multidisciplinary centre as such aims to contribute to a better understanding of culture-specific ways of seeing and showing imagery that ranges from religious, gender-specific, political and commercial usage...."

 

Text By Dr. Jyotindra Jain

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'Land of a Thousand Cameras' by Naeem Mohaiemen

'Land of a Thousand Cameras' by Naeem Mohaiemen | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"As per semiotic theory, we make sense of visual phenomena in several ways: resemblance (it looks like what it is), logic (cause and effect), convention (objects that have symbolic value), and signification (the visible signifying something else altogether, although often related). What was intriguing about that "Transition" student photo portfolio was the shift away from the first element: resemblance. Very few images were what they looked like, the meaning was not immediately clear. Even the familiar city had become unmoored from landmarks. It was everywhere and nowhere. This could be the start of something different. Perhaps all this needs to be married to the fever dream embedded within those earlier, bucolic images..."

Text by Naeem Mohaiemen | The Daily Star 

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'Jharia - Apocalypse Now' by Thomas Van Den Driessche

'Jharia - Apocalypse Now' by Thomas Van Den Driessche | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
JHARIA - APOCALYPSE NOW
#84 APOCALYPSE

 

"Ever since I was a child, I have heard that eskimos have dozens of different words to describe subtle nuances of white. When I arrived in Jharia, I couldn’t help wondering the same thing about the inhabitants of the largest mining area in India. Could these people, living litteraly on hell, have developed a special vocabulary for all the nuances of black? One thing is certain : this colour has value in their eyes. In this region they use the Hindi word, Kalaheera, which means ‘black diamond’ when talking about coal. Roughly 400,000 live in Jharia, a town near Dhanbad, the main city of the state of Jharkhand . The lunar-like soil hasn’t produced vegetation for a long time and won’t be doing so any time soon. But the danger for local inhabitants does not come from the black dust that is permanently floating in their environment. The danger is deeper and is developing under their feet in the heart of coal veins. Bad management of the mines has led to uncontrolled underground fires. For more than a century, millions of tons of coal have burnt up. It equivalent to a volcano growing under Jharia. Toxic gas vapours spread into the atmosphere, the ground is sinking and houses are starting to crack. Flames burst up by the roadside. The imminence of a human disaster is very real. The Indian government is aware of this but doesn’t seem to want to free up enough funds to relocate te population at risk. In Jharia people are not prepared to leave at any cost."

 

Photos and Text by Thomas Van Den Driessche | On Colors Magazine

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Tata City by Thomas Van Den Driessche

Tata City by Thomas Van Den Driessche | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Tata Stadium, Tata Football Academy, Tata Amusement Park, Tata Center For Excellence, Tata School… In Jamshedpur, the historic headquarters of India’s largest industrial group, everything seems “Tata branded”.

Photographs by Thomas Van Den Driessche,
On LaLettreDeLaPhotographie.com 

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Photo Essay | 2002: The Year they Were Born, By Garima Jain

Photo Essay | 2002: The Year they Were Born, By Garima Jain | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Ayesha Rashid Bhai Mansuri & Nausim Rashid Bhai Mansuri,

10 Juhapura, Ahmedabad

Father irons clothes


"We have lived here for eight years, on this side of the road we call ‘Border’. We cross to the Hindu side only to buy vegetables. Recently, Hindus and Muslims threw stones at each other across the Border during a wedding. I know what a Hindu looks like because they wear a bindi and tika. The only time we meet them is when we go with father to the factory where he works. It’s in the Hindu area."

 

Photographs and text by Garima Jain

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