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Indian Photographies
Visual Culture in the Subcontinent
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Interview | Fabien Charuau on his work

Documentary photographer Fabien Charuau talks to us about his new projects - The Great Unwashed and Send Some Candids.

The Great Unwashed is a series of simple snapshots of Indian men. The focus in this collection is about the ambiguous sensuality that comes from masses of men living together. Send Some Candids is a collection of found photos of women in public spaces, curated from online adult forums.

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Gauri Gill | 'The Last Days of Freedom'

Gauri Gill | 'The Last Days of Freedom' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"The girls who come to the fair have an urge to know [of the outside world]. Those who stepped into my photo tent also wished to portray themselves as they are, or as they see themselves, or to invent new selves for the camera. Their attempts may have been tentative or bold, but this book may be seen as a catalogue of that desire.

I think of Urma and Halima, two girls who belong to the nomadic Jogi community, one that has few rights, that survives precariously on the fringes of villages and small towns and may almost be said to exist outside society as we know it, without access to land, regular employment, schools, healthcare or recourse to law. Urma and Halima came into the tent and sat down very straight on the white plastic chair and the black metal stool, flanking the plastic flower arrangement on its gleaming stand. They looked at the camera with poise and confidence, not unlike the Maharanis of a hundred years ago. This book is for them."

 

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Ballika Mela by Gauri Gill, published by Edition Patrick Frey, will be released in Delhi in September 2012. With 72 black-and-white plates and 32 colour reproductions, essays by Gill herself and Manju Saran (in English and Hindi), the book is a record of Gill’s photo studio set up to take portraits of the predominantly female adolescents who attended the fair in remote and rural western Rajasthan

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Exhibition at PhotoInk, Delhi | 'Chandigarh: Portrait of a City' by Manuel Bougot

Exhibition at PhotoInk, Delhi | 'Chandigarh: Portrait of a City' by Manuel Bougot | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Manuel Bougot’s interest in Le Corbusier’s architecture began in the 1980s when he worked on Caroline Maniaque’s thesis in architecture – on the Jaoul Houses, built in 1954, in Neuilly, France. From 2006 onwards, Bogout renewed his interest in Le Corbusier, attending talks on Chandigarh and photographed the only building the architect ever built for himself – a cabanon (a summer cabin) in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin. The desire to photograph Chandigarh thus became imperative to further any understanding of Le Corbusier, the urban designer, and his philosophy about architecture and modernism."

 

Photograph by Manuel Bougot.

Article from Platform Mag.

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ShaluSharma's comment, September 18, 2012 5:59 AM
Interesting one.
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Interview | Riyas Komu on the upcoming Kochi-Muziris Biennale

Interview | Riyas Komu on the upcoming Kochi-Muziris Biennale | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Last year India participated in the Venice Biennale for the first time and the most recent edition of Delhi’s India Art Fair (2012), attracted 85,000 visitors; contemporary Indian art is being exhibited and sold all over the world. Later this year sees the launch of a new biennale and the first to ever occur in India, the Kochi-Muziris Biennale, which is co-curated by its founders, Bose Krishnamachari and Riyas Komu. Opening on 12 December and running until 13 March, the biennale will welcome 80 artists from the MENASA regions and beyond. Riyas Komu, talked to Isabella Ellaheh Hughes."

 

Photo by Dheeraj Thakur : One of the potential venues for the biennale, a former bank on the waterfront, Calvetti area of Kochi

 

Article by Isabella Ellaheh Hughes | Frieze

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Exhibition in Mumbai | 'The Visitor' by Nandini Valli Muthiah

Exhibition in Mumbai | 'The Visitor' by Nandini Valli Muthiah | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Artist Nandini Valli Muthiah is showcasing The Visitor, a collection of images that imagine Lord Krishna in a parallel universe with several alter egos.

 

Photo by Nandini Valli Muthiah | Article by Soma Das

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Books | Richard Bartholomew, The Art Critic : An insider's account of the birth of Modern Indian Art

Books | Richard Bartholomew, The Art Critic : An insider's account of the birth of Modern Indian Art | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Featuring over 250 illustrations and including an extensive selection of never-before-seen black-and-white photographs by Richard documenting the art scene, The Art Critic is an absolute essential for art lovers and enthusiasts keen on an insider’s account of the untold story of Modern Indian Art.

 

Archive Editors: Rati Bartholomew • Carmen Kagal • Pablo Bartholomew

Introduction by Geeta Kapur

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Feature | Dayanita Singh: A Ticket to Freedom

Feature | Dayanita Singh: A Ticket to Freedom | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Dayanita Singh is considered to be the most important figure in contemporary Indian photography. Recently, a selection of her black and white portraits was acquired for the Deutsche Bank Collection. Singh is currently represented in the major group exhibition "Where Three Dreams Cross: 150 Years of Photography from India, Pakistan, and Bangladesh." Sunil Gupta, curator of the exhibition at the Fotomuseum Winterthur, introduces the artist, who lives in Delhi and Goa.

 

Photograph by Dayanita Singh

Article by Sunil Gupta | ArtMag

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Photojournalism | "Inside Fractured Territories" by Vivek Singh

Photojournalism | "Inside Fractured Territories" by Vivek Singh | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Finally, those uprooted from their homes, anywhere in the world by conflict, human rights violations, natural disasters and other comparable causes, who remain within the borders of their own countries – are subject to rights driven excesses, both during and after displacement. Frequently, they are discriminated against for being displaced and exposed to discrimination on racial, ethnic and gender grounds. I strongly believe that violence, internal displacement, lack of governance and environmental issues remain hugely under reported from India’s North-Eastern states. Surprisingly, this seems acceptable to most of our editors and therefore requires long-term engagement by both photographers and journalists alike, taking it to a wider audience both within the country and on an international stage."

 

Photographs and Text by Vivek Singh | Galli Magazine

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Sub-Topical Heat: New Art from South Asia

Sub-Topical Heat: New Art from South Asia | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Sub-Topical Heat is a collection of nine individually skilled artists, rather than an exhibition whose works are linked in any strong group thematic. It is not practice, politics or medium that links these artists but a post hoc interest in borders, national identity, trade and religion.

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Exhibition in Bangalore | 37 Indian Still Lifes

Exhibition in Bangalore | 37 Indian Still Lifes | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

For this exhibition, Tasveer gave a brief to 37 of the leading photographers working in India today to investigate the subject of still life, and to see how this subject can be explored in a specifically Indian context. Whilst one of the central genres in the history of art, this has been an all but neglected field of enquiry in contemporary photography in India - overshadowed primarily by the social documentary of Indian photographers and the increasingly conceptualised gaze of foreign reportage in India. As such, the cultures, events and landscape of India are often documented, but the presentation of physical objects, and the narratives therein, remain largely un-investigated.

Photographers include Karen Knorr, Vivek Vilasini, Saibal Das, Mahesh Shantaram, Neeta Madahar and Jyothi Bhatt.

 

Photograph by Anna Fox, from the 'Hotel Interiors' series | Tasveer

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Obituary: Prabuddha Dasgupta

Obituary: Prabuddha Dasgupta | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
Prabuddha and I were both intrigued by Leonard Cohen’s “Famous Blue Raincoat”.

 

Photograph by Prabuddha Dasgupta 

Text by Aveek Sen | The Telegraph

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City Report | Delhi

City Report | Delhi | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Since the late 1990s, the art scene in the Indian capital and its environs has swelled from a handful of galleries to a thriving constellation of non-profits, residency programmes and artist-run spaces."

Article by Devika Singh and Raqs Media Collective | Frieze 

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Vintage India via Cecil Beaton

Vintage India via Cecil Beaton | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"In 1945, in one of its more inspired moments, the British Ministry of Information dispatched Cecil Beaton; chosen photographer to royalty, darling photographer to the likes of Audrey Hepburn and Greta Garbo and later the world-famous designer of My Fair Lady and Gigi, to the Far East to take pictures of the British Empire and its allies at war. The result was not only a superb collection of photographs but a breathtakingly vivid written portrait of India, Burma, and China at a historic turning-point in their histories.

Beaton was a great observer and, perhaps unexpectedly, a great describer. In remarkably few words, he can make you see, hear, smell, almost touch the dusty Indian countryside, the shimmering, casual magnificence of a Bombay virtually untouched by war..."

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Exhibition in NYC | Ether by Fazal Sheikh

Exhibition in NYC | Ether by Fazal Sheikh | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"The northern Indian city of Varanasi, perched on the banks of the Ganges river, is perhaps the oldest continuously inhabited city in the world, a site that has drawn pilgrims literally for millennia. It’s famed for its burning ghats—the sloped-approaches to the waterfront where for centuries devotees have brought their deceased loved ones for cremation, then floating the ashes into the mighty, holy Ganges. Some Hindus still believe it’s auspicious to pass away on these steps. In Varanasi’s morning fogs and along its shrine-lined streets, visitors can feel an ancient, intangible power, a sense of place that is defined more by ritual and time than geography.

 

Varanasi’s burning grounds drew critically-acclaimed photographer Fazal Sheikh, whose latest project, Ether, on exhibit at Pace/MacGill gallery in New York City till Oct. 20, is the product of his own nocturnal wanderings in the old town. New York-born Sheikh’s two earlier India-based projects—Moksha (2005), of a community of widows, and Ladli (2007), portraits of young women in orphanages, hospitals, brothels—had a decidedly engaged, political edge. Ether is less so. “Other documentary pieces of mine are much clearer in the pointed nature of what I wanted to say,” says Sheikh, who first came to prominence with his work from refugee camps in Kenya. “This project is a bit more open and broad. It’s an exploration of a mood...”

 

Photograph by Fazal Sheikh

Article by Ishaan Taroor | Time Lightbox

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Exhibition in Delhi | 'Mastering the Lens : Before and After Cartier-Bresson in Pondicherry'

Exhibition in Delhi | 'Mastering the Lens : Before and After Cartier-Bresson in Pondicherry' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
Photographs culled from an unbound and unpublished album of Henri Cartier-Bresson taken in Pondicherry are at the core of an upcoming exhibition...

 

" In Henri Cartier-Bresson’s life that remained eventful till the end, one chapter belonged to the photographer’s visit to Aurobindo Ashram in Pondicherry in the ’50s. The father of modern photojournalism had of course been to India earlier, met Mahatma Gandhi and even covered his funeral. All of that remains well-known but his work on the Ashram remains comparatively less talked about. Bresson, it is said, had a knack for bearing witness to historic moments. So this time too, he was there shooting Sri Aurobindo, the revered yogi-philosopher-guru-poet, just a few months before his death.

The Alkazi Foundation for the Arts in collaboration with Alliance Francaise de Delhi is presenting some masterly frames made during this engagement. The exhibition “Mastering the Lens: Before and After Cartier-Bresson in Pondicherry” will be accompanied by the launch of a publication collaboratively published by the Alkazi Collection, Mapin and the French Embassy. “Cartier-Bresson was fascinated by The Mother (Mirra Alfassa) and what was going on at the Ashram. He sought permission to photograph it and it was granted. He stayed there for 10 days. Now the photographs that he shot were compiled by The Mother into albums. The Mother bought negatives from him and brought out as many as 30 albums but only one album remains now,” says Rahaab Allana, curator of the Alkazi Foundation for the Arts.

The majority of the images to be showcased in this exhibition belong to this unbound and unpublished album of Cartier-Bresson. Besides taking the last pictures of Sri Aurobindo Ghose in the company of his spiritual companion, The Mother, the French photographer also recorded his observations and experiences. The exhibition also features these notes. Now, even though Alkazi Collection owns these photographs, the copyright remains with Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson which was managed by his wife Martine Franck, who passed away last month. The exhibition is dedicated to Franck, also a Magnum photographer, specialising in portraiture photography."

 

Photo : 'The Mother Playing tennis' | Henri Cartier-Bresson

Article by Shailaja Tripathi | The Hindu

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Exhibition at NGMA | 'Project Cinema City'

Exhibition at NGMA | 'Project Cinema City' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Organised by the National Gallery of Modern Art and Ministry of Culture to commemorate 100 years of Indian cinema, Project Cinema City brings together more than 20 artists, designers, technicians and architects in a collaborative show that excavates the connections between the Hindi film industry and the city of Bombay/Bambai/Mumbai, which is both the real-life site of its birth and the imaginary locale where so many of its narratives unfold.

The traits of urban modernity—anonymity, artifice, technology, speed—are echoed in our experience of cinema. Project Cinema City contains several art works that draw on these connections, inviting us to enter a space of fantasy that’s as much about the excitement and frisson of the city as it is about the pleasures of the cinematic. The first of these is a collaborative audio-visual piece that involves a series of women talking of the experience of watching films. One woman talks of how she missed out on a family expedition to the first air-conditioned theatre (Liberty) to show a Hindi film, yet another reminisces about the women of the family doing ‘full-make-up’ in the cinema bathroom so that they were actually late for the movie.... "

 

Photo : 'Fearless Nadia to the Rescue", a frame from 'Return of the Phantom Lady' by Pushpamala N.

 

Article by Trisha Gupta | Open Magazine

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Featured Artist | Bani Abidi

Featured Artist | Bani Abidi | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Artist : Bani Abidi

Title : Pari Wania, 7:42 pm, 22 August 2008, Ramadan, Karachi
Date(s) : 2009
Dimensions : 50.8 x 76.2 cms
Material : Duratrans Lightbox
Website : www.greencardamom.net
Credit : Courtesy Green Cardamom and the artist

 

"..Karachi Series 1 is an exploration of the place of religious minorities in a public environment not known for its acceptance of difference. During the month of Ramadan, at sunset, (in August at roughly 7.45pm) the time when Muslims break their fast, the streets of Karachi are deserted. By venturing into the street and performing everyday tasks in public, Abidi’s non-Muslim subjects reclaim a time and a place where their status as equal citizens in metropolitan Karachi is not contested..."

 

Bani Abidi’s videos, photographic works and drawings use elements of performance and orchestration to explore the processes of political history, popular imagination and identity formation. Abidi was born in Karachi in 1971, and currently lives between New Delhi and Karachi.

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Photo Essay | Bharat Sikka's Photographs of Bhutan

Photo Essay | Bharat Sikka's Photographs of Bhutan | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Bhutan receives fewer visitors in a year than New York City does in a day. The country's breathtaking vistas and rich culture, captured here by photographer Bharat Sikka, remain despite recent steps towards modernity.

 

LightBox | TIME.com

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ShaluSharma's comment, September 11, 2012 12:36 PM
Thank you for this. I would love to go there one day.
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Documentary | Imaging India @ 65

Documentary | Imaging India @ 65 | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

As India turns 65, we find an interesting way to capture the complexity and the chaos of the past 6 and half decades. Through the lens of Indian photojournalists, from the 1940's to the present.

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‘Desires Wrought upon the Surface of an Image’: Photography as an Art in India | An Article by Rahaab Allana

‘Desires Wrought upon the Surface of an Image’: Photography as an Art in India  | An Article by Rahaab Allana | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Photographers as ‘Artists’ appeared at a distinct moment in the history of photography in India; these ‘artist-photographers’ based their work on the aesthetics of exchange between tradition, fine art and even performance. This allows for a more complex and unrestrained view of the discipline, one in which the camera develops close links with painting and printmaking. Furthermore, these photographers sought to publicize their spaces as art ateliers, equipped with statues, furniture and painted backdrops, further emphasized by the versos of card-mounted photographs..."

 

Photograph : C.A Dannenberg
HH Maharaja Jaswant Singh of Bharatpur,
(Handnote on back) "Rajah of Bhurtpore,
photographed & painted by JCA Dannenberg 1863,
Sent to the Viceroy from the Rajah",
hand painted-albumen print,
dated 1863, 144 x 110 mm.
Courtesy The Alkazi Collection of Photography

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Ghat - A Pinhole Movie Project

Ghat - A Pinhole Movie Project | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Stenop.es is an experimental, visual project by Paris-based photographers and cameramen, Romain Alary and Antoine Levi that turns an entire apartment room into a pinhole camera.

 

The idea behind Stenop.es: A Pinhole Movie Project is to project the outside world onto the inside and merge the two landscapes. This is achieved by, ‘darkening an entire apartment and blocking out all the light from the outside except for the small amount let through the pinholes’. The effect created is a collage of projected images, turned upside down on to the apartment walls, creating a kind of mesh of ordinary household objects with the edifices and landforms outside.

 

When asked about the conception of the project Antonie and Romain said that, they had always been interested in using antique techniques on digital support. Which is why, in 2008 they spent a year travelling from Paris to Tokyo, where they captured a lot of pictures and films with cameras like the Lomo LC-A, Leica and 5d. But it was in a rented room in Pushkar, India, that their meanderings finally came to an end and gave birth to an idea. The room, that was located in an ancient palace that overlooked a sacred lake, had a tiny hole in the window pane, which in the morning projected the moving forms of the landscape outside, on the ceiling. The filmmakers realized that using this technique they could turn this room into a nice pinhole project.

 

Since the inception of the project they have created two films, one as mentioned above in Pushkar, India called Ghat, and the other one shot in Paris, which remains untitled.

Their first film, Ghat was a finalist in 2011’s short films contest called, India is.

 

See the video shot in time lapse here : http://player.vimeo.com/video/46175179

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"Visual haikus needed, not just pretty pictures"

"Visual haikus needed, not just pretty pictures" | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Having said that I should mention that a decent amount of high quality work happens in India but those images are not easily available for people at large to view, interpret and enjoy. They are confined to galleries or expensive photo books, which only enthusiasts and connoisseurs visit. Almost all other art forms are easier to access. We need many public venues for photographers to showcase their work easily; we need more unbiased curators and photo-editors to guide the photographers as well. In this context I would like to mention the work of Blindboys (blindboys.org) who have been exhibiting very good photography on the streets and making it really accessible to everyone. They are trying to bring photographers and viewers together. But for photography to tunnel through and emerge as a truly meaningful form of art and communication, photographers must learn to see beyond the obvious. We have to go beyond the world that we can experience through our senses or the conscious mind. Photographers have to understand their sub and unconscious minds create images of that realm. We need to go beyond taking pictures of people and objects to involve in self- reflection. We need to convey our thoughts and feelings and tell how we see the society and our times with our photographs."

 

Article and Photograph by Mahesh Bhat | Bangalore Mirror

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"At a theatre not near you" | The Travelling Tent Cinemas of Maharashtra, by Amit Madheshiya

"At a theatre not near you" | The Travelling Tent Cinemas of Maharashtra, by Amit Madheshiya | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"The focus of The Travelling Tent Cinemas of Maharashtra, an exhibition of photographs that took place at Nehru Memorial Museum and Library as part of the recent Humanities in Ferment conference, is predominantly the audience. The photos literally take members of the audience out of the darkness of the hall, or shall we say tent, and shows them in their various moods, locked in the gaze of cinema.

 

The impulse to document the travelling cinemas was borne out of their absence in any form of mainstream records, say Amit Madheshiya and Shirley Abraham, photographers and researchers based in Mumbai who have been travelling with the cinemas for about four years now. “When we saw the cinemas, we were intrigued by it and curious to see the literature on them. They have not been written about in mainstream history, apart from being treated as a unit of distribution...”

 

Photograph by Amit Madheshya | The full series is available at http://amitmadheshiya.photoshelter.com/

Article by Budhaditya Bhattacharya | The Hindu

 

See also this 2011 article on the same subject

http://www.thehindu.com/todays-paper/tp-features/tp-fridayreview/article2574997.ece

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The Fearless Photographer

The Fearless Photographer | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Dasgupta, 58, who died of a heart attack in Alibaug on Sunday, left his stamp of boldness and originality in his commercial and non-commercial work.

 

Photograph by Prabuddha Dasgupta

Text by David De Souza | Mint

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Op-ed | Ram Rahman, 'A sharper focus'

Op-ed | Ram Rahman, 'A sharper focus' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

" CONTEMPORARY Indian photography in its current avatar is a child of its earlier history. For many years, photojournalism was not only a genre where a professional was able to earn a living, it was a platform for show-casing work to a very wide audience. In the first half of the last century, there was a fairly widespread ‘pictorialist’ tradition, where photographers with artistic ambitions found a home. After independence, the new industries provided a base for a developing industrial and advertising photography scene. But never through all those years was photography afforded a place in the nascent art gallery scene..."

 

Article by Ram Rahman | Seminar

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