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Visual Culture in the Subcontinent
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Photo Essay | 'Performing Politics' by Mahesh Shantaram

Photo Essay | 'Performing Politics' by Mahesh Shantaram | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Interested in experiencing first hand the political frenzy surrounding the sixteenth Lok Sabha elections, Mahesh Shantaram packed his bags and went on a cross country trip in March 2014, following the election trail. Mapping the charged political landscape of the country through the lens of his camera, he not only documents the spectacle of democracy, but also reveals it in its making..."

Photographs by Mahesh Shantaram
Text by Shilpa Vijayakrishnan |Tasveer

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Of Misery and Glory

Of Misery and Glory | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

The story of two photographers, Raghu Rai and Kishor Parekh, and their books on the birth of Bangladesh

Article : Elizabeth Kuruvilla | Open Magazine 

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Interview | "I simply love the act of searching for an image" – Asim Rafiqui

Interview | "I simply love the act of searching for an image" – Asim Rafiqui | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"...Photography gives me a way to voice my protest, make my argument, present my case, and show my sensibilities to others. I had not found another way of doing this. I photograph so that I can share, articulate, debate, argument, and make a case. Photography is an extension of my self, and it allows me to create artifacts which become, as I argued in my introduction to the The Idea of India project [http://www.asimrafiqui.com/blog/], vehicles for the imagination, both human, political and civic. I am a very political individual and as a result a very political photographer. What I mean is that my personal works are always about something more than aesthetics – they are personal, and something very personal is being communicated in them. It may not be obvious what that is, but its there and I often struggle myself to articulate it, but assume that the images along with my writings will reveal it. My works have a point of view, I make specific arguments through them, and I want to communicate specific points of view..."

 

Photograph by Asim Rafiqui

Interview by Mahesh Bhat | http://writingsonphotography.wordpress.com/

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Documentary | Imaging India @ 65

Documentary | Imaging India @ 65 | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

As India turns 65, we find an interesting way to capture the complexity and the chaos of the past 6 and half decades. Through the lens of Indian photojournalists, from the 1940's to the present.

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Ghar/घर: Javed Iqbal | Galli Magazine

Ghar/घर: Javed Iqbal | Galli Magazine | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"More people have been displaced since Independence by development projects than by the partition and a majority of them have been indigenous adivasis or Dalits.

Landless Dalits who would migrate to Mumbai after Independence would eventually face bulldozers and the fate of every slum: demolition..."

Images and text by Javed Iqbal

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RIP Homai Vyarawalla

RIP Homai Vyarawalla | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

India’s first woman photo-journalist Homai Vyarawalla died at a private hospital here this morning at the age of 98. (...)

Born on December 9, 1913 to a Parsi family, Vyarawalla grew up in Mumbai and moved to Delhi in 1942 where she photographed events leading to Independence, as an employee of the British Information Services.

She took photographs of key events that would have a decisive impact on Indian history, including a meeting where leaders voted for the June 3 plan for India’s partition.

She also photographed the first flag hoisting ceremony at Red Fort on August 15, 1947, the departure of Lord Mountbatten from India and the funerals of Mahatma Gandhi, Jawaharlal Nehru and Lal Bahadur Shastri.

She was awarded the Padma Vibhushan in January last year.

 

(Source : PTI)

 

Link : Homai Vyarawalla, a documentary by Anik Gosh (2006)

 

 

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Sydney 2013 Photo Festival | 'Crossfire' by Shahidul Alam

Sydney 2013 Photo Festival | 'Crossfire' by Shahidul Alam | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Undeterred by his earlier experience, in 2010 Alam and his team at Drik launched Crossfire, a controversial project that exposed the actions of the Bangladesh government’s enforcement agency, the Rapid Action Battalion, who were basically given license to capture and execute their own people without due process. The photographs in Crossfire capture the locations where people have been killed, or from where they have disappeared.

“It was a national concern and we were horrified by what was happening,” Alam said. “We did this project because we had to. We thought seriously about what the modalities might be at an aesthetic level and also at a strategic level. We worked very hard at the audience engagement in terms of how we handled the media, how the news was taken out."

Photograph © Shahidul Alam
Interview by Alison Stieven-Taylor | Le Journal de la Photographie

  

 

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Koodankulam: A Nuclear Plant in My Backyard | Photo Essay by Amirtharaj Stephen

Koodankulam: A Nuclear Plant in My Backyard | Photo Essay by Amirtharaj Stephen | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"I come from a village called kavalkinaru in tirunelveli district of tamil nadu, not very far from kanniyakumari. my father was employed at a heavy water plant in tuticorin and i spent the first 24 years of my life in the atomic energy township there. i was always told by the people in my township that nuclear energy was safe and that it was the future. I believed them..."

 

Photograph and text by Amirtharaj Stephen

 

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A Photographer’s Account of Bal Thackeray’s Funeral

A Photographer’s Account of Bal Thackeray’s Funeral | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"The crowds were filing in now, small men casting long shadows that reminded me of Vincent Laforet’s aerial photographs of skaters in New York City. I shot some photos on my phone, instagrammed and tweeted those. In a few minutes they went viral. My caption for one picture was ‘This is Not Tahrir Square’, the sarcasm was missed but the photo was widely retweeted."

 

Photography and Text by Ritesh Uttamchandani | Open Magazine

More of his work on http://riteshuttamchandani.photoshelter.com

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Photojournalism | "Inside Fractured Territories" by Vivek Singh

Photojournalism | "Inside Fractured Territories" by Vivek Singh | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Finally, those uprooted from their homes, anywhere in the world by conflict, human rights violations, natural disasters and other comparable causes, who remain within the borders of their own countries – are subject to rights driven excesses, both during and after displacement. Frequently, they are discriminated against for being displaced and exposed to discrimination on racial, ethnic and gender grounds. I strongly believe that violence, internal displacement, lack of governance and environmental issues remain hugely under reported from India’s North-Eastern states. Surprisingly, this seems acceptable to most of our editors and therefore requires long-term engagement by both photographers and journalists alike, taking it to a wider audience both within the country and on an international stage."

 

Photographs and Text by Vivek Singh | Galli Magazine

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"President on beach, please shut eyes"

"President on beach, please shut eyes" | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

A photograph of President Pratibha Patil on the Goa beach surrounded by bikini-clad women and men in swimming trunks carried in newspapers today has angered officials here who summoned three photo journalists and questioned them.

Police called three local photo-journalists, who had shot Patil's pictures on the beach, and recorded their statements. Since the President is on a private visit, picture-taking was not allowed, police said.

Deputy Superintendent of Police Umesh Gaonkar said that taking pictures of the President was strictly prohibited as she was on a private visit.

But the police action has angered the photo-journalists here. The state-level union of photojournalists called it harassment.

"The photo-journalists were just doing their job. They were nowhere near the President. The pictures were taken with 400 mm zoom lenses," Rajtilak Naik, President, Photo-journalists' Association of Goa (PJAG) told PTI.

 

Source : PTI

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