Indian Photographies
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Indian Photographies
Visual Culture in the Subcontinent
Curated by khicṛī
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PROJECT | 'Best in Show' by Karan Vaid

PROJECT | 'Best in Show' by Karan Vaid | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Karan Vaid‘s ongoing project Best in Show captures Indian dog culture in two parts. Part 1 is a quirky look at the modern Indian dog shows: doting owners, tear-jerking moments and mysterious paraphernalia. From Patiala to Palakkad, Karan photographs what would be best described as a dog mela; brooches and spike collars, bronze plated participation medals, grooming aids and an awful lot of people talking to dogs. Part 2 is a deeply personal affair, where the photographer opens out family albums. Pictures of family, dogs past, friends and even some where you can make out a young Karan. In the India of 80s and 90s you can see the essence of the work; the bond between man and animal. A little reminiscing of childhood never goes amiss…"

Blindboys.org 

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Delhi Photographer Chandan Gomes Looks Back on His Modest Childhood Home - Feature Shoot

Delhi Photographer Chandan Gomes Looks Back on His Modest Childhood Home  - Feature Shoot | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

20 Chandan Gomes (MA 2015) is an Indian photographer currently pursuing his Masters in Philosophy from St. Stephen's College in Delhi. His photographic work germinates from the diaries and journals he has kept over the years, and is heavily influenced by literature and philosophy. Stemming from the conflict he experienced between his modest Delhi upbringing and prestigious education, Gomes' project There Are Things I Call Home reexamines his sense of origin through the objects that surrounded him as a child, attempting to reclaim a sense of intimacy in a home that has, for him, become estranged and distant."


Photograph | Chandan Gomes

Text | Acacia Johnson (Feature Shoot)

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ARTICLE | “Zenana Studio: Early Women Photographers of Bengal”

ARTICLE | “Zenana Studio: Early Women Photographers of Bengal” | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Siddhartha Ghosh’s Chobi Tola: Bangalir Photography-Chorcha (Taking Pictures: The Practice of Photography by Bengalis) is a pioneering work that came out in 1988 to critical acclaim and describes the history of photography in Bengal from its inception during the colonial period. The work has an important section on early women photographers in India that will interest lay readers and social scientists alike, not only because it unearths, through meticulous research, a number of early photographers whose contributions would otherwise have been forgotten by posterity, but also for exposing the ways in which colonial modernity touched and shaped women’s lives in ways we do not normally think about.

Photography was a capital-intensive pursuit and usually a pastime of only those who could afford it. But Ghosh’s book draws attention to the ways in which a photographic studio, along with other institutions, such as railways and English schools, became an important feature of colonized Bengali lives. Photographs were the clearest images of the interface between the two cultures: the colonized subject’s resistance and mimicry of Western sartorial and cultural norms was most evident in the early photos of Indian men and women. But the photographs also constructed social and family histories in ways inconceivable even a few decades earlier. Professional and commercial photography was available in Calcutta from the 1840s onward and widely used as a tool in the British colonial government to document, classify and record events, landscapes and people., The advent of women as photographers adds to our understanding of this fascinating history of the Empire’s visual outcomes.

Siddhartha Ghosh (1948-2002) was a mechanical engineer by education and a translator, writer and social scientist by inclination. His many works include the seminal study of nineteenth century British technology and its impact on colonized Bengalis, Koler Shohor Kolkata, (1991), seven books popularizing science for children and one work of science fiction.

 Translated by Debjani Sengupta | TAP

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REVIEW | 'Love, Honour & Disobey' by Colin Pantall

REVIEW | 'Love, Honour & Disobey' by Colin Pantall | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Given an open commission to return to India to shoot a new body of work, Max Pinckers approached the Love Commandos in New Delhi, an organisation that helps couples who have fallen in love escape the threat of honour violence from their disapproving families. But, finds Colin Pantall, the result is a world away from a traditional documentary record, instead developing the approach of his previous work, using staged scenarios influenced by Bollywood cinema..."

Text by Colin Pantall.
First published in the British Journal of Photography magazine, UK, October 2013. 

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REVIEW | 'Studio Suhag' & 'My Life is My Message' at Art Heritage Gallery

REVIEW | 'Studio Suhag' & 'My Life is My Message' at Art Heritage Gallery | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Truth and Theatre: Two recent exhibitions blur the distinction between portraiture and ‘performance'

Text by Trisha Gupta | Open Magazine 

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FEATURE | Sarker Protick : 'Of River and Lost Lands'

FEATURE | Sarker Protick : 'Of River and Lost Lands' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Drowned houses, floating trees, broken structures are traces of life that was once here. Places I have photographed do not exist anymore. Monsoon arrives and the river runs fastest. The lands get washed away and disappear. It is the river that people depend on, it is the river that takes away everything."

 

All images © courtesy of Sarker Protick

sarkerprotick.com
sarkerprotick.wordpress.com/

 

Via Landscape Stories

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Sydney 2013 Photo Festival | 'Crossfire' by Shahidul Alam

Sydney 2013 Photo Festival | 'Crossfire' by Shahidul Alam | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Undeterred by his earlier experience, in 2010 Alam and his team at Drik launched Crossfire, a controversial project that exposed the actions of the Bangladesh government’s enforcement agency, the Rapid Action Battalion, who were basically given license to capture and execute their own people without due process. The photographs in Crossfire capture the locations where people have been killed, or from where they have disappeared.

“It was a national concern and we were horrified by what was happening,” Alam said. “We did this project because we had to. We thought seriously about what the modalities might be at an aesthetic level and also at a strategic level. We worked very hard at the audience engagement in terms of how we handled the media, how the news was taken out."

Photograph © Shahidul Alam
Interview by Alison Stieven-Taylor | Le Journal de la Photographie

  

 

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Interview with Dayanita Singh | "The Eunuch is the New Maharaja"

Interview with Dayanita Singh | "The Eunuch is the New Maharaja" | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

 

"A.S.: In some of the works in Go Away Closer, there seems to be a tendency to create drama out of visual patterns and their behaviour. I refer here to works that create an effect out of presenting objects stacked in a uniform manner - chairs lined up in regular rows in a cinema theatre or in a room, scooters arranged in a warehouse, gloves hanging limp on window bars. Do you feel that as much as one needs to explore the hypnotic quality that repetition as a trope possesses (the incantatory effect that words can achieve and the spectacular effect that objects can), one has also to be aware of the dangers of it being used in a manner that is formulaic?

D.S.: Of course, there is a danger there. If you are seeing a pattern and not the emotion that I am seeing in these photographs, then, it is something that I need to take very seriously. I would definitely not want my work to be dominated by a sense of pattern. There is a kind of conditioning that comes out of practice, thought, and participation. A moment compels me to pull the trigger and take the picture - I respond intuitively. Rather than consciously, with an idea in my head. Perhaps, too often, we are conditioned to think of the photogenic and the photographeable. Some of my latest works look at capturing that which is not photographeable. And that which is not traditionally photogenic.

How you capture an image depends on your instinct - the way you allow your experiences to shape the act. What you draw on could be from literature, from music, from cinema, from life. As well as from your understanding of the medium. Take light, for example, the very basic element of Photography. I am very conscious of light even when I am not photographing. How it falls, how it fills up a space. Where it lingers. Light in complete darkness, etc.

There are images I have taken recently which have stayed on for sentimental reasons. Images I made because I had to, for my own sake, or just because I wanted to share a view with someone. Myself Mona Ahmed (2001) was born out of my admiration for Mona - the tough life she has led, the choices she has made over the years. Quite a few years ago, there could be no shows of Indian art/photography without pictures of maharajas; then, of course, over time, urban family portraits took over. Now, you have to have images of eunuchs if you are mounting a show, especially internationally. The Eunuch is the new Maharaja. It's amazing how fast certain themes become stereotypes."

 

Interview by Abhay Sardesai | ARTINDIA

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Chobi Mela VII | Interview of Shahidul Alam

Chobi Mela VII | Interview of Shahidul Alam | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

I personally think pretty much all the arts benefit from people who work in the periphery, in the edges. I think photography has lot to gain from people outside the field of photography, in terms of what they have to offer, how they can contribute to the medium and Chobi Mela always encourages that interaction. It’s been a very fluid border in movement and direction. I think certainly the fact that this is a festival where fine art photography, conceptual work, documentary work, 3D work, whatever, gets space is one of the things that makes it so rich. It’s not so predictable. Every year it is different. And I think every year it is evolving...."

Interview by Munem Wasif | Le Journal de la Photographie

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Abhishek Poddar on the Landscape of Contemporary Photography in India

Abhishek Poddar on the Landscape of Contemporary Photography in India | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Amongst so many galleries around today, we needed to be clear about how we define and differentiate ourselves. Tasveer's relationship to photography is perhaps different from the other organisations that are Involved with art and photography that exist in India. Tasveer's contribution has been as a commercial gallery, and one that tries to encourage both the promotion and also the sale of photographs in India. These concepts are intrinsically linked, and both have therefore gone some way to defining the identity and motivation of Tasveer over the years. I 'll attempt to briefly and simply about the history of the photography market and how this relates to India, followed by an outline of a few of the ways in which Tasveer tries to do more than just sell and exhibit photographs, and how we are also, to the best of our ability, trying to contribute to the wonderful and fast evolving landscape of photography in India..."

Text by Abhishek Poddar | The Arts Trust

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Interview | "I simply love the act of searching for an image" – Asim Rafiqui

Interview | "I simply love the act of searching for an image" – Asim Rafiqui | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"...Photography gives me a way to voice my protest, make my argument, present my case, and show my sensibilities to others. I had not found another way of doing this. I photograph so that I can share, articulate, debate, argument, and make a case. Photography is an extension of my self, and it allows me to create artifacts which become, as I argued in my introduction to the The Idea of India project [http://www.asimrafiqui.com/blog/], vehicles for the imagination, both human, political and civic. I am a very political individual and as a result a very political photographer. What I mean is that my personal works are always about something more than aesthetics – they are personal, and something very personal is being communicated in them. It may not be obvious what that is, but its there and I often struggle myself to articulate it, but assume that the images along with my writings will reveal it. My works have a point of view, I make specific arguments through them, and I want to communicate specific points of view..."

 

Photograph by Asim Rafiqui

Interview by Mahesh Bhat | http://writingsonphotography.wordpress.com/

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SADAKCHHAP : Exhibiting Art in Public Space

SADAKCHHAP : Exhibiting Art in Public Space | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
"A street. Your work. An audience.

No application procedure, no entry fee, no complications.

Sadakchaap proposes a public art project in which photographers,visual artists will meet at a given time and space and simply put up their work.

The idea is to make the whole process of art more democratic - free from constraints of whether your work will appeal to a particular gallery, free from the motivation to sell, free from only catering to a particular class.
Here is the chance for you to put up your most meaningful work, meaningful to you personally, not according to a screening committee or anyone else, and to gauge directly the impact your work has on a mixed audience, interacting with them if you choose to.

For its first edition, Sadakchaap proposes a space in the city of Pune, right in the heart of the busy market place, Tulsi Bagh. Photographers are invited to come with their prints at the designated time and put up their work for all to see, comment on and pass judgement! "


Date : 7/1/13

Watch this space for updates and more information.
https://www.facebook.com/humsadakchhap
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Crowfunding | Focus Photo Festival In Mumbai : "Let's Make it Happen"

Crowfunding | Focus Photo Festival In Mumbai : "Let's Make it Happen" | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"In today’s world where every initiative from all spheres of profession and passion jostle to grab the limited available resources and funds, very little come by the way of the creative fields.This is where platforms like the global Kickstarter and India’s very own Wishberry come in to help individuals and groups garner funds for their dream creative projects. A Mumbai-based team of four, comprising of Elise Foster Vander Elst, director of Asia Art Projects, consultant Matthieu Foss, architect Nicola Antaki and photographer Fawzan Husain, knows this occurrence only too well as it gears up to host the city’s first non-commercial photography festival — the FOCUS Festival Mumbai..."

 

Support the project here : 

http://www.wishberry.in/FOCUS-Festival-Mumbai-Let-s-make-it-happen--15054

 

Photograph by Fawzan Husain

Article by Satarupa Paul | ARTINFO

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PROJECT | 'Kitchen Gods' by Priya Kambli

PROJECT | 'Kitchen Gods' by Priya Kambli | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
One of my most startling early childhood memories is of finding one of my father’s painstakingly composed family photographs pierced by my mother. She cut holes in them so as to completely obliterate her own face while not harming the image of my sister and myself beside her. Even as a child I was aware that this act was quite significant - but what it signified was beyond my ability to decipher. As an adult I continue to be disturbed by these artifacts, which not only encompass the photographer’s hand but also the subject’s fingerprints. Even though her incisions have a violent quality to them, as an image-maker I am aesthetically drawn by the physical mark, its presence and its careful placement. These marred artifacts have formed a reference point for my new body of work, Kitchen Gods, but they do not limit the form my own work takes. I am fascinated by how my mother’s physical mark complicates the read of an otherwise mundane family photographs. In this body of work like my mother, I alter the family photographs to modify the stories they tell.

www.priyakambli.com

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TALK | Global Photography Now: The Indian Sub-Continent @ Tate

TALK | Global Photography Now: The Indian Sub-Continent @ Tate | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Internationally acclaimed artists Shezad Dawood, Hasan Elahi, Ram Rahman and the Raqs Media Collective discuss the impact of speed, technology, mass media and economic power on their photographic practice, and the reality of residing within one of the world’s fastest expanding economies. The session is chaired by critic and curator Gayatri Sinha. Part of Global Photography Now."

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Studio Photography and Photoshop in Quetta, Pakistan

Studio Photography and Photoshop in Quetta, Pakistan | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"If you always dreamt of having your picture taken with your favourite celebrity or with a peculiar backdrop which could be anything from Mount Everest to the moon, your dream could come true in less than an hour at a photo-studio in Quetta."


Article by Danial Shah | DAWN

Photographs by Danial Shah and Taqi Hazara

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Interview | S. Paul, 'The Sage'

Interview | S. Paul, 'The Sage' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
At the age of 84, S Paul, the man who shaped Indian photojournalism, still takes his camera out for a daily shoot

An Article by Ritesh Uttamchandani | OPEN Magazine

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INTERVIEW: Curator Urs Stahel on Museums and Photography | Artinfo

INTERVIEW: Curator Urs Stahel on Museums and Photography | Artinfo | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

I think the world has become very complex, and this is an issue for the producer of photographs and for the visitor of photographs, the lookers. We accept complexity in our daily life. When we buy a new computer or a new smart phone, we accept that we get a manual and that we have to read at least a part of it, otherwise we cannot use this machine. In our daily life we are ready to deal with a rather complex world. But very often, in art and photography, we want to simplify the world in a childish way. Here, look, that’s the world, is our attitude. The world is no longer like that. Very often the appearance of the world is hiding what it is. So, pieces of art, pieces of photography, I would suggest could be much more complex, could include text, mix up video, text, and create an environment of visual information. Photographers tend to be too easily satisfied with their own work, they should go further, though. Sometimes I use the word radicalization for that. We should push ourselves, become radically intimate when you do something, in a poetic, radical way. When you’re doing political photography, become a political investigator, expose the horrible truth. When you’re an artist, you radically conceptualize, so don’t do this in-between thing. It doesn’t help, and of that we have enough. I don’t like to show or collect photographs, I always say. I like to show and collect personalities and attitudes. I’m looking for a human being who really deals with the world, like Alan Sekula, who, sadly, died just this August. I would love to give as an idea to pass on to young people to make their reference to that kind of personality. "

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Feature | 'Vez & Me' by Tenzing Dakpa

Feature | 'Vez & Me' by Tenzing Dakpa | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Tenzing’s photo series called Vez & Me took seven years to complete. It aptly documents the personal and professional journey of an artist in the making.
Photograph by Tenzing Dakpa

Article by Priyanka Chharia | Better Photography

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Mumbai’s ‘Focus’ Festival Showcases Women Photographers

Mumbai’s ‘Focus’ Festival Showcases Women Photographers | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Yet it is often women who have collected and organized much of the history of photography in South Asia", Mr Gupta said.

“The family album is often guarded and looked after by the women, who are the repository of a family history,” said Mr. Gupta. “Similarly in India, I think a lot of women have worked in the industry end of photography, doing the research, maintaining archives and facilitating dialogues. The handful of photo-specific agencies and galleries that we know of in India were started by women.”

Photograph : Mohini Chandra
Article : Neha Thirani Bagri | NYT 

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Exhibition in Delhi | 'The Calcutta Diaries' by Pablo Bartholomew

Exhibition in Delhi | 'The Calcutta Diaries' by Pablo Bartholomew | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
“I have photographed what was around me and still do. Journeys were made then and they continue even now. So, I have always recorded what was around me and intrigued me. The engagement was very simple—to look, to see, and to capture; to fill some voids that were created in the past and remain even now. In some ways it has been a form of therapy and sometimes a shield. And in our family, we lived our lives and recorded them, and if now some of it has become ‘history’ then so be it. We all make up our own language as we go along. The archive is a reservoir of this language, and it needs to undergo a constant process of re-engagement and re-assessment, in the same way that language changes and evolves over time. This is what archives are for me. They are the guardians of our memories. Calcutta is still a city that is held by time. I felt it more when I went to visit my grandmother as a child, and it still held that resonance when I went on to the sets of Shatranj Ke Khiladi . So, when I was photographing it, it was not about nostalgia as it may seem like now. Perhaps, with the passage of some more time it may become history. It is all about transitions and time—story becomes myth, myth becomes legend.”


Photograph and words by Pablo Bartholomew

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Chobi Mela VII | 'Fragility'

Chobi Mela VII | 'Fragility' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"In an economy gasping for breath, in an ecosystem reeling under consumption, waste and the ravages of war, the greed of a few threaten the future of many. We challenge you to push back the tide of unbridled growth and lay your stake to a sustainable universe. It is only by embracing the fragility of this world that we will make it your own..."

 

Text by Shahidul Alam
Photograph by Ranak Martin 

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Interview | Artist Hajra Waheed On “Sea Change”, her India Debut Solo

Interview | Artist Hajra Waheed On “Sea Change”, her India Debut Solo | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"As children, most of us spent a large amount of time getting acquainted with our imagined realities. We developed grand vocabularies around these alternate places and people and narratives, and at times, even invited our friends in to explore these intimate spaces with us. I suppose in some ways I never stopped developing stories from that very place. Of course, my narratives have matured (at least I would hope so!) and are deeply influenced by my many lived experiences traversing borders, or rather, living among them. So many of us who live along these lines (either by choice or force) do go missing or disappear at times, just to re-emerge later. I am fascinated by those who — yes, dare to journey across the borders they once built for themselves. It takes courage to do so, to leave what you know in order to better understand what you don’t. “Sea Change” begins to explore the narratives around this very migration — one that is as much physical as it is psychological and/or emotional."


Work by Hajra Waheed
Interview by Rosalyn D'Mello | ArtInfo 

khicṛī's insight:

A show not to be missed, at Kolkata's Experimenter's Gallery

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Interview | Shahidul Alam, "The Empty Frame"

Interview | Shahidul Alam, "The Empty Frame" | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
In the world of photography, Shahidul Alam needs no introduction. He started as a photographer of children, and went on to make a substantial contribution to the medium and its practice not just in his country, Bangladesh, but in the Subcontinent. He set up a photography school, Pathshala, in conjunction with the World Press Photo educational initiative. And he was instrumental in starting Asia’s very first photo festival, Chobi Mela, which attracts the world’s top professionals. In this conversation, he tells Open why the Indian photography movement lags others’, and how Bangladeshi photographers have finally quit cloning his work.

Photograph and Interview by Ronny Sen | Open Magazine
khicṛī's insight:

Very Interesting article in which Shahidul Alam point out the importance of visual literacy, not only for photographers, but also for the professionals who surround them : " We do not have writers on photography at all, we don’t have good curators, we don’t have picture researchers, we don’t have good photo editors, we don’t have good agencies, agents for photographers. These all have to be in place for the medium and for the professional industry to be robust, sustainable and creatively vibrant."

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Mario Pires's curator insight, December 19, 2012 4:13 AM

In is introduction to the article he curated, khicṛī's talks about the importance of visual literacy in India, and that made me think about the situation in Portugal, where the problems are somehow similar to the ones described in the article.

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Glimpses of What to Expect at Chobi Mela 2013

Glimpses of What to Expect at Chobi Mela 2013 | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
One of the most significant events in Asia, Chobi Mela is an international festival of photography and was launched in 2000. Held in Dhaka, Bangladesh, the purpose behind the inception of the festival was to showcase the works of Bangladeshi artists alongside the most exciting work from the rest of the world.

The festival was also to be a platform for debate and discussion. And now in its seventh edition, the festival has gone from strength to strength. It has symbolised a struggle against hegemony and oppression.

The theme for Chobi Mela VII is Fragility and it will present the creative works of world renowned as well as hitherto unknown photographers. To be held between 25 January–7 February 2013, the festival promises to be a wonderful melting pot of photographs and opinions. Of course, there is a lot more to look forward to.

Photograph by Protick Sarker ;
Text By Priyanka | Better Photography
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