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REVIEW | 'Love, Honour & Disobey' by Colin Pantall

REVIEW | 'Love, Honour & Disobey' by Colin Pantall | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Given an open commission to return to India to shoot a new body of work, Max Pinckers approached the Love Commandos in New Delhi, an organisation that helps couples who have fallen in love escape the threat of honour violence from their disapproving families. But, finds Colin Pantall, the result is a world away from a traditional documentary record, instead developing the approach of his previous work, using staged scenarios influenced by Bollywood cinema..."

Text by Colin Pantall.
First published in the British Journal of Photography magazine, UK, October 2013. 

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Crowfunding | Focus Photo Festival In Mumbai : "Let's Make it Happen"

Crowfunding | Focus Photo Festival In Mumbai : "Let's Make it Happen" | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"In today’s world where every initiative from all spheres of profession and passion jostle to grab the limited available resources and funds, very little come by the way of the creative fields.This is where platforms like the global Kickstarter and India’s very own Wishberry come in to help individuals and groups garner funds for their dream creative projects. A Mumbai-based team of four, comprising of Elise Foster Vander Elst, director of Asia Art Projects, consultant Matthieu Foss, architect Nicola Antaki and photographer Fawzan Husain, knows this occurrence only too well as it gears up to host the city’s first non-commercial photography festival — the FOCUS Festival Mumbai..."

 

Support the project here : 

http://www.wishberry.in/FOCUS-Festival-Mumbai-Let-s-make-it-happen--15054

 

Photograph by Fawzan Husain

Article by Satarupa Paul | ARTINFO

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Photo Essay | 'Beanbags' by Zubin Pastakia

Photo Essay | 'Beanbags' by Zubin Pastakia | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Mumbai can drive you crazy. And because (or, perhaps, despite) of this, you want to make sense of it. You want to make some kind of order out of it. And more often than not, in trying to create order, you succumb to the same thing that almost everyone succumbs to, the same trap: you fall for the idea of the “Maximum City”, the chaos, the speed, the heat, the shit, the poor, the rich, all at once, the grand narrative of 17 million people forced to live on top of one another in a city held together by ingenuity, momentum and sheer force of will. You succumb to this because it’s true, to a degree, and because it’s intoxicating, and also because it’s easy. In the overwhelming face of everything it’s easy to say, “all life is here, it’s messy, and it works!” and turn a blind eye to everything else. But it gets kind of boring. And it means that other interpretations are lost.

 

If you’ve lived or worked in Mumbai in the last five or ten years you’ll have seen the beanbag graffiti: Beanbags 26407383. I saw it once and then, like a new word you learn, I saw it everywhere, on walls, houses, pipelines, metal sheets, flyovers, construction sites, waste-ground. Everywhere: Beanbags 26407383. It was, it is, the work of a beanbag salesman, who had the genius to go out and spray the city with the name of his product and a phone number, at one stroke bypassing the legal, unaffordable marketing mechanisms of the ‘official’ city springing up around him. In the city of commerce, the very fabric of the city became an advertising hoarding. And this is how he made his fortune.

 

It’s a nice story, but we were interested in something else too. We were interested in the opportunity the repeated motif provided us to look at the city with different eyes, in a different light, away from the “Maximum” view...."

 

Text : Matthew Parker
Photograph  : Zubin Pastakia

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Exhibition in Mumbai | 'The Visitor' by Nandini Valli Muthiah

Exhibition in Mumbai | 'The Visitor' by Nandini Valli Muthiah | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Artist Nandini Valli Muthiah is showcasing The Visitor, a collection of images that imagine Lord Krishna in a parallel universe with several alter egos.

 

Photo by Nandini Valli Muthiah | Article by Soma Das

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Exhibition in Mumbai | Yamini Nayar at Amrita Jhaveri Projects

Exhibition in Mumbai | Yamini Nayar at Amrita Jhaveri Projects | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"A Yamini Nayar photograph is a document of constructed moments or a visual recording of a sculpture she has carefully built and then thoughtfully destroyed. In her words, her photographs “monumentalize and memorialize the fragility and decay of the sculptures, preserve the modest and humble experiences and detritus of everyday life from which they are constructed.”

 

Image by Yamini Nayar, Interview by Rosely n D'Mello

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'Photo Finish' - Matthieu Foss Gallery closes down

'Photo Finish' - Matthieu Foss Gallery closes down | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Seven years ago, curator Matthieu Foss moved to Mumbai from Paris and became closely involved with the arts in India — more specifically, photography. One of the founders of Paris Photo, an annual photography fair held in Paris, he was no stranger to this form of art. He started working with Tasveer Arts — an organisation committed to the art of photography — managing their activities in Mumbai, but went solo soon after. Thereafter, for a brief period, he organised photography exhibitions at rented venues and eventually set up his own gallery in 2010. Matthieu Foss Gallery became the first private gallery in the city, dedicated solely to photography.

 

But now, and all too soon, the gallery hosted its last show, which ended on January 28. It will close down shortly. The reason Foss cites is the uncertainty of the market...

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Mumbai’s ‘Focus’ Festival Showcases Women Photographers

Mumbai’s ‘Focus’ Festival Showcases Women Photographers | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Yet it is often women who have collected and organized much of the history of photography in South Asia", Mr Gupta said.

“The family album is often guarded and looked after by the women, who are the repository of a family history,” said Mr. Gupta. “Similarly in India, I think a lot of women have worked in the industry end of photography, doing the research, maintaining archives and facilitating dialogues. The handful of photo-specific agencies and galleries that we know of in India were started by women.”

Photograph : Mohini Chandra
Article : Neha Thirani Bagri | NYT 

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A Photographer’s Account of Bal Thackeray’s Funeral

A Photographer’s Account of Bal Thackeray’s Funeral | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"The crowds were filing in now, small men casting long shadows that reminded me of Vincent Laforet’s aerial photographs of skaters in New York City. I shot some photos on my phone, instagrammed and tweeted those. In a few minutes they went viral. My caption for one picture was ‘This is Not Tahrir Square’, the sarcasm was missed but the photo was widely retweeted."

 

Photography and Text by Ritesh Uttamchandani | Open Magazine

More of his work on http://riteshuttamchandani.photoshelter.com

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Down memory lane with Mumbai’s acclaimed Hamilton Studios

Down memory lane with Mumbai’s acclaimed Hamilton Studios | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Mumbai’s Hamilton Studios, famous for its portraiture, turned 50 last month. Established in 1928 by Englishman Victor Sassoon, the studio is located in the heart of Ballard Estate, the city’s heritage district. Its 82-year-old owner and the only resident photographer (at one point there were 10) Ranjit Madhavji, a textile exporter who bought the studio on a whim, says that nothing much has changed in the last 50 years as far as its appearance is concerned. “I have not even got the walls repainted as I wanted to maintain the ambience of an old world studio. We have shot several celebrities within these walls,” he says. “From Madhubala to Zeenat Aman and JRD Tata, to Babasaheb Ambedkar and Wipro chairman Azim Premji, they have all come to get their portfolios clicked. I shoot only portfolio pictures and use at least 10 lights.” There have been times when he has taken one of his 20 unwieldy old cameras, which includes a Kodak 1926 Studio, a 1930 Field Camera, a Speedgraphic, a Graphlex, a Mamiaflex Professional, a Hilba and a Wilsor out of the studio to shoot people like the Dalai Lama. Deepali Nandwani gets him to blow the dust off some of the studio’s most memorable photographs...

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Exhibition in Mumbai | Rashid Rana: 'Apposite - Opposite'

Exhibition in Mumbai | Rashid Rana: 'Apposite - Opposite' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

On April 9, Rana's show will open across two galleries in Mumbai, Chemould Prescott Road and Chatterjee & Lal, his first exhibition in the city in five years. On display will be a series of works in what is now his trademark style: large photo mosaics made up of scores of tiny, seeming unrelated or contradictory individual images. One of the most provocative examples of this technique is the six-part Veil series, first exhibited at London's prestigious Saatchi Gallery and Chatterjee & Lal in Mumbai in 2007. The work showed an anonymous figure dressed in a burkha, with this larger image made up of tiny, blurred pornographic stills of women, taken from the internet. By juxtaposing the two ideas, Rana critiqued negative stereotypes of women, both the sexual objectification inherent in pornography and the stereotypical image of women from the Islamic world constructed by the media.
 

The paradoxes and duality of a larger image and its constituent smaller images have dominated Rana's artistic practice for the past decade. "Today, every image, idea and truth - whether in ancient mythology or the news of the day - encompasses its opposite within itself. We live in a state of duality," says Rana. "My works are an effort to represent this complexity and transcend the bold divisions that people create in their perceptions."
 

Thus, in Mumbai this month, Rana will exhibit works such as the Language Series, three mosaic landscapes made up of tiny photographs taken by Rana over the past two years of all kinds of text present outdoors in Lahore, such as chalk messages on walls, banners, posters and signboards. "So much of cultural, social and political history is embedded in these texts," says Rana...

Article by Riddhi Doshi | Hindustan Times 

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'A step across the threshold' by Sudharak Olwe

'A step across the threshold' by Sudharak Olwe | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"In 1993, a 15-year-old came to Bombay. A deal had been struck somewhere, a price had been put on the body, and she had been delivered from the hills of Nepal to Kamathipura, a place that does not care for a return address. For Rs 40,000, Ambika Jeroo Nepali, was bought by one of the brothels in Mumbai’s red light area. It’s a price that she repaid for the next 11 years, the first five of which her earnings went entirely to the brothel owners and pimps. She had to earn back the amount she had been sold for, before she could see any money of her own."

 

Images by Sudharak Olwe

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Naseeb: Trafficked

Naseeb: Trafficked | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"I wanted to understand the reasons for this epidemic; Why was this happening? How was it happening? And to hear of first hand experiences from the girls. I heard many stories of poverty, bad families, deception by friends and families, kidnappings and horrific experiences on trafficking routes. Sometimes the girls had left their homes of their own will, other times they were running away from violent husbands or simply in search of a better life. The stories differed but one commonality existed: they had all been deceived". Sonal Kantaria

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