Indian Photographies
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Visual Culture in the Subcontinent
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PROJECT | 'Best in Show' by Karan Vaid

PROJECT | 'Best in Show' by Karan Vaid | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Karan Vaid‘s ongoing project Best in Show captures Indian dog culture in two parts. Part 1 is a quirky look at the modern Indian dog shows: doting owners, tear-jerking moments and mysterious paraphernalia. From Patiala to Palakkad, Karan photographs what would be best described as a dog mela; brooches and spike collars, bronze plated participation medals, grooming aids and an awful lot of people talking to dogs. Part 2 is a deeply personal affair, where the photographer opens out family albums. Pictures of family, dogs past, friends and even some where you can make out a young Karan. In the India of 80s and 90s you can see the essence of the work; the bond between man and animal. A little reminiscing of childhood never goes amiss…"

Blindboys.org 

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DOCUMENTARY | Gianfranco Rosi's "Boatman" (1993)

"Shot on the Ganges River at Varanasi (formerly Benares) in northern India, a center of Hinduism, Sanskrit learning and Buddhist pilgrimage, the (correctly) black-and-white Boatman, in Hindi and English, follows boatman Gopal Maji and takes in a plethora of sights both tranquil and troubling. Directed and photographed by Eritrean-born Gianfranco Rosi, this superlative film from Italy took the prize for best documentary at Hawaii. Of current and enduring interest, along the way Hindi-Muslim tension is addressed.
     But the film’s two intertwined main themes lie elsewhere. One has to do with the contradictory nature of the Ganges: a polluted sacred river. The source of much of the pollution accounts for the other theme: the accumulation of the cremated and uncremated remains of the dead, which are routinely and ritualistically consigned to the river. All this occasions another consideration: who are permitted to employ the river for this purpose; who are even able to afford to do this. Sometimes the financially destitute cannot mark a burial with the traditional funeral pyre.
     Rosi, offscreen, asks questions of Maji and others, and all the responses become part of the fabric of the river that we are watching. Rosi establishes the river’s potent symbolism from the start—on land, by the river. He invests the camera with continuous motion through crowds of people, thereby conjuring the sense of a flowing river even before we are in Maji’s rowboat on the river. In this way, the river is associated with people’s bustling lives. Once we leave land for the river, another association accumulates: the river as embodiment of the continuity of life and death. Indeed, few films more openly address death as a part of life.
     Rosi’s film is full of fine images—for instance, the parallel rows of huge shadow-casting drumlike thingamajigs between which Maji rows and halts his boat. It turns out that these are anchors, and the image provides a powerful presentiment of death."

Dennis Grunes 

http://grunes.wordpress.com/2009/04/19/boatman-gianfranco-rosi-1993/
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Book | 'A Certain Grace', The Sidi: Indians of African Descent, by Ketaki Sheth

Book | 'A Certain Grace', The Sidi: Indians of African Descent, by Ketaki Sheth | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
Photographer Ketaki Sheth's new book is a heartfelt profile of the Sidis.
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Crowdfunding | 'Don't Breathe' by Ronny Sen

Crowdfunding | 'Don't Breathe' by Ronny Sen | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"For millions, traveling inside unreserved general compartments in Indian trains is an inescapable Indian experience. A rapidly escalating inflation has resulted in severe hikes in fuel prices in India, compelling an increasing number of people to travel in unreserved general compartments of the Indian Railways."

 

Text and Photograph by Ronny Sen

Support the project on emphas.is

http://www.emphas.is/web/guest/discoverprojects?projectID=774#7
 

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Documentary | Imaging India @ 65

Documentary | Imaging India @ 65 | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

As India turns 65, we find an interesting way to capture the complexity and the chaos of the past 6 and half decades. Through the lens of Indian photojournalists, from the 1940's to the present.

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'Jharia - Apocalypse Now' by Thomas Van Den Driessche

'Jharia - Apocalypse Now' by Thomas Van Den Driessche | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
JHARIA - APOCALYPSE NOW
#84 APOCALYPSE

 

"Ever since I was a child, I have heard that eskimos have dozens of different words to describe subtle nuances of white. When I arrived in Jharia, I couldn’t help wondering the same thing about the inhabitants of the largest mining area in India. Could these people, living litteraly on hell, have developed a special vocabulary for all the nuances of black? One thing is certain : this colour has value in their eyes. In this region they use the Hindi word, Kalaheera, which means ‘black diamond’ when talking about coal. Roughly 400,000 live in Jharia, a town near Dhanbad, the main city of the state of Jharkhand . The lunar-like soil hasn’t produced vegetation for a long time and won’t be doing so any time soon. But the danger for local inhabitants does not come from the black dust that is permanently floating in their environment. The danger is deeper and is developing under their feet in the heart of coal veins. Bad management of the mines has led to uncontrolled underground fires. For more than a century, millions of tons of coal have burnt up. It equivalent to a volcano growing under Jharia. Toxic gas vapours spread into the atmosphere, the ground is sinking and houses are starting to crack. Flames burst up by the roadside. The imminence of a human disaster is very real. The Indian government is aware of this but doesn’t seem to want to free up enough funds to relocate te population at risk. In Jharia people are not prepared to leave at any cost."

 

Photos and Text by Thomas Van Den Driessche | On Colors Magazine

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RIP Homai Vyarawalla

RIP Homai Vyarawalla | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

India’s first woman photo-journalist Homai Vyarawalla died at a private hospital here this morning at the age of 98. (...)

Born on December 9, 1913 to a Parsi family, Vyarawalla grew up in Mumbai and moved to Delhi in 1942 where she photographed events leading to Independence, as an employee of the British Information Services.

She took photographs of key events that would have a decisive impact on Indian history, including a meeting where leaders voted for the June 3 plan for India’s partition.

She also photographed the first flag hoisting ceremony at Red Fort on August 15, 1947, the departure of Lord Mountbatten from India and the funerals of Mahatma Gandhi, Jawaharlal Nehru and Lal Bahadur Shastri.

She was awarded the Padma Vibhushan in January last year.

 

(Source : PTI)

 

Link : Homai Vyarawalla, a documentary by Anik Gosh (2006)

 

 

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REVIEW | 'Love, Honour & Disobey' by Colin Pantall

REVIEW | 'Love, Honour & Disobey' by Colin Pantall | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Given an open commission to return to India to shoot a new body of work, Max Pinckers approached the Love Commandos in New Delhi, an organisation that helps couples who have fallen in love escape the threat of honour violence from their disapproving families. But, finds Colin Pantall, the result is a world away from a traditional documentary record, instead developing the approach of his previous work, using staged scenarios influenced by Bollywood cinema..."

Text by Colin Pantall.
First published in the British Journal of Photography magazine, UK, October 2013. 

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Documentary | Madan-Mahatta : the Memory Maker

"An 8 year-old boy was given a box camera instead of toys to play with and this inspired a life-long fascination of watching the world through the camera. Today, at 80, Madan Mahatta shares his passion for photography through this film. The inner world of this man of few words opens out with the help of his wife, Usha Mehta and photographer friends, Ram Rehman and Dayanita Singh, and through a historic exhibition of his work that captures the making of modern Delhi."

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Documentary | 'Let’s do Timbaktu'

Documentary | 'Let’s do Timbaktu' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"When Rintu and I founded our company, Black Ticket Films, one of our core focus areas was (and remains) to constantly challenge the way we tell our stories. So ‘form’ for us is as important as ‘content’. We’re constantly mixing media and using high-definition live-action, still photographs, archival video, graphics, music and text to build on our stories. Quite a few well-known film theorists and academics in India have asked us why our documentaries look so glossy, almost like advertisements – and in my response, I’ve always wondered why shouldn’t a documentary ‘look good’,” Sushmit says.

 
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Photo Essay | Bharat Sikka's Photographs of Bhutan

Photo Essay | Bharat Sikka's Photographs of Bhutan | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Bhutan receives fewer visitors in a year than New York City does in a day. The country's breathtaking vistas and rich culture, captured here by photographer Bharat Sikka, remain despite recent steps towards modernity.

 

LightBox | TIME.com

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ShaluSharma's comment, September 11, 2012 12:36 PM
Thank you for this. I would love to go there one day.
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'Land of a Thousand Cameras' by Naeem Mohaiemen

'Land of a Thousand Cameras' by Naeem Mohaiemen | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"As per semiotic theory, we make sense of visual phenomena in several ways: resemblance (it looks like what it is), logic (cause and effect), convention (objects that have symbolic value), and signification (the visible signifying something else altogether, although often related). What was intriguing about that "Transition" student photo portfolio was the shift away from the first element: resemblance. Very few images were what they looked like, the meaning was not immediately clear. Even the familiar city had become unmoored from landmarks. It was everywhere and nowhere. This could be the start of something different. Perhaps all this needs to be married to the fever dream embedded within those earlier, bucolic images..."

Text by Naeem Mohaiemen | The Daily Star 

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Tata City by Thomas Van Den Driessche

Tata City by Thomas Van Den Driessche | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Tata Stadium, Tata Football Academy, Tata Amusement Park, Tata Center For Excellence, Tata School… In Jamshedpur, the historic headquarters of India’s largest industrial group, everything seems “Tata branded”.

Photographs by Thomas Van Den Driessche,
On LaLettreDeLaPhotographie.com 

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