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Indian Photographies
Visual Culture in the Subcontinent
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TALK | Global Photography Now: The Indian Sub-Continent @ Tate

TALK | Global Photography Now: The Indian Sub-Continent @ Tate | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Internationally acclaimed artists Shezad Dawood, Hasan Elahi, Ram Rahman and the Raqs Media Collective discuss the impact of speed, technology, mass media and economic power on their photographic practice, and the reality of residing within one of the world’s fastest expanding economies. The session is chaired by critic and curator Gayatri Sinha. Part of Global Photography Now."

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'In Confrontation With The Apparent' : An Interview of Swapan Parekh

'In Confrontation With The Apparent' : An Interview of Swapan Parekh | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"What do you men by photographic reflex ?

It’s an ‘Instant Evaluation’ based on years of seeing and experiencing while shooting. That instant when the inside and outside align and actually make one want to press the shutter. Your current state of knowledge and cumulative memory-bank, largely decides this split second capture of a visual configuration. It’s what leads to your distinct visual brew. It’s how you shoot, what you shoot. And it’s not only about what you include, but also what you deliberately choose to exclude in your final moment of release."

 

Photograph © Swapan Parekh

Interview by Mank Katyal and Marukh Budhraja | Emaho Magazine

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Exhibition in Delhi | 'The Calcutta Diaries' by Pablo Bartholomew

Exhibition in Delhi | 'The Calcutta Diaries' by Pablo Bartholomew | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
“I have photographed what was around me and still do. Journeys were made then and they continue even now. So, I have always recorded what was around me and intrigued me. The engagement was very simple—to look, to see, and to capture; to fill some voids that were created in the past and remain even now. In some ways it has been a form of therapy and sometimes a shield. And in our family, we lived our lives and recorded them, and if now some of it has become ‘history’ then so be it. We all make up our own language as we go along. The archive is a reservoir of this language, and it needs to undergo a constant process of re-engagement and re-assessment, in the same way that language changes and evolves over time. This is what archives are for me. They are the guardians of our memories. Calcutta is still a city that is held by time. I felt it more when I went to visit my grandmother as a child, and it still held that resonance when I went on to the sets of Shatranj Ke Khiladi . So, when I was photographing it, it was not about nostalgia as it may seem like now. Perhaps, with the passage of some more time it may become history. It is all about transitions and time—story becomes myth, myth becomes legend.”


Photograph and words by Pablo Bartholomew

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Abhishek Poddar on the Landscape of Contemporary Photography in India

Abhishek Poddar on the Landscape of Contemporary Photography in India | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Amongst so many galleries around today, we needed to be clear about how we define and differentiate ourselves. Tasveer's relationship to photography is perhaps different from the other organisations that are Involved with art and photography that exist in India. Tasveer's contribution has been as a commercial gallery, and one that tries to encourage both the promotion and also the sale of photographs in India. These concepts are intrinsically linked, and both have therefore gone some way to defining the identity and motivation of Tasveer over the years. I 'll attempt to briefly and simply about the history of the photography market and how this relates to India, followed by an outline of a few of the ways in which Tasveer tries to do more than just sell and exhibit photographs, and how we are also, to the best of our ability, trying to contribute to the wonderful and fast evolving landscape of photography in India..."

Text by Abhishek Poddar | The Arts Trust

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Interview | Artist Hajra Waheed On “Sea Change”, her India Debut Solo

Interview | Artist Hajra Waheed On “Sea Change”, her India Debut Solo | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"As children, most of us spent a large amount of time getting acquainted with our imagined realities. We developed grand vocabularies around these alternate places and people and narratives, and at times, even invited our friends in to explore these intimate spaces with us. I suppose in some ways I never stopped developing stories from that very place. Of course, my narratives have matured (at least I would hope so!) and are deeply influenced by my many lived experiences traversing borders, or rather, living among them. So many of us who live along these lines (either by choice or force) do go missing or disappear at times, just to re-emerge later. I am fascinated by those who — yes, dare to journey across the borders they once built for themselves. It takes courage to do so, to leave what you know in order to better understand what you don’t. “Sea Change” begins to explore the narratives around this very migration — one that is as much physical as it is psychological and/or emotional."


Work by Hajra Waheed
Interview by Rosalyn D'Mello | ArtInfo 

khicṛī's insight:

A show not to be missed, at Kolkata's Experimenter's Gallery

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Interview | Eye of the beholder: Pushpamala N

Interview | Eye of the beholder: Pushpamala N | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Pushpamala N (born in 1965) is a Bangalore based photography and video performance artist. Starting out as a sculptor with an interest in narrative figuration, Pushpamala N eventually took to casting her own body as various characters and personae in the medium of photo-performance. Interested in exploring photography as a medium of narrative fiction, she drew heavily from the history and traditions of cinema for her work. Recently she has also been using experimental short films, live performances and sculptural tableaux to explore the ideas that fascinate her. In this interview she talks about the synergy between movies and photographs, takes us into the fantastical and intriguing world of her art, discusses her work and traces its roots in cinema, explains her oeuvre that stands firmly in the middle-ground between film and photography and tells us that, in India, cinema and photography both created and recorded the country’s modernity."

 

Photograph by Pushpamal N | The Big Indian Picture

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Photo Essay | 'Beanbags' by Zubin Pastakia

Photo Essay | 'Beanbags' by Zubin Pastakia | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Mumbai can drive you crazy. And because (or, perhaps, despite) of this, you want to make sense of it. You want to make some kind of order out of it. And more often than not, in trying to create order, you succumb to the same thing that almost everyone succumbs to, the same trap: you fall for the idea of the “Maximum City”, the chaos, the speed, the heat, the shit, the poor, the rich, all at once, the grand narrative of 17 million people forced to live on top of one another in a city held together by ingenuity, momentum and sheer force of will. You succumb to this because it’s true, to a degree, and because it’s intoxicating, and also because it’s easy. In the overwhelming face of everything it’s easy to say, “all life is here, it’s messy, and it works!” and turn a blind eye to everything else. But it gets kind of boring. And it means that other interpretations are lost.

 

If you’ve lived or worked in Mumbai in the last five or ten years you’ll have seen the beanbag graffiti: Beanbags 26407383. I saw it once and then, like a new word you learn, I saw it everywhere, on walls, houses, pipelines, metal sheets, flyovers, construction sites, waste-ground. Everywhere: Beanbags 26407383. It was, it is, the work of a beanbag salesman, who had the genius to go out and spray the city with the name of his product and a phone number, at one stroke bypassing the legal, unaffordable marketing mechanisms of the ‘official’ city springing up around him. In the city of commerce, the very fabric of the city became an advertising hoarding. And this is how he made his fortune.

 

It’s a nice story, but we were interested in something else too. We were interested in the opportunity the repeated motif provided us to look at the city with different eyes, in a different light, away from the “Maximum” view...."

 

Text : Matthew Parker
Photograph  : Zubin Pastakia

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"Darkling I Listen" : Photography Freed from the Limitations of Sight

"Darkling I Listen" : Photography Freed from the Limitations of Sight | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"It struck me at once that this exhibition was almost free of visual clichés. None of the stock-in-trade of “Indian photography” — Cartier-Bresson’s decisive moments, Antoine D’Agata’s sexy shakes, Raghu Rai’s picturesque compositions — was to be seen in these photographs. We often respond to a photograph because it subliminally reminds us of another, more famous, photograph, painting or film-still. And, if we are not careful, this derivativeness, unthinking and automatic, determines the way we compose photographs, fantasies and memories. But the inner and outer lives of the blind are spared the inescapable clutter of readymade visual experience — or could it be that there are clichéd sounds, textures and smells that take their place? Somehow, it is difficult to think of clichés in spheres other than the verbal and the visual — which, in itself, is worth thinking about if we are worrying about the ubiquity of clichés.

 

The uncluttered quality of these photographs by the blind suggests a mode of vision that seems to have shed the burden of information and illustration. “This is my sight, detail-less,” says a wall-text by one of the partially sighted photographers in the show. So, as an experiment in a similar spirit, I decided to write this piece without providing any information about the gallery, photographers’ names, locations and even images from the show — not to mystify or tease by withholding facts, but to focus the reader’s attention on ideas and processes, instead of distracting him with names, places, dates and other specifications. I wondered, too, if ‘documentary’ photography could be freed, in certain cases, from the imperatives of context and information and taken towards a different order of vision, knowledge and value. And does this falling away of detail — not the details of texture or grain, but of information — make photography move closer to art?..."

 

Article by Aveek Sen | The Telegraph

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Aveek Sen on Raghu Rai : 'Capture Everthing'

Aveek Sen on Raghu Rai : 'Capture Everthing' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"... Rai confesses to Geoffrey Ward, in the introduction to this book, that he wants to “capture everything”. This desire produces another compositional formula in Rai’s photography: the deliberately flattened human, animal and architectural panorama of the ghats seen from the river during the bathing hour. It gives to the eye—in a single movement from one end of a double-page photograph to the other—nothing less than everything that a “decisive moment” can hold. But such a ‘chaosmos’ of colourful simultaneity becomes a dil-maange-more version of Cartier-Bresson in Rai, whose double-spreads give you at least three decisive moments for the price of one within the conventional rectangle of documentary photography. In one black-and-white photograph, between a man squatting in a lungi on the left and another fingering his own prepuce in kurta-pajama on the right, we are given an amusing array of postures, gestures, expressions, clothes, hand movements and gazes to dwell on. And this horizontal inclusiveness is generously replicated in different settings—though bathing and burning are what human bodies are mostly seen doing in Varanasi..."

 

Photograph by Raghu Rai

Article by Aveek Sen |The Caravan

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Exhibition at NGMA | 'Project Cinema City'

Exhibition at NGMA | 'Project Cinema City' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Organised by the National Gallery of Modern Art and Ministry of Culture to commemorate 100 years of Indian cinema, Project Cinema City brings together more than 20 artists, designers, technicians and architects in a collaborative show that excavates the connections between the Hindi film industry and the city of Bombay/Bambai/Mumbai, which is both the real-life site of its birth and the imaginary locale where so many of its narratives unfold.

The traits of urban modernity—anonymity, artifice, technology, speed—are echoed in our experience of cinema. Project Cinema City contains several art works that draw on these connections, inviting us to enter a space of fantasy that’s as much about the excitement and frisson of the city as it is about the pleasures of the cinematic. The first of these is a collaborative audio-visual piece that involves a series of women talking of the experience of watching films. One woman talks of how she missed out on a family expedition to the first air-conditioned theatre (Liberty) to show a Hindi film, yet another reminisces about the women of the family doing ‘full-make-up’ in the cinema bathroom so that they were actually late for the movie.... "

 

Photo : 'Fearless Nadia to the Rescue", a frame from 'Return of the Phantom Lady' by Pushpamala N.

 

Article by Trisha Gupta | Open Magazine

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Featured Artist | Bani Abidi

Featured Artist | Bani Abidi | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Artist : Bani Abidi

Title : Pari Wania, 7:42 pm, 22 August 2008, Ramadan, Karachi
Date(s) : 2009
Dimensions : 50.8 x 76.2 cms
Material : Duratrans Lightbox
Website : www.greencardamom.net
Credit : Courtesy Green Cardamom and the artist

 

"..Karachi Series 1 is an exploration of the place of religious minorities in a public environment not known for its acceptance of difference. During the month of Ramadan, at sunset, (in August at roughly 7.45pm) the time when Muslims break their fast, the streets of Karachi are deserted. By venturing into the street and performing everyday tasks in public, Abidi’s non-Muslim subjects reclaim a time and a place where their status as equal citizens in metropolitan Karachi is not contested..."

 

Bani Abidi’s videos, photographic works and drawings use elements of performance and orchestration to explore the processes of political history, popular imagination and identity formation. Abidi was born in Karachi in 1971, and currently lives between New Delhi and Karachi.

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Books | Richard Bartholomew, The Art Critic : An insider's account of the birth of Modern Indian Art

Books | Richard Bartholomew, The Art Critic : An insider's account of the birth of Modern Indian Art | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Featuring over 250 illustrations and including an extensive selection of never-before-seen black-and-white photographs by Richard documenting the art scene, The Art Critic is an absolute essential for art lovers and enthusiasts keen on an insider’s account of the untold story of Modern Indian Art.

 

Archive Editors: Rati Bartholomew • Carmen Kagal • Pablo Bartholomew

Introduction by Geeta Kapur

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St.ART Delhi | Delhi’s Street Art Festival

St.ART Delhi | Delhi’s Street Art Festival | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

An ongoing street festival in New Delhi is transforming the bare walls of the city into a walk-in art gallery. In pictures.

 

By Aditi Malhotra and Enrico Fabian | @WSJIndia

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Exhibition at Clark House Initiative, Bombay | 'Visual Evidence'

Exhibition at Clark House Initiative, Bombay | 'Visual Evidence' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"The exhibition from the Clark House curatorial archive gives credence to a trajectory of art historical scholarship, from Partha Mitter to Jyotindra Jain and Tapati Guha-Thakurta, who subtly interpreted the collapse of visual iconographies of nationalism, fundamentalism, and religious pantheons. The exhibition plays with the chronologies of mediums gaining popularity in India, as put forward by writers like Girish Shahane, from the hand-painted photograph to paintings inspired by photo-journalism, and anachronistically, later by the European Renaissance. The exhibition is also a careful look at a mixture of styles within works: where hunted deer, or fighter planes stylistically differ from the pastoral landscapes that surround them. Toying with calibrations of what has been previously debated, the exhibition adds new iconographies into the fray, from lesser known contemporaries of the better known studios."

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Interview with Dayanita Singh | "The Eunuch is the New Maharaja"

Interview with Dayanita Singh | "The Eunuch is the New Maharaja" | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

 

"A.S.: In some of the works in Go Away Closer, there seems to be a tendency to create drama out of visual patterns and their behaviour. I refer here to works that create an effect out of presenting objects stacked in a uniform manner - chairs lined up in regular rows in a cinema theatre or in a room, scooters arranged in a warehouse, gloves hanging limp on window bars. Do you feel that as much as one needs to explore the hypnotic quality that repetition as a trope possesses (the incantatory effect that words can achieve and the spectacular effect that objects can), one has also to be aware of the dangers of it being used in a manner that is formulaic?

D.S.: Of course, there is a danger there. If you are seeing a pattern and not the emotion that I am seeing in these photographs, then, it is something that I need to take very seriously. I would definitely not want my work to be dominated by a sense of pattern. There is a kind of conditioning that comes out of practice, thought, and participation. A moment compels me to pull the trigger and take the picture - I respond intuitively. Rather than consciously, with an idea in my head. Perhaps, too often, we are conditioned to think of the photogenic and the photographeable. Some of my latest works look at capturing that which is not photographeable. And that which is not traditionally photogenic.

How you capture an image depends on your instinct - the way you allow your experiences to shape the act. What you draw on could be from literature, from music, from cinema, from life. As well as from your understanding of the medium. Take light, for example, the very basic element of Photography. I am very conscious of light even when I am not photographing. How it falls, how it fills up a space. Where it lingers. Light in complete darkness, etc.

There are images I have taken recently which have stayed on for sentimental reasons. Images I made because I had to, for my own sake, or just because I wanted to share a view with someone. Myself Mona Ahmed (2001) was born out of my admiration for Mona - the tough life she has led, the choices she has made over the years. Quite a few years ago, there could be no shows of Indian art/photography without pictures of maharajas; then, of course, over time, urban family portraits took over. Now, you have to have images of eunuchs if you are mounting a show, especially internationally. The Eunuch is the new Maharaja. It's amazing how fast certain themes become stereotypes."

 

Interview by Abhay Sardesai | ARTINDIA

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Chobi Mela VII | Interview of Shahidul Alam

Chobi Mela VII | Interview of Shahidul Alam | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

I personally think pretty much all the arts benefit from people who work in the periphery, in the edges. I think photography has lot to gain from people outside the field of photography, in terms of what they have to offer, how they can contribute to the medium and Chobi Mela always encourages that interaction. It’s been a very fluid border in movement and direction. I think certainly the fact that this is a festival where fine art photography, conceptual work, documentary work, 3D work, whatever, gets space is one of the things that makes it so rich. It’s not so predictable. Every year it is different. And I think every year it is evolving...."

Interview by Munem Wasif | Le Journal de la Photographie

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Indian Art Fair | 'So much for stereotypes'

Indian Art Fair | 'So much for stereotypes' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

“I’m puzzled by the way you hang on to stereotypes of the rest and the west – aren’t we beyond that now?". 

The question, raised by a member of the audience at the Speaker’s Forum at the India Art Fair in Delhi last week, was a response to papers – notably by Spanish art historian Estrella de Diego – that had critiqued the west-centric bias of an art world where a show at an institution such as Tate or MoMA is still required if an artist is to be taken seriously on the global stage. Such injustices are inarguably present. Yet in Delhi last week, both within the fair and in the city beyond, artists overturned cultural stereotypes with imagination, intellect and joie de vivre. Meanwhile the presence of the likes of Tate, MoMA and the Art Institute of Chicago reminded us that those museums need artists from afar just as much as artists need their approval (...)


Work : 'Frida Sits on Double Pepsi’ (2013) by Pakpoom Silaphan, at Scream Gallery ;
Article by Rachel Spence | FT.com

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Exhibition in Delhi at Exhibit 320 | 'Postcards from the Interior'

Exhibition in Delhi at Exhibit 320 | 'Postcards from the Interior' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Indigenous Americans once believed that when a photograph was taken, it stole a piece of the person’s soul. Similar to mirrors, which many cultures regarded as reservoirs of our ‘selves’ and hence felt, if broken, would bring ill luck and disquiet. These beliefs function as powerful metaphors for how images define us—our physical borders, the individual arrangement of our features, and our identity in terms of our differences with others. Recently, Alex Parker, a London-based amateur photographer, took pictures of himself standing with one other person or another—a friend, acquaintance or stranger. He titled the series Me. Tanvi Mishra, a Delhi-based freelance photographer and debut curator, has orchestrated a similarly intimate exhibition, one that gazes at the lives of others, whether it be the artist or his or her subject.A startlingly talented group of photographers explores the theme of self and identity through an intensely personal lens"

Photograph by Ankit Goyal

Article by Janice Pariat | Open Magazine 

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Exhibition at Photoink Gallery | Kashmir by Amit Mehra

Exhibition at Photoink Gallery | Kashmir by Amit Mehra | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

It’s a photograph of a hotel. Once a thriving, buzzing hotel in Gulmarg, now empty and silent. The picture is taken through a window. The next image is that of a boy with flutes in the foreground, also through a window. A tailor, also seen through a window, examines a needle and thread. Through a door, a window, or barbed wire—each picture has been captured from a distance; perhaps a distance as great as the Kashmiri reality is from the rest of the country.

 

Photograph by Amit Mehra

Article by Shreya Ray | LiveMint

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Exhibition at Nature Morte, Delhi | JJ Valaya: “Decoded Paradox” and "the Soul in the Space"

Exhibition at Nature Morte, Delhi | JJ Valaya: “Decoded Paradox” and "the Soul in the Space" | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Nature Morte is pleased to present a series of photographs by the renowned fashion designer JJ Valaya. Mr. Valaya’s first foray into professional photography was with the exhibition “Decoded Paradox,” presented in Delhi in January 2011 and Mumbai in February 2011. The series presented personalities of New Delhi in costumes of Mr. Valaya’s design in a diverse array of locations, some historical, some contemporary. The resulting black-and-white photographs, highly accomplished in their technical aspects, articulated the peculiar combination of elements that typifies India today.

 

Mr. Valaya’s second series of photographic works is both more abstract and more personal. The focus of “The Soul in the Space” is on details of architecture shot in three locations that connect with his own biography: Jodhpur (the city of his birth), Chandigarh (the city where he was raised), and Dufftown, Scotland (where he first discovered architectural photography during an artist’s residency). With the precise eye of an accomplished designer, Mr. Valaya concentrates on mass, line and texture in both black-and-white and color works, composing starkly dynamic scenarios that approximate a painterly aesthetic but also unmoor the subjects from their original contexts. The prints on view will range from large-scale blow-ups that communicate a monumental grandeur to sets of smaller prints that are grouped together, creating syncopated rhythms. Mr. Valaya’s palette is purposefully reductive yet still highly sumptuous, relishing the chromatic nuances to be discovered in stone, metal and concrete.

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7 Days in Delhi : 7 films 7 artists 7 locations

7 Days in Delhi : 7 films 7 artists 7 locations | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

In 7 days Third Ear’s Miriam Nielsen met 7 visual artists from the hyped and happening Indian art scene in Delhi.

The works of these artists comment on and interact with the city directly - which is why she asked them to take her to 7 locations in Delhi – to the places that inspire them.

 

Gigi Scaria places sculptures in transitional spaces in the city and photographs them. Sarnath Banerjee uses the hustlers that hang out in central Delhi as the characters in his graphic novels. B.L.O.T create stop motion animations out of the rich visual fabric of Old Delhi. Aastha Chauhan engages local people in a suburban part of the city in her radio programmes and community projects. Pushpamala N takes us to her “dress-wallah” where she buys costumes and backdrops for her shoots. Rohini Devashers videos and drawings are inspired by science and astronomy. She takes us to the Jantar Mantar an astronomical observatory from 1724 located in New Delhi. Vivan Sundaram creates works out of garbage, with the trash collectors who live at the periphery of the city.

Each of them open our eyes to this fast changing city, and its vibrant art scene.

 

Credits :
Directed and photographed by Miriam Nielsen, Sound by Tim Hinman, Edited by Michael Aaglund, Music by B.L.O.T and others.

 

http://thirdear.dk/7days/

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Exhibition at PhotoInk, Delhi | 'Chandigarh: Portrait of a City' by Manuel Bougot

Exhibition at PhotoInk, Delhi | 'Chandigarh: Portrait of a City' by Manuel Bougot | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Manuel Bougot’s interest in Le Corbusier’s architecture began in the 1980s when he worked on Caroline Maniaque’s thesis in architecture – on the Jaoul Houses, built in 1954, in Neuilly, France. From 2006 onwards, Bogout renewed his interest in Le Corbusier, attending talks on Chandigarh and photographed the only building the architect ever built for himself – a cabanon (a summer cabin) in Roquebrune-Cap-Martin. The desire to photograph Chandigarh thus became imperative to further any understanding of Le Corbusier, the urban designer, and his philosophy about architecture and modernism."

 

Photograph by Manuel Bougot.

Article from Platform Mag.

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ShaluSharma's comment, September 18, 2012 5:59 AM
Interesting one.
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Interview | Riyas Komu on the upcoming Kochi-Muziris Biennale

Interview | Riyas Komu on the upcoming Kochi-Muziris Biennale | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Last year India participated in the Venice Biennale for the first time and the most recent edition of Delhi’s India Art Fair (2012), attracted 85,000 visitors; contemporary Indian art is being exhibited and sold all over the world. Later this year sees the launch of a new biennale and the first to ever occur in India, the Kochi-Muziris Biennale, which is co-curated by its founders, Bose Krishnamachari and Riyas Komu. Opening on 12 December and running until 13 March, the biennale will welcome 80 artists from the MENASA regions and beyond. Riyas Komu, talked to Isabella Ellaheh Hughes."

 

Photo by Dheeraj Thakur : One of the potential venues for the biennale, a former bank on the waterfront, Calvetti area of Kochi

 

Article by Isabella Ellaheh Hughes | Frieze

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Exhibition in Mumbai | 'The Visitor' by Nandini Valli Muthiah

Exhibition in Mumbai | 'The Visitor' by Nandini Valli Muthiah | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Artist Nandini Valli Muthiah is showcasing The Visitor, a collection of images that imagine Lord Krishna in a parallel universe with several alter egos.

 

Photo by Nandini Valli Muthiah | Article by Soma Das

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