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Indian Photographies
Visual Culture in the Subcontinent
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PROJECT | 'Best in Show' by Karan Vaid

PROJECT | 'Best in Show' by Karan Vaid | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Karan Vaid‘s ongoing project Best in Show captures Indian dog culture in two parts. Part 1 is a quirky look at the modern Indian dog shows: doting owners, tear-jerking moments and mysterious paraphernalia. From Patiala to Palakkad, Karan photographs what would be best described as a dog mela; brooches and spike collars, bronze plated participation medals, grooming aids and an awful lot of people talking to dogs. Part 2 is a deeply personal affair, where the photographer opens out family albums. Pictures of family, dogs past, friends and even some where you can make out a young Karan. In the India of 80s and 90s you can see the essence of the work; the bond between man and animal. A little reminiscing of childhood never goes amiss…"

Blindboys.org 

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TALK | Global Photography Now: The Indian Sub-Continent @ Tate

TALK | Global Photography Now: The Indian Sub-Continent @ Tate | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Internationally acclaimed artists Shezad Dawood, Hasan Elahi, Ram Rahman and the Raqs Media Collective discuss the impact of speed, technology, mass media and economic power on their photographic practice, and the reality of residing within one of the world’s fastest expanding economies. The session is chaired by critic and curator Gayatri Sinha. Part of Global Photography Now."

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REVIEW | 'Love, Honour & Disobey' by Colin Pantall

REVIEW | 'Love, Honour & Disobey' by Colin Pantall | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Given an open commission to return to India to shoot a new body of work, Max Pinckers approached the Love Commandos in New Delhi, an organisation that helps couples who have fallen in love escape the threat of honour violence from their disapproving families. But, finds Colin Pantall, the result is a world away from a traditional documentary record, instead developing the approach of his previous work, using staged scenarios influenced by Bollywood cinema..."

Text by Colin Pantall.
First published in the British Journal of Photography magazine, UK, October 2013. 

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Feature | 'Vez & Me' by Tenzing Dakpa

Feature | 'Vez & Me' by Tenzing Dakpa | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Tenzing’s photo series called Vez & Me took seven years to complete. It aptly documents the personal and professional journey of an artist in the making.
Photograph by Tenzing Dakpa

Article by Priyanka Chharia | Better Photography

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'In Confrontation With The Apparent' : An Interview of Swapan Parekh

'In Confrontation With The Apparent' : An Interview of Swapan Parekh | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"What do you men by photographic reflex ?

It’s an ‘Instant Evaluation’ based on years of seeing and experiencing while shooting. That instant when the inside and outside align and actually make one want to press the shutter. Your current state of knowledge and cumulative memory-bank, largely decides this split second capture of a visual configuration. It’s what leads to your distinct visual brew. It’s how you shoot, what you shoot. And it’s not only about what you include, but also what you deliberately choose to exclude in your final moment of release."

 

Photograph © Swapan Parekh

Interview by Mank Katyal and Marukh Budhraja | Emaho Magazine

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Exhibition at Clark House Initiative, Bombay | 'Visual Evidence'

Exhibition at Clark House Initiative, Bombay | 'Visual Evidence' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"The exhibition from the Clark House curatorial archive gives credence to a trajectory of art historical scholarship, from Partha Mitter to Jyotindra Jain and Tapati Guha-Thakurta, who subtly interpreted the collapse of visual iconographies of nationalism, fundamentalism, and religious pantheons. The exhibition plays with the chronologies of mediums gaining popularity in India, as put forward by writers like Girish Shahane, from the hand-painted photograph to paintings inspired by photo-journalism, and anachronistically, later by the European Renaissance. The exhibition is also a careful look at a mixture of styles within works: where hunted deer, or fighter planes stylistically differ from the pastoral landscapes that surround them. Toying with calibrations of what has been previously debated, the exhibition adds new iconographies into the fray, from lesser known contemporaries of the better known studios."

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Abhishek Poddar on the Landscape of Contemporary Photography in India

Abhishek Poddar on the Landscape of Contemporary Photography in India | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Amongst so many galleries around today, we needed to be clear about how we define and differentiate ourselves. Tasveer's relationship to photography is perhaps different from the other organisations that are Involved with art and photography that exist in India. Tasveer's contribution has been as a commercial gallery, and one that tries to encourage both the promotion and also the sale of photographs in India. These concepts are intrinsically linked, and both have therefore gone some way to defining the identity and motivation of Tasveer over the years. I 'll attempt to briefly and simply about the history of the photography market and how this relates to India, followed by an outline of a few of the ways in which Tasveer tries to do more than just sell and exhibit photographs, and how we are also, to the best of our ability, trying to contribute to the wonderful and fast evolving landscape of photography in India..."

Text by Abhishek Poddar | The Arts Trust

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Koodankulam: A Nuclear Plant in My Backyard | Photo Essay by Amirtharaj Stephen

Koodankulam: A Nuclear Plant in My Backyard | Photo Essay by Amirtharaj Stephen | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"I come from a village called kavalkinaru in tirunelveli district of tamil nadu, not very far from kanniyakumari. my father was employed at a heavy water plant in tuticorin and i spent the first 24 years of my life in the atomic energy township there. i was always told by the people in my township that nuclear energy was safe and that it was the future. I believed them..."

 

Photograph and text by Amirtharaj Stephen

 

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Archives | 'Past continuous'

Archives | 'Past continuous' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"For a nation that constantly references and rewrites its past, we have a shocking lack of affinity towards its documentation. As Rahman points out, all our museums are a legacy of the British need to document their conquests; prior to which, in India, it was the ruling elite or the temples that were the repositories of art or artefacts. The Indian attitude towards preservation of records is best depicted by Dayanita Singh’s 2011 photographic series File Room in which bundles of folders are piled up in tottering shelves. Fading oral traditions, given priority over written ones, have ensured there are even fewer methods of preservation open to us."

 

Photograph : Habib Rahman/Courtesy Ram Rahman. Danseuse Indrani Rahman, late 1950s, the image is now part of the New York Public Library. 

 

Text by Gyatri Jayaraman | Livemint

 

 

 
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Interview | Shahidul Alam, "The Empty Frame"

Interview | Shahidul Alam, "The Empty Frame" | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
In the world of photography, Shahidul Alam needs no introduction. He started as a photographer of children, and went on to make a substantial contribution to the medium and its practice not just in his country, Bangladesh, but in the Subcontinent. He set up a photography school, Pathshala, in conjunction with the World Press Photo educational initiative. And he was instrumental in starting Asia’s very first photo festival, Chobi Mela, which attracts the world’s top professionals. In this conversation, he tells Open why the Indian photography movement lags others’, and how Bangladeshi photographers have finally quit cloning his work.

Photograph and Interview by Ronny Sen | Open Magazine
khicṛī's insight:

Very Interesting article in which Shahidul Alam point out the importance of visual literacy, not only for photographers, but also for the professionals who surround them : " We do not have writers on photography at all, we don’t have good curators, we don’t have picture researchers, we don’t have good photo editors, we don’t have good agencies, agents for photographers. These all have to be in place for the medium and for the professional industry to be robust, sustainable and creatively vibrant."

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Mario Pires's curator insight, December 19, 2012 4:13 AM

In is introduction to the article he curated, khicṛī's talks about the importance of visual literacy in India, and that made me think about the situation in Portugal, where the problems are somehow similar to the ones described in the article.

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7 Days in Delhi : 7 films 7 artists 7 locations

7 Days in Delhi : 7 films 7 artists 7 locations | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

In 7 days Third Ear’s Miriam Nielsen met 7 visual artists from the hyped and happening Indian art scene in Delhi.

The works of these artists comment on and interact with the city directly - which is why she asked them to take her to 7 locations in Delhi – to the places that inspire them.

 

Gigi Scaria places sculptures in transitional spaces in the city and photographs them. Sarnath Banerjee uses the hustlers that hang out in central Delhi as the characters in his graphic novels. B.L.O.T create stop motion animations out of the rich visual fabric of Old Delhi. Aastha Chauhan engages local people in a suburban part of the city in her radio programmes and community projects. Pushpamala N takes us to her “dress-wallah” where she buys costumes and backdrops for her shoots. Rohini Devashers videos and drawings are inspired by science and astronomy. She takes us to the Jantar Mantar an astronomical observatory from 1724 located in New Delhi. Vivan Sundaram creates works out of garbage, with the trash collectors who live at the periphery of the city.

Each of them open our eyes to this fast changing city, and its vibrant art scene.

 

Credits :
Directed and photographed by Miriam Nielsen, Sound by Tim Hinman, Edited by Michael Aaglund, Music by B.L.O.T and others.

 

http://thirdear.dk/7days/

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Aveek Sen on Raghu Rai : 'Capture Everthing'

Aveek Sen on Raghu Rai : 'Capture Everthing' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"... Rai confesses to Geoffrey Ward, in the introduction to this book, that he wants to “capture everything”. This desire produces another compositional formula in Rai’s photography: the deliberately flattened human, animal and architectural panorama of the ghats seen from the river during the bathing hour. It gives to the eye—in a single movement from one end of a double-page photograph to the other—nothing less than everything that a “decisive moment” can hold. But such a ‘chaosmos’ of colourful simultaneity becomes a dil-maange-more version of Cartier-Bresson in Rai, whose double-spreads give you at least three decisive moments for the price of one within the conventional rectangle of documentary photography. In one black-and-white photograph, between a man squatting in a lungi on the left and another fingering his own prepuce in kurta-pajama on the right, we are given an amusing array of postures, gestures, expressions, clothes, hand movements and gazes to dwell on. And this horizontal inclusiveness is generously replicated in different settings—though bathing and burning are what human bodies are mostly seen doing in Varanasi..."

 

Photograph by Raghu Rai

Article by Aveek Sen |The Caravan

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Publication | 'Aperture and Identity', Early Photography in India

Publication | 'Aperture and Identity', Early Photography in India | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

This exceptional 2009 magazine volume from Marg brings together a number of essays by new researchers. Much of the material and many writers are with the Alkazi Collection of Photography, which even supplied images for the beautiful ads. This is the first volume in a new thematic format by India's 60 year old Marg.

 

Particularly interesting are the two essays which cover albums, one by Lady Canning, the wife of an early Viceroy, and the other by the photographer Robert Gill. By Deepthi Sasidharan and Divia Patel respectively, they show how rich albums as scholarly topics can be. In an age when so many albums have been taken apart to sell single images, this is refreshing and very rewarding.

Another interesting essay, by Shuddhabrata Sengupta, contrasts the spectacular images of Kashmir with what is known, textually, about the miserable living conditions of the population.

Other important contributors include Rahaab Allana, Christopher Pinney, Pramod Kumar K.G. on the newly available photo-archive in Jaipur, and Sharada Dwivedi on Bombay panoramas. Neat things like re-photography of a Beato Lucknow panorama, and an interview with the owner of the prominent Mahatta Studio in Srinagar and Delhi make this a full featured contribution to Raj photography.

 

Edited by Rahaab Allana.

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PROJECT | 'Kitchen Gods' by Priya Kambli

PROJECT | 'Kitchen Gods' by Priya Kambli | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
One of my most startling early childhood memories is of finding one of my father’s painstakingly composed family photographs pierced by my mother. She cut holes in them so as to completely obliterate her own face while not harming the image of my sister and myself beside her. Even as a child I was aware that this act was quite significant - but what it signified was beyond my ability to decipher. As an adult I continue to be disturbed by these artifacts, which not only encompass the photographer’s hand but also the subject’s fingerprints. Even though her incisions have a violent quality to them, as an image-maker I am aesthetically drawn by the physical mark, its presence and its careful placement. These marred artifacts have formed a reference point for my new body of work, Kitchen Gods, but they do not limit the form my own work takes. I am fascinated by how my mother’s physical mark complicates the read of an otherwise mundane family photographs. In this body of work like my mother, I alter the family photographs to modify the stories they tell.

www.priyakambli.com

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Photo Essay | 'Performing Politics' by Mahesh Shantaram

Photo Essay | 'Performing Politics' by Mahesh Shantaram | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Interested in experiencing first hand the political frenzy surrounding the sixteenth Lok Sabha elections, Mahesh Shantaram packed his bags and went on a cross country trip in March 2014, following the election trail. Mapping the charged political landscape of the country through the lens of his camera, he not only documents the spectacle of democracy, but also reveals it in its making..."

Photographs by Mahesh Shantaram
Text by Shilpa Vijayakrishnan |Tasveer

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Interview | S. Paul, 'The Sage'

Interview | S. Paul, 'The Sage' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
At the age of 84, S Paul, the man who shaped Indian photojournalism, still takes his camera out for a daily shoot

An Article by Ritesh Uttamchandani | OPEN Magazine

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Documentary | Madan-Mahatta : the Memory Maker

"An 8 year-old boy was given a box camera instead of toys to play with and this inspired a life-long fascination of watching the world through the camera. Today, at 80, Madan Mahatta shares his passion for photography through this film. The inner world of this man of few words opens out with the help of his wife, Usha Mehta and photographer friends, Ram Rehman and Dayanita Singh, and through a historic exhibition of his work that captures the making of modern Delhi."

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Of Misery and Glory

Of Misery and Glory | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

The story of two photographers, Raghu Rai and Kishor Parekh, and their books on the birth of Bangladesh

Article : Elizabeth Kuruvilla | Open Magazine 

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Interview | Film Director Kamal Swaroop

Interview | Film Director Kamal Swaroop | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Film director Kamal Swaroop has been involved for the last 20 years in rehabilitating the figure of Dadasaheb Phalke in diverse ingenious ways. Here, he talks to Abhay Sardesai about entering the portals of history and communing with ghosts from the past."

Interview by Abhay Sardesai | ArtIndia 

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Indian Art Fair | 'So much for stereotypes'

Indian Art Fair | 'So much for stereotypes' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

“I’m puzzled by the way you hang on to stereotypes of the rest and the west – aren’t we beyond that now?". 

The question, raised by a member of the audience at the Speaker’s Forum at the India Art Fair in Delhi last week, was a response to papers – notably by Spanish art historian Estrella de Diego – that had critiqued the west-centric bias of an art world where a show at an institution such as Tate or MoMA is still required if an artist is to be taken seriously on the global stage. Such injustices are inarguably present. Yet in Delhi last week, both within the fair and in the city beyond, artists overturned cultural stereotypes with imagination, intellect and joie de vivre. Meanwhile the presence of the likes of Tate, MoMA and the Art Institute of Chicago reminded us that those museums need artists from afar just as much as artists need their approval (...)


Work : 'Frida Sits on Double Pepsi’ (2013) by Pakpoom Silaphan, at Scream Gallery ;
Article by Rachel Spence | FT.com

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Interview | Artist Hajra Waheed On “Sea Change”, her India Debut Solo

Interview | Artist Hajra Waheed On “Sea Change”, her India Debut Solo | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"As children, most of us spent a large amount of time getting acquainted with our imagined realities. We developed grand vocabularies around these alternate places and people and narratives, and at times, even invited our friends in to explore these intimate spaces with us. I suppose in some ways I never stopped developing stories from that very place. Of course, my narratives have matured (at least I would hope so!) and are deeply influenced by my many lived experiences traversing borders, or rather, living among them. So many of us who live along these lines (either by choice or force) do go missing or disappear at times, just to re-emerge later. I am fascinated by those who — yes, dare to journey across the borders they once built for themselves. It takes courage to do so, to leave what you know in order to better understand what you don’t. “Sea Change” begins to explore the narratives around this very migration — one that is as much physical as it is psychological and/or emotional."


Work by Hajra Waheed
Interview by Rosalyn D'Mello | ArtInfo 

khicṛī's insight:

A show not to be missed, at Kolkata's Experimenter's Gallery

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Exhibition in Delhi at Exhibit 320 | 'Postcards from the Interior'

Exhibition in Delhi at Exhibit 320 | 'Postcards from the Interior' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Indigenous Americans once believed that when a photograph was taken, it stole a piece of the person’s soul. Similar to mirrors, which many cultures regarded as reservoirs of our ‘selves’ and hence felt, if broken, would bring ill luck and disquiet. These beliefs function as powerful metaphors for how images define us—our physical borders, the individual arrangement of our features, and our identity in terms of our differences with others. Recently, Alex Parker, a London-based amateur photographer, took pictures of himself standing with one other person or another—a friend, acquaintance or stranger. He titled the series Me. Tanvi Mishra, a Delhi-based freelance photographer and debut curator, has orchestrated a similarly intimate exhibition, one that gazes at the lives of others, whether it be the artist or his or her subject.A startlingly talented group of photographers explores the theme of self and identity through an intensely personal lens"

Photograph by Ankit Goyal

Article by Janice Pariat | Open Magazine 

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Crowdfunding | 'Don't Breathe' by Ronny Sen

Crowdfunding | 'Don't Breathe' by Ronny Sen | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"For millions, traveling inside unreserved general compartments in Indian trains is an inescapable Indian experience. A rapidly escalating inflation has resulted in severe hikes in fuel prices in India, compelling an increasing number of people to travel in unreserved general compartments of the Indian Railways."

 

Text and Photograph by Ronny Sen

Support the project on emphas.is

http://www.emphas.is/web/guest/discoverprojects?projectID=774#7
 

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'To Conquer her Land' By Poulomi Basu

'To Conquer her Land' By Poulomi Basu | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Photographer Poulomi Basu said she got the idea after reading a newspaper article in 2009: India for the first time was recruiting women to serve in its Border Security Patrol, training them to police the country’s long and dangerous boundary with its archenemy, Pakistan.

“I thought this was something important that needed to be documented,” said Ms. Basu, who was born in India and divides her time now between London and Mumbai.

The merit of the project magnified in her mind as she realized all that her photos might show. Most of the recruits were from impoverished rural areas. If she could observe them not only in training but with their families as well, she would be able to tell the story of their transformation from villagers into soldiers.

“For these women, putting on a uniform was like coming out of their own skin,” Ms. Basu said. “They saw it as a way of gaining some form of independence...”

 

Photograph by Poulomi Basu

Article by Barry Bearak | LENS NYT

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Painted Photographs: Coloured Portraiture in India, from The Alkazi Collection of Photography

Painted Photographs: Coloured Portraiture in India, from The Alkazi Collection of Photography | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

As the venerable Ebrahim Alkazi himself says in the Foreword: “Indian Photographic studios developed their own karkhanas (artists’ ateliers and workshops) much in the manner of the traditional Mughal and regional schools of painting. They adopted particular styles and devised distinctive provincial traits and palettes. Some catered to royal patrons whose custom set them distinctly apart; others found a steady lucrative business in serving the needs of the burgeoning and prosperous mercantile and professional classes. With its fantastic painted backdrops of verdant landscapes, royal gardens, rearing stallions, tempestuous oceans and secret boudoirs, this unique mode of photography passed into the accepted aesthetic traditions of Indian life and has survived as one of its most delightful rituals.”

 

Photo courtesy: The Alkazi Collection

Article by Ranvir Shah | The Hindu

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