Indian Photographies
14.5K views | +3 today
Follow
Indian Photographies
Visual Culture in the Subcontinent
Curated by khicṛī
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Delhi Photographer Chandan Gomes Looks Back on His Modest Childhood Home - Feature Shoot

Delhi Photographer Chandan Gomes Looks Back on His Modest Childhood Home  - Feature Shoot | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

20 Chandan Gomes (MA 2015) is an Indian photographer currently pursuing his Masters in Philosophy from St. Stephen's College in Delhi. His photographic work germinates from the diaries and journals he has kept over the years, and is heavily influenced by literature and philosophy. Stemming from the conflict he experienced between his modest Delhi upbringing and prestigious education, Gomes' project There Are Things I Call Home reexamines his sense of origin through the objects that surrounded him as a child, attempting to reclaim a sense of intimacy in a home that has, for him, become estranged and distant."


Photograph | Chandan Gomes

Text | Acacia Johnson (Feature Shoot)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Exhibition in Delhi at Exhibit 320 | 'Postcards from the Interior'

Exhibition in Delhi at Exhibit 320 | 'Postcards from the Interior' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Indigenous Americans once believed that when a photograph was taken, it stole a piece of the person’s soul. Similar to mirrors, which many cultures regarded as reservoirs of our ‘selves’ and hence felt, if broken, would bring ill luck and disquiet. These beliefs function as powerful metaphors for how images define us—our physical borders, the individual arrangement of our features, and our identity in terms of our differences with others. Recently, Alex Parker, a London-based amateur photographer, took pictures of himself standing with one other person or another—a friend, acquaintance or stranger. He titled the series Me. Tanvi Mishra, a Delhi-based freelance photographer and debut curator, has orchestrated a similarly intimate exhibition, one that gazes at the lives of others, whether it be the artist or his or her subject.A startlingly talented group of photographers explores the theme of self and identity through an intensely personal lens"

Photograph by Ankit Goyal

Article by Janice Pariat | Open Magazine 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Khoj Dus Tak : A Multi-Disciplinary Community-Based Arts Fest in Delhi

Khoj Dus Tak : A Multi-Disciplinary Community-Based Arts Fest in Delhi | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"It’s been a decade since the Khoj International Artists’ Association made the urban village of Khirkee Extension its home. This year is also important in Khoj’s calendar for the newly furbished building and exhibition space that they have finished constructing. To celebrate these two milestones, Khoj is now gearing up for a three day arts festival that they say has no precedence in the city’s art history. Scheduled from November 23-25, the festival, titled Khoj Dus Tak, will host 20 projects, six events and 27 artists and give the residents of Khirkee a chance to double up as artists, musicians, theatre artists, cooks and more.

(...)

Among the 20 projects, will be a “Photo Studio” created in one of the rooms of the newly renovated Khoj where the residents of Khirkee will be invited to get their photographs taken at minimum price so that they can create memories that mark their lives. “Shop Makeovers” will bring eight artists – Upasana Mehdiratta, Gaurvi Sharma, Vinima Gulati, Ram Bali Chauhan, Tulsi Ram, Amitabh Kumar, and Sanjib Roy – who will work in collaboration with five shopkeepers to exchange ideas and develop a collective method of art-making. The artists will help the shopkeepers to identify and translate ideas about how they can re-decorate their shops. “Khirkee Murals” is another project where Anpu Varke, a former resident of Khirkee and Nasheen, a current resident of Khirkee, will mark their stay and interaction with Khirkee by drawing murals relating to the changing face of Khirkee and ongoing urban expansion. For “Khirkee Raag”, Tarik, a band based in Delhi and Shillong, will collaborate with three musicians from Khirkee to create an original song about the place. Sounds from the local chai wallah, small production units and hawkers will compliment the musical content. For “Khirkee ka Khana & Recipe books” project, on each day of the festival, Khoj will invite five women of Khirkee to cook special food items of their own creation. The food will then be served to the general public while a recipe book will also be made available."

 

Article by Satarupa Paul | Artinfo

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Gauri Gill | 'The Last Days of Freedom'

Gauri Gill | 'The Last Days of Freedom' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"The girls who come to the fair have an urge to know [of the outside world]. Those who stepped into my photo tent also wished to portray themselves as they are, or as they see themselves, or to invent new selves for the camera. Their attempts may have been tentative or bold, but this book may be seen as a catalogue of that desire.

I think of Urma and Halima, two girls who belong to the nomadic Jogi community, one that has few rights, that survives precariously on the fringes of villages and small towns and may almost be said to exist outside society as we know it, without access to land, regular employment, schools, healthcare or recourse to law. Urma and Halima came into the tent and sat down very straight on the white plastic chair and the black metal stool, flanking the plastic flower arrangement on its gleaming stand. They looked at the camera with poise and confidence, not unlike the Maharanis of a hundred years ago. This book is for them."

 

-----
Ballika Mela by Gauri Gill, published by Edition Patrick Frey, will be released in Delhi in September 2012. With 72 black-and-white plates and 32 colour reproductions, essays by Gill herself and Manju Saran (in English and Hindi), the book is a record of Gill’s photo studio set up to take portraits of the predominantly female adolescents who attended the fair in remote and rural western Rajasthan

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

City Report | Delhi

City Report | Delhi | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Since the late 1990s, the art scene in the Indian capital and its environs has swelled from a handful of galleries to a thriving constellation of non-profits, residency programmes and artist-run spaces."

Article by Devika Singh and Raqs Media Collective | Frieze 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Photography Quaterly PIX : upcoming issue on 'Freedom'

Photography Quaterly PIX : upcoming issue on 'Freedom' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"PIX is not a quarterly that rides solely on the photographs featured in the issues. (...) For every issue we juxtapose the photographers' bodies of work with a writer that we think would be able to best respond to those images. (...)

This process of combining practitioners from these two worlds sometimes leads to unexpectedly successful collaborations, for example, Indrajit Hazra's piece in the upcoming issue of PIX, speaking about Andrea Fernandes' series “Killing Kittens”. Hazra responded to the works instantaneously, providing a perspective that I feel completes the piece in a way. Incorporating text into the magazine gives it a new breathing space. (...) Photography, much like writing, is a kind of language. The images provoke some sort of feeling when one looks at them; they speak to you in some way. The writer takes that feeling and runs with it, and this is where the dialogue begins."

 

Tanvi Mishra | Interview for ArtInfo.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Exhibition in Delhi | Madan Mahatta’s Photographs Document the Birth of Modern Delhi’s Architecture

Exhibition in Delhi | Madan Mahatta’s Photographs Document the Birth of Modern Delhi’s Architecture | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Every now and then a show comes along that compels us to challenge our conception of the contemporary history of photography in India. In the last few years, since the space for photography has expanded, a range of photo archives have been pulled out from storage and have found a place on gallery walls and collectors' homes. The photography community was most recently reintroduced to the work of photographers like Umrao Sher-Gil, Lala Deen Dayal, Kulwant Roy, Homai Vyarawala, and Richard Bartholomew all of whose legacy has been reinstated thanks to the efforts of family members, curators, and gallerists. The few whose works are yet to be revisited in the form of an exhibition have been kept in public memory by photographer Ram Rahman through his series of talks on “The Forgotten Histories” of Indian photography. Through his presentations, Rahman has been adamantly reminding the photography community about photographers like his architect father Habib Rahman, Sunil Janah, and many others whose contribution to the evolution of Indian photography cannot possibly be ignored. Most of the photographers Rahman alludes to have passed away, but some, like Madan Mahatta are very much around, and yesterday, a show of his work opened at Delhi’s Photoink to much critical acclaim. Curated by Rahman, “Delhi Modern: The Architectural Photographs of Madan Mahatta” showcases about 70 photographs taken by Mahatta from the 50s until the mid-80s, documenting the modern architectural history of post-Independent India..."

Article by Roselyne D'Mello | ArtInfo 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Exhibition in Delhi | 'Dawn Upon Delhi: Rise of a Capital' at NGMA

Exhibition in Delhi | 'Dawn Upon Delhi: Rise of a Capital' at NGMA | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

An exhibition titled 'Dawn Upon Delhi: Rise of a Capital' is set to bring to life the glittering but chequered past of the city.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

'Documenting the now'

'Documenting the now' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Acclaimed photographers Raghu Rai and Nitin Rai, whose works were on show as part of the Father and Son exhibitions in New Delhi, open up on what makes images special.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

An Edgy Art Haven in India Gains Momentum

An Edgy Art Haven in India Gains Momentum | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
The indie Khoj International Artists' Association was established in 1997 as a nonprofit visual arts incubator and has since grown to become one of India's most vibrant and talked-about art hubs.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

REVIEW | 'Love, Honour & Disobey' by Colin Pantall

REVIEW | 'Love, Honour & Disobey' by Colin Pantall | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Given an open commission to return to India to shoot a new body of work, Max Pinckers approached the Love Commandos in New Delhi, an organisation that helps couples who have fallen in love escape the threat of honour violence from their disapproving families. But, finds Colin Pantall, the result is a world away from a traditional documentary record, instead developing the approach of his previous work, using staged scenarios influenced by Bollywood cinema..."

Text by Colin Pantall.
First published in the British Journal of Photography magazine, UK, October 2013. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Indian Art Fair | 'So much for stereotypes'

Indian Art Fair | 'So much for stereotypes' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

“I’m puzzled by the way you hang on to stereotypes of the rest and the west – aren’t we beyond that now?". 

The question, raised by a member of the audience at the Speaker’s Forum at the India Art Fair in Delhi last week, was a response to papers – notably by Spanish art historian Estrella de Diego – that had critiqued the west-centric bias of an art world where a show at an institution such as Tate or MoMA is still required if an artist is to be taken seriously on the global stage. Such injustices are inarguably present. Yet in Delhi last week, both within the fair and in the city beyond, artists overturned cultural stereotypes with imagination, intellect and joie de vivre. Meanwhile the presence of the likes of Tate, MoMA and the Art Institute of Chicago reminded us that those museums need artists from afar just as much as artists need their approval (...)


Work : 'Frida Sits on Double Pepsi’ (2013) by Pakpoom Silaphan, at Scream Gallery ;
Article by Rachel Spence | FT.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Exhibition at Photoink Gallery | Kashmir by Amit Mehra

Exhibition at Photoink Gallery | Kashmir by Amit Mehra | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

It’s a photograph of a hotel. Once a thriving, buzzing hotel in Gulmarg, now empty and silent. The picture is taken through a window. The next image is that of a boy with flutes in the foreground, also through a window. A tailor, also seen through a window, examines a needle and thread. Through a door, a window, or barbed wire—each picture has been captured from a distance; perhaps a distance as great as the Kashmiri reality is from the rest of the country.

 

Photograph by Amit Mehra

Article by Shreya Ray | LiveMint

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

7 Days in Delhi : 7 films 7 artists 7 locations

7 Days in Delhi : 7 films 7 artists 7 locations | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

In 7 days Third Ear’s Miriam Nielsen met 7 visual artists from the hyped and happening Indian art scene in Delhi.

The works of these artists comment on and interact with the city directly - which is why she asked them to take her to 7 locations in Delhi – to the places that inspire them.

 

Gigi Scaria places sculptures in transitional spaces in the city and photographs them. Sarnath Banerjee uses the hustlers that hang out in central Delhi as the characters in his graphic novels. B.L.O.T create stop motion animations out of the rich visual fabric of Old Delhi. Aastha Chauhan engages local people in a suburban part of the city in her radio programmes and community projects. Pushpamala N takes us to her “dress-wallah” where she buys costumes and backdrops for her shoots. Rohini Devashers videos and drawings are inspired by science and astronomy. She takes us to the Jantar Mantar an astronomical observatory from 1724 located in New Delhi. Vivan Sundaram creates works out of garbage, with the trash collectors who live at the periphery of the city.

Each of them open our eyes to this fast changing city, and its vibrant art scene.

 

Credits :
Directed and photographed by Miriam Nielsen, Sound by Tim Hinman, Edited by Michael Aaglund, Music by B.L.O.T and others.

 

http://thirdear.dk/7days/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Exhibition in Delhi | 'Mastering the Lens : Before and After Cartier-Bresson in Pondicherry'

Exhibition in Delhi | 'Mastering the Lens : Before and After Cartier-Bresson in Pondicherry' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
Photographs culled from an unbound and unpublished album of Henri Cartier-Bresson taken in Pondicherry are at the core of an upcoming exhibition...

 

" In Henri Cartier-Bresson’s life that remained eventful till the end, one chapter belonged to the photographer’s visit to Aurobindo Ashram in Pondicherry in the ’50s. The father of modern photojournalism had of course been to India earlier, met Mahatma Gandhi and even covered his funeral. All of that remains well-known but his work on the Ashram remains comparatively less talked about. Bresson, it is said, had a knack for bearing witness to historic moments. So this time too, he was there shooting Sri Aurobindo, the revered yogi-philosopher-guru-poet, just a few months before his death.

The Alkazi Foundation for the Arts in collaboration with Alliance Francaise de Delhi is presenting some masterly frames made during this engagement. The exhibition “Mastering the Lens: Before and After Cartier-Bresson in Pondicherry” will be accompanied by the launch of a publication collaboratively published by the Alkazi Collection, Mapin and the French Embassy. “Cartier-Bresson was fascinated by The Mother (Mirra Alfassa) and what was going on at the Ashram. He sought permission to photograph it and it was granted. He stayed there for 10 days. Now the photographs that he shot were compiled by The Mother into albums. The Mother bought negatives from him and brought out as many as 30 albums but only one album remains now,” says Rahaab Allana, curator of the Alkazi Foundation for the Arts.

The majority of the images to be showcased in this exhibition belong to this unbound and unpublished album of Cartier-Bresson. Besides taking the last pictures of Sri Aurobindo Ghose in the company of his spiritual companion, The Mother, the French photographer also recorded his observations and experiences. The exhibition also features these notes. Now, even though Alkazi Collection owns these photographs, the copyright remains with Fondation Henri Cartier-Bresson which was managed by his wife Martine Franck, who passed away last month. The exhibition is dedicated to Franck, also a Magnum photographer, specialising in portraiture photography."

 

Photo : 'The Mother Playing tennis' | Henri Cartier-Bresson

Article by Shailaja Tripathi | The Hindu

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by khicṛī from L'actualité de la photographie en Inde et ailleurs
Scoop.it!

Michael Bühler-Rose : 'Interrogating Conventions'

Michael Bühler-Rose : 'Interrogating Conventions' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Michael Bühler-Rose uses western painting styles: still lifes, landscapes, portraits, to enact scenes of Hindu civilization: representations of gods and goddesses, incense, flowers or bharatanatyiam costumes worn by young American women.
These pictures create a dialogue between the Orient and the Occident, creating a game of mirrors and reflections that interact endlessly, creating a juxtaposition of territories. Vision is caught by well-known images: the swiss alps with its wooden chalets, with a young Indian woman stretched out in the field which we later discover was used for a Bollywood movie to represent the Cashmir mountains!
The photographer, born in the United States but raised under the Vishnu god, assimilates the two civilizations in a game of coming and going. A connection that reinforces the particularities, the originalities, and the symbolic forces of these two worlds.

Article by Sybile Girault | Le Journal de la Photographie 


Via Sybile Girault
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Mulimedia | 'Dilli Purani Dilli Naye' by Adrian Fisk

Mulimedia | 'Dilli Purani Dilli Naye' by Adrian Fisk | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
These photographs are of a city caught between a dream and a nightmare. The images in Dilli Purani Dilli Naye (Delhi Old / Delhi New), made during 2009 and 2010, are experimental in nature - spur of the moment photographs made with a $200 film camera.

 

Delhi celebrates its 100th anniversary as the capital of India last year. This is a 360 degree view of my life in the Capital, an intimate portrait of my relationship with Delhi, a city going through a period of great change: a mega urban mass that uniquely juxtaposes beauty, opportunity and desire against frustration, darkness and inequality; a capital that trades idioms in fleeting moments, revealing the strange coexistence of those that have and those that do not; a city that is both purani and naye.

 

Adrian Fisk
www.adrianfisk.com

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

Exhibition in NYC | ‘Princes and Painters in Mughal Delhi’ at Asia Society

Exhibition in NYC | ‘Princes and Painters in Mughal Delhi’ at Asia Society | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"The show covers the late reign of the rich and powerful Mughals, from whom we derive the word mogul. At their height the Mughals ruled over much of the land that today comprises India, Pakistan, Bangladesh and Afghanistan, founding the opulent city of Shahjahanabad, now Old Dehli, in 1648. The exhibition tracks their decline, which coincided with the rise of British rule in India..."

Martha Schwendener in  the NYT

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

'Writing on the wall' | Graffiti in India is sprouting

'Writing on the wall' | Graffiti in India is sprouting | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"...Daku began “writing” two years ago along with other graffiti artists, who were making their presence felt across the city. The graffiti artists often interact through streetfiles.org, an independent street art and photo sharing community. Daku, Bond and Zine painted together for sometime with locally available material like automobile paint cans and wall paints, slowly graduating to paints used for making graffiti. In that sense, Daku says, India is where the United States of America was in the Eighties, when graffiti began spreading as a culture: “They too, used automobile paints for graffiti...”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

India Matters: Art and industry

India Matters: Art and industry | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
The buzz around art keeps growing, whether it's the discovery of Indian collectors by western artists and galleries as their economies sink deeper into recession, or the celebration of home grown artists by phirangi brands and auction houses.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by khicṛī
Scoop.it!

New Delhi's India Art Fair explodes this year

New Delhi's India Art Fair explodes this year | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
India Art Fair is officially one of the best attended art events in the world: How to enjoy it and New Delhi at the same time.
more...
Alexander Evans and Michael Robinson's curator insight, October 29, 2014 5:05 AM

The Indian Art Fair was founded by 31-year-old Neha Kirpal in 2008.

This art fair shows the work of a variety of famous arts such as Picasso, Dali, Rashid Rana and Damien Hirst. During the first three editions of the fair over 170,00 visitors show up. This makes the Indian Art Fair one of the world's most popular fairs.