Indian Photographies
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Visual Culture in the Subcontinent
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Book | 'A Certain Grace', The Sidi: Indians of African Descent, by Ketaki Sheth

Book | 'A Certain Grace', The Sidi: Indians of African Descent, by Ketaki Sheth | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it
Photographer Ketaki Sheth's new book is a heartfelt profile of the Sidis.
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Rare Book Society of India | Indian theatrical group, Bombay (1870)

Rare Book Society of India | Indian theatrical group, Bombay (1870) | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Photograph of a Theatrical Group in Bombay (now Mumbai) from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Bombay Presidency' by an unknown photographer in the 1870s. This was a studio portrait of a Marathi theatrical troupe, in costume, posed in front of a backdrop of a European interior. Marathi theatre has a long tradition of performance, incorporating songs and dances, and in the 18th century a popular form of folk theatre developed called Tamasha, with snatches of dance and acrobatic movements. Modern Marathi theatre originated in the mid-19th century.

Copyright © The British Library Board | Via RBSI

 

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Book Review | 'Kamra' Ed. by Munem Wasif & Tanzim Wahab

Book Review | 'Kamra' Ed. by Munem Wasif & Tanzim Wahab | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

'Photography in Rearview'

 

"Art is constantly evolving. It travels through time, space, medium and perceptions, constantly contradicting and breaking boundaries. Photography, a relatively recent art form for both ends of the world now stands as a prime witness to time and has combined the old and new to create its own language, different from those we quintessentially experience on a canvas. While the globalized West is institutionalizing progressive photography, the phenomenon has more recently reached its hype in Bangladesh. Courtesy of international trade, China, new media and peer pressure, equipments are widely available and a ‘photographer’ is found at every nook and corner.

 

Exciting times as such is frequently described as desperate times. Because of its prevalence, photography – like any other creative outlet – faces the same doubt, the same criticism of being overestimated. And it is perhaps because of this very overestimation that triggered photographers Munem Wasif and Tanzim Wahab to take a step back and re-explore the origin of photography in the East and West. A compilation of articles, interviews, commentaries and profiles, Kamra is a much needed conversation on how the art form has evolved over time and found its niche in Bangladesh..."

 

Article by Sabhanaz Rashid Diya | Daily Star Weekend Magazine

Also discover the book on http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h23vxssI5Mo

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'The Blue Simmer' | Sohrab Hura on Dayanita Singh's work

'The Blue Simmer' | Sohrab Hura on Dayanita Singh's work | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"I can understand now the reluctance on her part for her work to be taken in the context of ‘Indian photography’ and I hope the younger generations of photographers also find in themselves a similar reluctance. Such categories can sometimes become a justification for bad work. While it’s always interesting to look at work in the context of the photographer’s geographical and cultural background, it should be able to stand strong amongst photography from anywhere else. Unlike music, where the instruments can be unique to particular countries, photography’s tool — the camera — is universally the same. We just express a difference in visual language and sensibility. Dayanita’s work has transcended all such categorisation, and in the end it doesn’t really matter where the work comes from — all that matters is that it comes from her. While photographers in India chase after something called ‘contemporary photography’, her’s remains one of the last few honest bodies of work unconscious of any category it’s supposed to fit into..."


Text by Sohrab Hura | Tehelka Magazine

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Of Misery and Glory

Of Misery and Glory | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

The story of two photographers, Raghu Rai and Kishor Parekh, and their books on the birth of Bangladesh

Article : Elizabeth Kuruvilla | Open Magazine 

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Books | Richard Bartholomew, The Art Critic : An insider's account of the birth of Modern Indian Art

Books | Richard Bartholomew, The Art Critic : An insider's account of the birth of Modern Indian Art | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Featuring over 250 illustrations and including an extensive selection of never-before-seen black-and-white photographs by Richard documenting the art scene, The Art Critic is an absolute essential for art lovers and enthusiasts keen on an insider’s account of the untold story of Modern Indian Art.

 

Archive Editors: Rati Bartholomew • Carmen Kagal • Pablo Bartholomew

Introduction by Geeta Kapur

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Book Review | 'A Family Portrait', Akshay Mahajan on Kushal Ray's photo novel 'Intimacies'

Book Review | 'A Family Portrait', Akshay Mahajan on Kushal Ray's photo novel 'Intimacies' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

'Young wavering photojournalists, such as myself, often go in search of pictures with a sometimes wanton thirst. They move cities, living their days out of cheap bus-stand lodges or friends’ apartments, and nights drinking outside cheap bars on Church Street. Anything that provokes a narrative. They probably think that like Nan Goldin, they’ll make pictures representing the transgressions of young urban dwellers. Faltering, perhaps they’ll meet a young queer poet and dance writer and find a subject. Over the next six months — furtive conversations over cheap whiskey at watering holes, words punctuated by drags of cigarettes and post-ganja confessions in bedrooms — they will take pictures of their friends, teasing out nuggets of a story. Rolls of film fed by curiosity. As Goldin put it, “It’s the form of photography that is most defined by love. People… take them to remember people”. This love is born out of a long-standing relationship between the observer and the subject.

 

On the face of it, Kushal Ray’s Intimacies is a series that could be seen as a representation of domestic decline, even a “human catastrophe”. Critiques of Ray’s photographs as an episodic representation of the decline in Kolkata’s middle class, the 12-room, family home of the Chatterjees, seem to encapsulate the slow withering of a joint family. They see Ray’s interiors as a metaphor for the politics that aims to unmask the accident of poverty. Perhaps, even a representation of his working class family’s poverty and violence; stages of personal degradation and suffering...'

 

Text by Akshay Mahajan | Tehelka
 

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