Indian Photographies
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Visual Culture in the Subcontinent
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A Photographer’s Account of Bal Thackeray’s Funeral

A Photographer’s Account of Bal Thackeray’s Funeral | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"The crowds were filing in now, small men casting long shadows that reminded me of Vincent Laforet’s aerial photographs of skaters in New York City. I shot some photos on my phone, instagrammed and tweeted those. In a few minutes they went viral. My caption for one picture was ‘This is Not Tahrir Square’, the sarcasm was missed but the photo was widely retweeted."

 

Photography and Text by Ritesh Uttamchandani | Open Magazine

More of his work on http://riteshuttamchandani.photoshelter.com

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Rare Book Society of India | Indian theatrical group, Bombay (1870)

Rare Book Society of India | Indian theatrical group, Bombay (1870) | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

Photograph of a Theatrical Group in Bombay (now Mumbai) from the Lee-Warner Collection: 'Bombay Presidency' by an unknown photographer in the 1870s. This was a studio portrait of a Marathi theatrical troupe, in costume, posed in front of a backdrop of a European interior. Marathi theatre has a long tradition of performance, incorporating songs and dances, and in the 18th century a popular form of folk theatre developed called Tamasha, with snatches of dance and acrobatic movements. Modern Marathi theatre originated in the mid-19th century.

Copyright © The British Library Board | Via RBSI

 

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Exhibition in Mumbai | Rashid Rana: 'Apposite - Opposite'

Exhibition in Mumbai | Rashid Rana: 'Apposite - Opposite' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

On April 9, Rana's show will open across two galleries in Mumbai, Chemould Prescott Road and Chatterjee & Lal, his first exhibition in the city in five years. On display will be a series of works in what is now his trademark style: large photo mosaics made up of scores of tiny, seeming unrelated or contradictory individual images. One of the most provocative examples of this technique is the six-part Veil series, first exhibited at London's prestigious Saatchi Gallery and Chatterjee & Lal in Mumbai in 2007. The work showed an anonymous figure dressed in a burkha, with this larger image made up of tiny, blurred pornographic stills of women, taken from the internet. By juxtaposing the two ideas, Rana critiqued negative stereotypes of women, both the sexual objectification inherent in pornography and the stereotypical image of women from the Islamic world constructed by the media.
 

The paradoxes and duality of a larger image and its constituent smaller images have dominated Rana's artistic practice for the past decade. "Today, every image, idea and truth - whether in ancient mythology or the news of the day - encompasses its opposite within itself. We live in a state of duality," says Rana. "My works are an effort to represent this complexity and transcend the bold divisions that people create in their perceptions."
 

Thus, in Mumbai this month, Rana will exhibit works such as the Language Series, three mosaic landscapes made up of tiny photographs taken by Rana over the past two years of all kinds of text present outdoors in Lahore, such as chalk messages on walls, banners, posters and signboards. "So much of cultural, social and political history is embedded in these texts," says Rana...

Article by Riddhi Doshi | Hindustan Times 

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Photo Essay | 'Beanbags' by Zubin Pastakia

Photo Essay | 'Beanbags' by Zubin Pastakia | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Mumbai can drive you crazy. And because (or, perhaps, despite) of this, you want to make sense of it. You want to make some kind of order out of it. And more often than not, in trying to create order, you succumb to the same thing that almost everyone succumbs to, the same trap: you fall for the idea of the “Maximum City”, the chaos, the speed, the heat, the shit, the poor, the rich, all at once, the grand narrative of 17 million people forced to live on top of one another in a city held together by ingenuity, momentum and sheer force of will. You succumb to this because it’s true, to a degree, and because it’s intoxicating, and also because it’s easy. In the overwhelming face of everything it’s easy to say, “all life is here, it’s messy, and it works!” and turn a blind eye to everything else. But it gets kind of boring. And it means that other interpretations are lost.

 

If you’ve lived or worked in Mumbai in the last five or ten years you’ll have seen the beanbag graffiti: Beanbags 26407383. I saw it once and then, like a new word you learn, I saw it everywhere, on walls, houses, pipelines, metal sheets, flyovers, construction sites, waste-ground. Everywhere: Beanbags 26407383. It was, it is, the work of a beanbag salesman, who had the genius to go out and spray the city with the name of his product and a phone number, at one stroke bypassing the legal, unaffordable marketing mechanisms of the ‘official’ city springing up around him. In the city of commerce, the very fabric of the city became an advertising hoarding. And this is how he made his fortune.

 

It’s a nice story, but we were interested in something else too. We were interested in the opportunity the repeated motif provided us to look at the city with different eyes, in a different light, away from the “Maximum” view...."

 

Text : Matthew Parker
Photograph  : Zubin Pastakia

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Exhibition at NGMA | 'Project Cinema City'

Exhibition at NGMA | 'Project Cinema City' | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"Organised by the National Gallery of Modern Art and Ministry of Culture to commemorate 100 years of Indian cinema, Project Cinema City brings together more than 20 artists, designers, technicians and architects in a collaborative show that excavates the connections between the Hindi film industry and the city of Bombay/Bambai/Mumbai, which is both the real-life site of its birth and the imaginary locale where so many of its narratives unfold.

The traits of urban modernity—anonymity, artifice, technology, speed—are echoed in our experience of cinema. Project Cinema City contains several art works that draw on these connections, inviting us to enter a space of fantasy that’s as much about the excitement and frisson of the city as it is about the pleasures of the cinematic. The first of these is a collaborative audio-visual piece that involves a series of women talking of the experience of watching films. One woman talks of how she missed out on a family expedition to the first air-conditioned theatre (Liberty) to show a Hindi film, yet another reminisces about the women of the family doing ‘full-make-up’ in the cinema bathroom so that they were actually late for the movie.... "

 

Photo : 'Fearless Nadia to the Rescue", a frame from 'Return of the Phantom Lady' by Pushpamala N.

 

Article by Trisha Gupta | Open Magazine

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Naseeb: Trafficked

Naseeb: Trafficked | Indian Photographies | Scoop.it

"I wanted to understand the reasons for this epidemic; Why was this happening? How was it happening? And to hear of first hand experiences from the girls. I heard many stories of poverty, bad families, deception by friends and families, kidnappings and horrific experiences on trafficking routes. Sometimes the girls had left their homes of their own will, other times they were running away from violent husbands or simply in search of a better life. The stories differed but one commonality existed: they had all been deceived". Sonal Kantaria

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