Indian Economy
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India’s Real Problem is Corruption, Not Poor Policies | Economy Watch

India’s Real Problem is Corruption, Not Poor Policies | Economy Watch | Indian Economy | Scoop.it
While economists argue over the best policies for India’s future growth, they ignore the nation’s largest problem: that no matter how inventive or well-intentioned a policy may be, corruption will always get in its way.
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India's Untold Story: Solar, Wind Projects Create Jobs, Clean Energy | The Energy Collective

India's Untold Story: Solar, Wind Projects Create Jobs, Clean Energy | The Energy Collective | Indian Economy | Scoop.it

As India celebrates its 67th Independence Day this week, the country can also celebrate its clean energy opportunities as solar, wind and other renewable energy projects expand throughout India. This week, the Indian government announced a $7.9 billion investment to double its transmission capacity – designed to increase access to power from wind and solar projects. For example, India’s installed solar energy has jumped from a mere 17 megawatts in 2010, when India’s National Solar Mission was announced, to over 1.7 megawatts today. Not only do these clean energy projects increase India’s energy supply, they also create much needed jobs.

 

The Indian government and businesses around the country are making significant investments in renewable resources. The investment in transmission capacity and the next phase of the National Solar Mission are examples policies to drive clean energy development. The motivations for these investments, in part, are to continue to power India’s rapid economic growth and increase energy access by providing modern electricity to the near 400 million people in India without access to modern electricity.   

 

As India’s economy grows and develops, its energy consumption likewise is increasing rapidly: it increased 64 percent from 2001-02 to 2011-12 and is projected to grow an additional 72 percent by 2021-22, according to the Indian Planning Commission. India’s current energy supply, primarily made up of fossil fuels, cannot keep up with growing demand, as evidenced by chronic power cuts. India also needs large scale job creation, a topic that will surely gain attention given upcoming elections and regional statehood discussions.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Sino and Makena's curator insight, November 5, 2014 1:45 PM

I think this is great as it is good for the economy and provides more jobs. It is a cleaner way to get energy, and India is following other regions in the world with similar technology. We can really use the environment to our advantage and use the wind for jobs and power.

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Politicians Talk, the Rupee Drops, India's Economy Tanks - Bloomberg

Politicians Talk, the Rupee Drops, India's Economy Tanks - Bloomberg | Indian Economy | Scoop.it
Economic Times
Politicians Talk, the Rupee Drops, India's Economy Tanks
Bloomberg
India's economy has stalled. Growth in the second quarter fell to 4.4 percent at an annual rate, down from 8 percent two years ago.
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Swagelok Company Announces Opening of India Technology Center - Swagelok

Swagelok Company Announces Opening of India Technology Center - Swagelok | Indian Economy | Scoop.it
Swagelok Company, a major developer and provider of fluid system solutions, will officially open a new technology center in Pune, India, on April 20.
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Why leave the West for India?

Why leave the West for India? | Indian Economy | Scoop.it
Rising numbers of people of Indian origin born in the West are moving to the country their parents left decades ago in search of opportunity and a cultural connection, reports the BBC's Rajini Vaidyanathan.

 

Since 2005, the Indian government has been encouraging people of Indian descent and former Indian nationals to return to India.  For many Indians living in the UK, there are more and better economic opportunities for them within India.   Migrants have many reasons for moving (including cultural factors), but the primary pull factor is most certainly India's ascendant importance in the global economy and rising IT industries. 

 

Tags: India, South Asia, migration, immigration, Europe, colonialism, unit 2 population. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 1, 2014 9:37 PM

As the article says, India is encouraging more people of Indian descent to return to India because of the opportunities that have become increasingly available within the country due to its  westernization . Aside from the corruption and poverty that are in India, the country has not seen any signs of these opportunities stopping.

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, November 10, 2014 4:42 PM

With the rise in globalization and the IT industry, it is obvious that there is opportunity for success.  Many traveled to the US for economic opportunity, however many companies and IT departments are being outsourced to India, thus taking jobs away from the US.  

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, November 11, 2015 11:16 AM

This phenomenon is a direct result of the rise of the Indian economy. Before the IT industry began to set up shop in India, returning to India was economically unfeasible. The development of the Indian economy has made India an attractive place to migrate to. If you are in the IT industry, there is more opportunity for you in India, than there is in the west. Culture is obviously another major pull for Indian immigrants. Throughout history populations have always sought to return to their native land. Especially first generation immigrants, who often never fully assimilate into the culture of their new nation.

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India incurs Rs 2 trillion/year post harvest loss of fruits, veggies - The Economic Times

India incurs Rs 2 trillion/year post harvest loss of fruits, veggies - The Economic Times | Indian Economy | Scoop.it
The country is incurring post harvest losses of fruits and vegetable worth Rs 2 lakh crore per year, due to lack of storage and processing facilities.
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