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Wooden Skyscraper by C.F. Møller Architects

Wooden Skyscraper by C.F. Møller Architects | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it

For HSB Stockholm’s architectural competition 2023, three teams of architects have produced innovative proposals for private residences of the future at three different locations in the centre of Stockholm.


Berg | C.F. Møller‘s proposed design is a 34-storey skyscraper made of wood.

The architects are working in partnership with Dinell Johansson and consultants Tyréns on their entry. The team has chosen to build upwards, and has designed a 34-storey residential building, which will be seen for miles.

The building will be built over a wooden construction with a concrete core, and it is intended to give the people of Stockholm a new and characteristic beacon and meeting place in their city.


Via Lauren Moss
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Wooden Skyscraper by C.F. Møller Architects: (34-storey skyscraper made of wood) 


The architects are working in partnership with Dinell Johansson and consultants Tyréns on their entry. The team has chosen to build upwards, and has designed a 34-storey residential building, which will be seen for miles.

 

The building will be built over a wooden construction with a concrete core, and it is intended to give the people of Stockholm a new and characteristic beacon and meeting place in their city.

 

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#YogaGrove #TO Leslie Buback Yoga Instructor | @YogaGroveTO via @sachinsmo (@castellani & @yoganomics) http://sco.lt/...

#YogaGrove #TO Leslie Buback Yoga Instructor | @YogaGroveTO via @sachinsmo (@castellani & @yoganomics) http://sco.lt/... | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it

Nestled in the beautiful Kingsway neighbourhood of Toronto, Yoga Grove offers small group yoga classes for all ages: preschool, kids, tweens, teens and adults.

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Nestled in the beautiful Kingsway neighbourhood of Toronto, Yoga Grove offers small group yoga classes for all ages: preschool, kids, tweens, teens and adults.

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#Vets #military cope w/ being shut out via #shutdown - #MinneapolisStar @StarTribune @johnboehner

#Vets #military cope w/ being shut out via #shutdown - #MinneapolisStar @StarTribune @johnboehner | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
Minneapolis Star Tribune Vets, military find ways to cope while shut out by shutdown Minneapolis Star Tribune With nurses in surgical scrubs going over charts nearby and the regularly scheduled Thursday yoga class with Doris clearing out the room...
Brian Castellani's insight:

If a vet­er­an want­ed to go over a dis­a­bil­i­ty claim at lunch­time on Thurs­day, it would have to wait un­til af­ter yoga class.

A fed­er­al gov­ern­ment shut­down has locked out the general pub­lic at the Bish­op Henry Whip­ple Federal Building at Fort Snel­ling. Because of the shut­down, vet­er­ans or­gan­i­za­tions such as the Dis­a­bled A­mer­i­can Veterans have had to make do with al­ter­na­tive methods to serve their cli­ents.

 

For Mike Medhaug, who u­su­al­ly han­dles claims for the Min­ne­so­ta DAV in the fed­er­al build­ing, that now means a make­shift desk in the cor­ner of an a­tri­um at the near­by Min­ne­ap­olis VA Medical Center, which re­mains open through the shut­down.

 

With nurses in sur­gi­cal scrubs going over charts near­by and the reg­u­lar­ly sched­uled Thurs­day yoga class with Dor­is clear­ing out the room be­tween 11:45 a.m. and 12:30 p.m., it may not be i­de­al. But Medhaug per­se­veres.

 

Across the coun­try, as many as 95 percent of VA em­ploy­ees are eith­er full­y fund­ed or re­quired to per­form other func­tions. But as the shut­down stretch­es past its se­cond week, some of the more vis­i­ble ex­am­ples of its im­pact could be seen on the state’s 369,000 veterans. In Min­ne­so­ta, vet­er­ans re­ceive $863 mil­lion a year in pensions and com­pen­sa­tion, $865 mil­lion a year in med­i­cal care and $133 mil­lion a year in ed­u­ca­tion­al ben­efits.

 

All of it is now threat­ened.

 

“They are still tak­ing new claims, peo­ple still are get­ting health care, but as you would think, it’s not op­er­at­ing as ef­fi­cient­ly as it may have when it was full­y staffed,” said Milt Schoen, Hennepin County’s di­rec­tor of vet­er­ans ser­vices. “The big is­sue is at the first of the month do they have mon­ey to pay So­cial Security checks, VA checks? We’ve been try­ing not to cre­ate any more anx­i­e­ty amongst people as pos­si­ble. The anx­i­e­ty is there.”

 

U.S. Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki warned Congress this week that if the gov­ern­ment shutdown con­tinues into late Oc­to­ber, compensation pay­ments to more than 3.8 mil­lion vet­er­ans will not be made in No­vem­ber. Pen­sion pay­ments will also stop for al­most 315,000 low-in­come vet­er­ans.

 

“I will not be able to pay all these bene­fi­ciar­ies,” Shin­seki told the House Veterans Affairs Committee on Wednes­day. “I will not be send­ing checks out.”

 

Public access closed

 

All pub­lic ac­cess to the VA’s 56 re­gion­al of­fices was sus­pend­ed Tues­day for lack of funds, the VA said. The vis­i­tor park­ing lot at the Whip­ple Federal Building at midmorning Thurs­day had three cars in it. U­su­al­ly it is filled.

 

Organizations like the DAV are ad­apt­ing. On a typi­cal day, Medhaug, him­self a vet­er­an with 20 years’ ac­tive duty, will see a doz­en walk-ins. Since the shut­down, he said, that has dwin­dled to a cou­ple a day. As the shut­down con­tinues, DAV will use a mo­bile claims of­fice and oth­er re­sources to reach out, even if it means plop­ping the mo­bile of­fice in a park­ing lot of a co­op­er­at­ing shop­ping mall.

“The long­er it goes on, the more cre­ative we’ll be­come,” Medhaug said.

 

Tuition and rent money

 

On Min­ne­so­ta col­lege cam­puses, vet­er­ans using the GI Bill and oth­er fed­er­al ed­u­ca­tion ben­efits are in­creas­ing­ly wor­ried.

“The gov­ern­ment shut­down is caus­ing a lot of anx­i­e­ty and un­cer­tain­ty for stu­dent vet­er­ans,” said Bruce Holzschuh, co­or­di­na­tor of vet­er­ans and mil­i­tar­y stu­dent ser­vices at Metropolitan State University, which has around 1,600 vet­er­ans, serv­ice mem­bers and ­militar­y fam­i­ly mem­bers ad­mit­ted. A­bout 450 are re­ceiv­ing eith­er or both of VA and fed­er­al tu­i­tion as­sist­ance ed­u­ca­tion­al ben­efits.

 

As of now, the tu­i­tion as­sist­ance will not be fund­ed, af­fect­ing stu­dents for the spring se­mes­ter who are still ser­ving. Holzschuh said he also is start­ing to hear from vet­er­ans who have yet to re­ceive an Oc­to­ber hous­ing sti­pend.

 

“This has a di­rect and neg­a­tive im­pact on the stu­dent vet­er­an’s a­bil­i­ty to con­cen­trate and suc­ceed ac­a­dem­i­cal­ly,” he said.

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@stpeteyoga: #StPeteYoga #Festival | St Petersburg, #Florida @floridayogis

St Pete Yoga Festival is three days of amazing events, yoga, meditations, presentations, music, food, dance and more! Learn from St. Pete's best teachers in ...
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St Pete Yoga Festival is three days of amazing events, yoga, meditations, presentations, music, food, dance and more! Learn from St. Pete's best teachers in beautiful surroundings and experience these three days full of inspirational people, teachings and more. Contact Ram Gian @ (954) 798-6396 for more information or to bring an amazing Yoga Festival to your hometown!

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#UK #YOGA classes and private sessions | #yogakindUK #Brighton | #Gumtree

#UK #YOGA classes and private sessions | #yogakindUK #Brighton | #Gumtree | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
YOGA classes and private sessions on Gumtree. New classes Hatha Flow Yoga in Brighton with YogaKind.
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“Natasha is a great teacher. I’ve experienced both her group and private classes and have thoroughly enjoyed them all. She has a true passion for yoga and a genuine love for the well-being of the mind and body. She’ll happily share her knowledge with others, and if you’re keen to learn, maybe it’ll change the way you think about certain things, and send you on a more positive path. I highly recommend trying one of her classes out if you haven’t already. You’ll leave feeling alive…and super bendy!“


James Locke-Hart, Brighton & Hove

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30 children, most of them cancer patients turned away because of #GOP #Shutdown @JHWeissmann

With NIH furloughs, children with cancer are being turned away from clinical trials.
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The Saddest Paragraph You'll Read About the Government Shutdown Today

JORDAN WEISSMANN  OCT 1 2013, 4:36 PM ET 

 

You've heard about the Pandacam, the closed monuments and national parks, and the furloughed federal workers. But so far, nothing I've read about the government shutdown has been nearly as gut-wrenching as this tidbit from The Wall Street Journal:

At the National Institutes of Health, nearly three-quarters of the staff was furloughed. One result: director Francis Collins said about 200 patients who otherwise would be admitted to the NIH Clinical Center into clinical trials each week will be turned away. This includes about 30 children, most of them cancer patients, he said.

House Republicans have failed to stop Obamacare from going into effect so far, but sadly and ironically, their actions have prevented hundreds of people from getting healthcare from just one clinic.

Time to end the shutdown.

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@KaypavhaFest #Astrology Forecast for #Sept 25, 2013

@KaypavhaFest #Astrology Forecast for #Sept 25, 2013 | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
Now that I have chosen to BE just who I am, And express myself more fully, as a woman or a man, I can GIVE myself completely in love again and again! There i...
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Buenos Dias! There is just too much to say! This is too big of a topic to cover in a short Pele Report! I am hosting a "Love and Intimacy in the Horoscope" webinar starting next month and will be doing workshops over the next 6 months while we still have the Moon's Node and Saturn in Scorpio. This rebalancing of the masculine and feminine is also more than love and intimacy.... it has to do with POWER (and who's got it), ownership, money, influence, and beyond that, social/governmental/financial institutions CHANGING that have holding the lid on all of humanity. I will try to include these other topics as well in future Pele Reports. We are now attaching the weekly chart as a .pdf file from now on so you can see the astrology for yourself. Check it out below the video! In addition to the webinar and the monthly subscription that I am doing, I'm excited to invite you to some future events (2 of which have limited capacity). I will be touring the Mayan sacred site with Miguel Angel in February and we are suggesting early registration. Secondly, "The Human-Dolphin Connection" next June (I know it is far away but they sell out early!) in the Bahamas are two events that are going to both be great! I hope you can make one or both and I see you there! Scroll down or check the website for more info on those events. While these may seem like pretty dark times in many ways, there is a purging going on and a building of the new just below the surface that will be emerging when ready. We are the seed people now opening, and though it is dark, we are headed for the light! Saturn will emerge from the depths of Scorpio and Lilith from Cancer! But for now, our task is to diligently stoke the inner fires that we may grow brighter through time to burst forth, break out, and Bring forth the New! Injoy!!!!!! Now that I have chosen to BE just who I am, And express myself more fully, as a woman or a man, I can GIVE myself completely in love again and again! Click the video image below to watch the Pele Report
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#Yoga in the #Hood @greentreeyoga - @LASentinel | @castellani http://sco.lt/...

#Yoga in the #Hood @greentreeyoga - @LASentinel | @castellani http://sco.lt/... | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
When Green Tea Yoga Meditation Foundation set their eyes on a site for their new business, the overlooked community of South Los Angeles was their target. Located at 8227 S.
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Green Tea Yoga Meditation Foundation is helping Crenshaw zen out. When Green Tea Yoga Meditation Foundation set their eyes on a site for their new business, the overlooked community of South Los Angeles was their target. Located at 8227 S. Western Avenue in Los Angeles, GTYMF feels that because other places are so far away, they can make a difference because the studio is within walking distance for the residences and is donation-based. "I looked on Google to see what the area offered and there was one on Crenshaw and 54th Street and one in Inglewood," said founder and executive director, Raja Michelle. "But in Santa Monica, Hollywood and Silverlake, you have a good twenty different options." Despite the bad rap and negative happenings in the area, Michelle believes that being in the heart of the hood is what makes it special. "You look outside and see the cops or people high on something, but I feel like I was guided," said Michelle. "I heard a voice and it made sense." Michelle stated that while it was difficult deciding to do a non-profit because of the paperwork, it became clear that she has an obligation to help others by sharing her experience of yoga and meditation and to make it financially accessible. "I didn't have the capital and there was no way I could have gotten a loan," said Michelle. "Since most business is about money or profit, a non-profit has to be heartfelt. It's not about money, but what I term 'heart movement.'" "We're not here to enable anyone," said Jen Deraspe, president of the board. "The thing about what we're offering is that we can help others help themselves." Furthermore, Deraspe said it makes her uncomfortable when people don't contribute or think it's free because GTYMF doesn't want to enable that attitude. Since opening their doors in March 2013, GTYMF is seeing a slow but consistent growth in attendance from residents who have long desired to take classes and who have been encouraged to do so for health reasons. "My blood pressure readings have dropped twenty points and my cholesterol has gone way down," said local resident, Valerie Merical. Toya Hackett said her doctor suggested she try yoga to reduce her stress and to help her with her Multiple Sclerosis. "My blood pressure is always about 175 and on the verge of stroke," said Hackett. "I don't believe in a lot of pharmaceutical drugs so my doctor recommended yoga." Deraspe said the type of yoga they teach is more of a mindful concept. "Hatha is a general term for physical yoga," she said. Green Tree also offers children's camp programs and women's dance and hopes to be the seed money for future outreach programs such as health care clinics and organic food farming. "Our mission," said Michelle, is to offer yoga and meditation to the South Los Angeles community and beyond regardless of income allowing that which connects us to flourish and to dissolve that which separates us." For more information, visit www.greentreeyogameditation.org or call: 310-710-0744. generalinfo@lasentinel.net
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What Is #Yoga? | @castellani http://sco.lt/...

What Is #Yoga? | @castellani http://sco.lt/... | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
What Is #Yoga?
Brian Castellani's insight:
The Yoga Sutras of Patanjali which are thought to have been written some time between 100 BCE and 500 CE. In this text there are 8 “limbs” of yoga: Yama the five abstentions: how we relate to the external world. Ahimsa: non-violence, inflicting no injury or harm to others or to one’s self. Satya: truth in word and thought. Asteya: non-covetousness Brahmacharya: using sexual energy for connection to our spiritual self and not to use sexual energy in ways that might harm others. Also, responsible behavior with respect to our goal of moving toward the truth. Aparigraha: non-possessiveness; non-hoarding Niyama the five observances: how we relate to ourselves, the inner world. Shaucha: cleanliness of body and mind. Santosha: satisfaction; satisfied with what one has. Tapas: austerity and associated observances for body discipline and thereby mental control. Svadhyaya: study of the Vedic scriptures to know about God and the soul, which leads to introspection on a greater awakening to the soul and God within, Ishvarapranidhana: surrender to (or worship of) God. Asana: Discipline of the body: rules and postures to keep it disease-free and for preserving vital energy. Correct postures are a physical aid to meditation, for they control the limbs and nervous system and prevent them from producing disturbances. Pranayama: control of life force energies. Pratyahara: withdrawal of senses from their external objects. Dharana: concentration upon a physical object, such as a flame of a lamp, the midpoint of the eyebrows, or the image of a deity. Dhyana: steadfast meditation. Samadhi: oneness with the object of meditation.
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Yoga Teacher Training India's curator insight, January 7, 1:59 PM

An insight about #Yoga 

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#Cats Doing #Yoga – the best pictures | @castellani http://sco.lt/...

#Cats Doing #Yoga – the best pictures | @castellani http://sco.lt/... | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
We asked you to share your photos of yoga-loving cats via GuardianWitness.
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#Cats Doing #Yoga – the best pictures | @castellani http://sco.lt/... We asked you to share your photos of yoga-loving cats via GuardianWitness.
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River of Life in Fort Washington to offer yoga designed for cancer patients ... - Montgomery Newspapers | @castellani http://sco.lt/...

River of Life in Fort Washington to offer yoga designed for cancer patients ... - Montgomery Newspapers | @castellani http://sco.lt/... | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
River of Life in Fort Washington to offer yoga designed for cancer patients ...
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River of Life in Fort Washington to offer yoga designed for cancer patients ...
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#BoxingYoga? It’s coming to Fort Point Channel, thanks to @GeorgeForeman III - @Bostondotcom | @indieyoga (@Castellani) #yoganomics http://sco.lt/...

#BoxingYoga? It’s coming to Fort Point Channel, thanks to @GeorgeForeman III - @Bostondotcom  | @indieyoga (@Castellani) #yoganomics http://sco.lt/... | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
The Boston Innovation District, or at least its edges, could soon be home to a luxury gym where George Foreman III plans to teach classes on the sweet science in new, innovative ways.
Brian Castellani's insight:
The Boston Innovation District, or at least its edges, could soon be home to a luxury gym where George Foreman III plans to teach classes on the sweet science in new, innovative ways to a membership likely to include off-duty entrepreneurs, biotech types, and folks who’ve put on too much weight at the many new restaurants on the South Boston Waterfront. In the eyes of George Foreman III (a son of the legendary prize fighter and pitchman George Foreman), boxing can be a core-fitness solution. And George III, who has a 16-O boxing record himself, plans to teach courses at the new gym with titles such as Boxing Yoga, Fight Cycle, and Box-FIIT, which stands for “fight intensity interval training,” his company said. The company says the gym will also feature a “spa-like locker room” and “a chic luxury fitness experience.” The plan is for a December opening of the Club by George Foreman III at 15 Channel Center St. in the Fort Point neighborhood in December. But a drive to sign up members is about to get underway Wednesday. Membership rates can go for $100 to $130 a month, and interested parties can sign up at the club’s website, www.everybodyfights.com. A club press release says, “George will be there every day to train with his members.” Folks who sign up early could become part of the “First 500,” and they will have the opportunity to “throw the first punch in George’s fight to synthesize the world’s best workout with a chic luxury fitness experience women and men of all ages can enjoy.” In a statement, George Foreman III said of boxing: “Anyone can do it, and everyone will enjoy it. Our core ethos is: Everybody Fights! So, my facility will be equipped with amenities and workouts that everyone can enjoy. Regardless of gender or age, I believe that the boxing workout is for everyone, and the first 500 individuals who embark on this journey with me to prove it will be rewarded with generous lifetime discounts on everything including their monthly membership dues.” Foreman, 30, has some ties to Massachusetts, attending Fay School in Southborough. While there, he became friends with fellow student Anthony Rich. A Boston resident, Rich is a business partner with Foreman in the Club by George Foreman III. Chris Reidy
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#Yoga can help improve employee wellbeing - 9/1/2013 - @PersonnelToday

#Yoga can help improve employee wellbeing - 9/1/2013 - @PersonnelToday | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
Occupational-Health (Ask about our mobile yoga service for NEPA & LV groups/businesses:
Yoga can help improve employee wellbeing: http://t.co/RMXKtvnsOV)...
Brian Castellani's insight:

In the first of three articles about the use of alternative therapies in the workplace, Victoria Morrison looks at the health benefits of yoga for the working population.


Yoga developed in India about 5,000 years ago. It is a form of exercise with so many variations and adaptations that everyone can join a class or practise in their home and find a style that works for them.

According to Ross and Thomas (2010), yoga is designed to bring balance and health to the physical, mental, emotional and spiritual dimensions of an individual. The two main benefits for the working population are on the mind and on the body.

 

Mira Mehta (1994) says: "A powerful antidote to the stresses of modern-day life, yoga is a practical philosophy that aims to unite the body, mind and spirit for health and fulfilment. A fit and supple body can be developed through the practice of postures [that] work on all the bodily systems, toning the muscles, stimulating the circulation and improving overall health. The benefits are not just physical: as the postures are mastered and ­techniques introduced for relaxation and breath control, you will find that yoga has the power to calm the mind, increase your concentration and give the ability to cope with tension."

How yoga can help

Physically, there is so much that yoga can help with. It is widely accepted that we live in a fast-paced society, however, it is common for many people to be sitting down for most of the day. For example, in the car or on the bus or train on the way to and from work; then at a desk; then at home in front of the computer or in front of the television. This inactivity, coupled with wearing shoes with high heels, is likely to be a common cause of tight hamstrings, which often leads to other musculoskeletal problems.

Working at a computer for long periods is also known to cause tension in the shoulders and neck. Both office-based and manual workers can find themselves hunched and aching from bending over their work station if no ergonomic risk assessment has been undertaken. Other workers endure prolonged periods of standing, sometimes in one place.

 

Then there are the seemingly fitter manual workers, such as those in the building trade, who are constantly carrying heavy loads - often on uneven and unstable surfaces or up ladders with constant bending and straining. They may have back, neck and shoulder aches and pains. In 2009/10, the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) noted that an estimated 94,000 Britons suffered from a lower-limb disorder caused, or made worse, by their work.

 

Mentally, there is much that yoga can do to prevent these aches and pains and promote a better feeling of wellbeing.

 

Early starts, traffic jams, working through lunch, late finishing, shifts, constant change, fear of redundancy, deadlines and increased workloads all create stress. Many of the working population spend what could be free time, such as travel time and lunch breaks, on the telephone or on their tablets or laptops.

 

There is no time in the day to relax. Social lives are conducted via computers and telephone screens, and increasingly less through real conversations or face-to-face contact. In the West, we do not breathe "properly" and use a smaller percentage of our lung capacity than is ideal. Shallow breathing has physical and mental health implications, made worse by stress.

 

HSE statistics show that there were 428,000 reported cases of work-related stress in 2011/12, while "The Times of India" noted in a recent article that: "Moderate to severe stress impacts almost half of all workers while they are on the job... 66% of employers revealed that they find it difficult to focus on tasks because of stress ... employees also said that stress was responsible for errors and/or missed deadlines, trouble getting along with co-workers/superiors, missed days and lateness." This corresponds with HSE research published over the last decade.

While all yoga focuses on the mind and the body, some practices have a heavier focus on one area. Different types of yoga focus on different types of wellbeing, and some are more appropriate for the working population than others. In the US there are more than 30 types of yoga, but in the UK there are usually only four main types.

Ashtanga

This yoga type uses pre-determined sets of poses that are always the same and always performed in the same order.

It is quite physical and can be seen to balance both the ancient Indian practice of yoga with the modern Western need for physical exercise. There is constant movement from one posture to another and students move smoothly between the poses, breathing consciously as they do so. There are six levels so that students can build up in difficulty.

Iyengar

This is a strict form of yoga that pays attention to the detail in postures and focuses on body alignment. Poses are held for longer periods of time and there is rarely any flow between the poses. Props, such as blankets, blocks and straps, are used to aid good alignment.

Bikram

Practised in a hot room, some classes use a set series of 26 moves, but some do not. It encourages sweating as a form of cleansing and is said to loosen tight muscles.

Hatha

This is less of an actual style and more of a class description. Hatha yoga can encompass any style or type of yoga. It is usually relatively gentle and a good introduction if you are new to yoga. It will often balance several different types of yoga and usually reflects the teacher's preferred style.

Ross and Thomas (2010) explore the various health benefits in their comparison study and conclude that yoga may be as effective as, or better than, other forms of exercise at improving a variety of health-related outcomes. Even the NHS advises that there is evidence that regular yoga practice is beneficial for people with high blood pressure, heart disease, aches and pains (including low back pain), depression and stress. It also says that some research suggests that yoga can reduce pain and mobility problems in people with osteoarthritis of the knee.

On a simple level, yoga stretches and strengthens various body parts depending on the posture performed. The "warrior" postures, for example, are physically very challenging. The benefits on the body - as listed in Kappmeier and ­Ambrosini (2006) - are that it:

strengthens the lower extremities, particularly the thighs;stabilises the hips and knees;builds strength and endurance;improves flexibility and stamina in the spine;opens and strengthens the musculature of the hips;tones the lower extremities;continues to work on the subtle alignments of the upper body and opening and strengthening of the shoulder joints;builds muscular endurance;tones the abdominal muscles;promotes awareness of proper hip alignment; andimproves balance.

Other postures are thought to aid specific ailments. Some are ­particularly good at aiding gynaecological issues such as a prolapsed uterus, infertility or pre-menstrual tension.

Almost all of the postures work to tone the back and abdominal areas, which will help to reduce back problems."

Yogatutor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

All yoga has some focus on toning of the pelvic floor. Geeta S Iyengar, daughter to BKS Iyengar - a leading authority on yoga - specialises in aligning yoga practice with the menstrual cycle and, along with some of her colleagues, has written articles on the subject of women's yoga, and yoga and motherhood.

 

There has been a recent upsurge in pregnancy and postnatal yoga classes, some of which allow the mother to bring the baby along with her. These classes are especially important to the modern working woman as there is an emphasis on relaxation, meditation and breathing to help dissipate stress and tension.

 

Additionally, a whole host of yoga postures are good for digestion. This is important for modern working people as digestive disorders can be caused by stress or poor diet, which can be a result of busy working lifestyles.

 

The Yogatutor website says: "Several asanas and ...pranayamas [breathing exercises] ... are of great benefit to digestion and metabolic health. Digestion can be acutely affected by stress and tension within the abdominal region. So too, tension and stiffness in the lumbar area (lower back) can lead to constipation and impaired digestive function. Therefore, Hatha yoga practices can provide great benefit to digestive health.

"Almost all of the postures work to tone the back and abdominal areas, which will help to reduce back problems. In a balanced class, as teachers, we aim to work the spine in every direction."

 

Geoffrey Podger, chief executive of the Health and Safety Executive, says: "Back pain will affect as many as four out of five people in Britain and

results in 4.5 million days off from work every year."

 

With an ageing population and workforce, yoga can be really beneficial. Two common ailments in older workers are back pain and lack of balance, but these are also not uncommon in younger workers who are in their late teens or 20s, on whom poor posture and a lack of physical exercise are taking their toll. This is exacerbated by the fact that this has probably been the case all their lives. Yoga's focus on core strength can help prevent backache from occurring and ease the symptoms if it does.

Mental wellbeing

Moving onto the non-physical benefits, Swami Satyananda Saraswati introduces yoga by saying: "It works on all aspects of the person: physical, vital, mental, emotional, psychic and spiritual" (2009).

While explaining the relevance of yoga for today, he states: "According to medical scientists, yoga is successful because [of] the balance created in the nervous and endocrine systems, which directly influence all the other systems and organs of the body."

 

During the physical postures, students are often encouraged to move with their breathing, which creates longer, deeper breaths. While focusing in this way, it helps to calm any chatter in the mind. In many classes, specific breathing exercises are included and some include meditation, which helps with focus, concentration and de-stressing. Almost all classes end with some form of relaxation. This is hugely beneficial to everyone. It is surprising how many people find this the most difficult part of the class because they find switching off challenging.

 

Alongside all the evidence of yoga being able to aid or cure us of physical, medical and emotional problems, what else might persuade someone into a class? Contrary to popular belief, you do not need to be fit or flexible. Unlike tough cardiovascular workouts offered by gyms and dance classes, there is less focus on working the heart and lungs in yoga. If you are after a cardiovascular workout, however, when postures are practised in quick succession, your heart rate will definitely increase.

 

You do not need any level of flexibility to practise yoga. The idea is that it will increase your flexibility. Generally speaking, those "yogis" who can perform the most contortionist of poses could not before they started practising beginner's yoga, and everyone must start somewhere. Flexibility comes with time and practice (and genetics).

 

The nature of yoga - moving slowly and consciously in and out of poses - means there is a lower chance of injury. Participants are encouraged to work within their own personal comfort levels, holding stretches for the right amount of time for them personally, and never to the extent of experiencing discomfort or pain. If someone has previously had an injury or is worried about developing one, then yoga is a good option.

It is surprising how many people find relaxation the most difficult part of the class because they find switching off challenging."

    Relaxation

The benefit of yoga over other ­conventional exercise is that the postures focus on every single part of the body. There is usually some focus on the mind and breathing, even if it is not obvious, although some classes do focus solely on this. Almost all classes include beneficial (and much needed) relaxation techniques and exercises.

Many forms of modern exercise consist of the very stresses and strains that we are trying to eliminate. Participants listen to loud music and move at a fast pace.

 

While working our muscles, many modern classes do not stretch them, and worse still they can simply make them tighter and shorter. It is also so often competitive, with participants wanting to go faster, further or heavier.

Classes are squeezed into lunch breaks or ­before work, leaving even less time to be calm and quiet. Sessions are also getting shorter, often lasting between 30 and 45 minutes, compared with the traditional hour lunch break.

 

This means less time for stretching at the end. Yoga, on the other hand, has longer class times - they are usually for a ­minimum of an hour but can often last up to two hours.

 

One of my own participants distinguished between the two types of class by telling me: "I can look forward to yoga rather than dread it like when I'm due to go to the gym or for a run."

 

Looking forward to a class that works your body and your mind makes yoga perfect for the working population.


Victoria Morrison Bsc is a health and fitness professional and qualified yoga instructor.

References

Ross A, Thomas S (2010). "The health benefits of yoga and exercise: a review of comparison studies". The Journal of Alternative and Complementary Medicine; vol.16, no.1; pp. 3-12.

 

Mehta M (1994). How to Use Yoga. London; Annes Publishing Ltd.

Kappmeier KL, Ambrosini DM (2006). Instructing Hatha Yoga. Champaign USA; Human Kinetics.

 

Iyengar GS (1983). Yoga: A Gem for Women. Mumbai India; Allied Publishers Pvt Ltd.

 

Saraswati SS (2009). Asana Pranayama Mudra Bandha. New Delhi India; Thomas Press (India) Ltd.

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Reach of #Yoga ! Nessecity in today's life !!

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Rage, fear, sadness, fatigue. The #yoga of darkness. | @castellani http://sco.lt/...

Rage, fear, sadness, fatigue.  The #yoga of darkness. | @castellani http://sco.lt/... | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
“Emotion is the chief source of all becoming-conscious. There can be no transforming of darkness into light and of apathy into movement without emotion.” -Carl Jung. I once had a student who starte...
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“Emotion is the chief source of all becoming-conscious. There can be no transforming of darkness into light and of apathy into movement without emotion.” -Carl Jung. I once had a student who starte...
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#Landmark Forum's "next generation." Take someone else's #idea. 1 Minute Mediation.

#Landmark Forum's "next generation." Take someone else's #idea. 1 Minute Mediation. | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
Chip Wilson and his wife Shannon say their one-minute meditation technique helps professionals become more focused and productive.
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#Lululemon's Billionaire took someone else's idea. 1 Minute Mediation His Next Big Project

 

At first glance, whil is perplexing. It's not a business or a product. It isn't really a charity. Best-described, it is a mission.

 

Billionaire Chip Wilson, founder and chairman of yoga-inspired athletic apparel company Lululemon, and his wife Shannon (formerly Lululemon's lead designer) recently launched the whil initiative and website to convince professionals to meditate a few times a day in increments of just 60 seconds.


In today's digital age, where business leaders are increasingly overwhelmed with work, technology, and social media, they are advocating for a simple way to become more productive: to shut down briefly, figure out what's really important, and make a plan. 

"Technology is moving so quickly, and there's so much coming at people that you can be ineffective and overwhelmed by it," Shannon tells Business Insider. "We felt like we needed something for people to work into their lives every day. You can do it in your office or in your car when you're not driving. Everybody's got one minute in their day."

The goal isn't to build another business, but to bring a tool that's worked for them to as many people and businesses as they can to help them become happier and more productive.


To that end, they've created the website whil.com to outline their take on meditation and offer examples of how people have successfully applied the technique. 

 

It's pretty minimalist compared to how people usually think of meditating. You shut your eyes, "power down" your brain, and empty your mind. While taking deep breaths, commit to one or two essential priorities you'll focus on in the next few hours. And all of that happens inside a minute.


This strategy came from the extremely busy lives of its originators. "At Lululemon, I was like a fish who couldn't see the water," Chip tells us. "I couldn't really see how fast the company was growing. It was just unbelievable. There was so much coming at me that there was no time to cool down [and] prioritize the next few hours."

Since it's so easy to get caught up in the daily grind, both Chip and Shannon use "triggers" to remind them to meditate consistently. For Chip, it's going to the bathroom. For Shannon, it's each time she gets into her car. 


In part, the decision to spread this message came from seeing the massive amounts of stress people in the business world are now under. 

 

"When we were here in 2007 doing the IPO for Lululemon, we saw all these analysts — these 30 to 40-year-old guys working 24/7 — and they threw their whole lives into it," Chip says. "Combined with how social media and technology is going, the amount of information they're getting is leading to burnout."


The key to convincing people to try meditation is making it more accessible. The biggest misconception the pair runs into, Shannon says, is that meditation can only be done in certain spaces or in a certain way for hours at a time. 


"What we're hoping to do with whil is to demystify it," she says, "so people go, 'OK, I can do a minute. I can work that into my life.'" 

While meditation hasn't yet become mainstream, if there's one thing Chip's good at, it's spotting a trend. His first business, Westbeach, sold for $15 million after he was one of the first to spot the growing demand for surf, ski, and snowboard apparel. Lululemon was far ahead of the game when it came to yoga. They think meditation's at the same stage.


"If I look back at where yoga started in 1998, it was never in a hotel, never in a workplace, no one ever talked about it," Chip says. "And where it is now, I think we can see the same growth rate for meditation."



Read more: http://www.businessinsider.com/chip-wilson-lululemon-meditation-whil-2013-10#ixzz2hTTv4JBG

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Oktoberfest, yoga and a walking ghost tour - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (blog)

Oktoberfest, yoga and a walking ghost tour - Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (blog) | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
Oktoberfest, yoga and a walking ghost tour
Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (blog)
On Tap this Weekend: Oktoberfest, yoga and a walking ghost tour. By Heather Ronaldson of the Journal Sentinel. Oct. 11, 2013 3:45 p.m..
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In case you missed it: While filming for an upcoming segment on Milwaukee's best trivia nights, On Tap this Weekend met some new friends at Stubby's Gastrogrub & Beer Bar. We know it's a quirky video, but this is the entertainment section, after all.  

Read more from Journal Sentinel: http://www.jsonline.com/blogs/entertainment/227431641.html#ixzz2hTKLKvYT ;
Follow us: @NewsHub on Twitter


oktoberfest milwaukee : milwaukee art museum yoga : milwaukee events 

Read more from Journal Sentinel: http://www.jsonline.com/blogs/entertainment/227431641.html#ixzz2hTKQ7ZlQ ;
Follow us: @NewsHub on Twitter

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#Yoga for #Veterans - Positively #Naperville Events

#Yoga for #Veterans - Positively #Naperville Events | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
This hour-long class is suitable for both beginners and for those with some experience and will include basic breathing exercises, foundational poses, sun salutations, and deep relaxation.
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This hour-long class is suitable for both beginners and for those with some experience and will include basic breathing exercises, foundational poses, sun salutations, and deep relaxation.

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Modern Yoga Poses.

Modern Yoga Poses. | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
Smoking Break Sun Salutation

1. Stand tall outside your office building during break.

2. Position unlit cigarette between first and second fingers of right hand; grasp lighter in left hand.

3. Drop head forward until forehead touches knee

4. Extend arms forward, flicking lighter. Slowly rise, clasp hands together and light cigarette.

5. Place cigarette in mouth and inhale; cough on exhale

6. Focus on the release of tension attained through the power of totally organic nicotine.

 

Namaste.

Brian Castellani's insight:
Sad Fish

NOTE: This yoga pose should be used only as a last resort, like after an animated “conversation” with your ex regarding money, or the morning after a Feisty Goat.


1. Lock the bathroom door.

2. Insert earplugs.

3. Fill the tub.

4. Use your rolled-up yoga mat to wipe up puddles.

5. Crawl into tub.

6. Put on a snorkel.

7. Submerge completely.

8. Breathe deeply.

9. Tension in your throbbing temples might or might not go away, but there’s nothing good on television so it’s worth a shot.

10. Do not break this pose until you’re goddamn good and ready.

 

Namaste.

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James Morrison: My #Yoga Story @JamesPMorrison @ShowingUpMovie

James Morrison: My #Yoga Story @JamesPMorrison @ShowingUpMovie | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it

My Yoga Story with James Morrison 

 

Or, What I Did, Have Done and Am Doing On My Yoga Vacation

 

I started flirting with yoga while I was in high school. The attraction was purely physical. I would take a copy of The Complete Illustrated Book of Yoga by Swami Vishnudevananda into my room, lock the door, and practice as many of the postures as I could. I skimmed the parts about philosophy, diet, astral bodies, etc. but it was the physical postures that intrigued me most. I wanted to beat old age - the book promised it would help me do that - and thirty wasn't that far off.

Brian Castellani's insight:
Or, What I Did, Have Done and Am Doing On My Yoga Vacation

I started flirting with yoga while I was in high school. The attraction was purely physical. I would take a copy of The Complete Illustrated Book of Yoga by Swami Vishnudevananda into my room, lock the door, and practice as many of the postures as I could. I skimmed the parts about philosophy, diet, astral bodies, etc. but it was the physical postures that intrigued me most. I wanted to beat old age - the book promised it would help me do that - and thirty wasn't that far off.

 

One night a friend of mine and I were talking with his absurdly serene older brother, who looked a lot like the hippie Jesus (long flowing hair, beard, thick robe, sandals and beatific smile) about his "exercises". He told us of his kriyas, his cleansing rituals. How he would floss his nasal passages with a cotton cloth and swim into the ocean, take his intestines out through his anus and wash them, then put them back. The later process, he warned, should never be attempted without the help of a Guru, and I believed him. He recounted, in the same peaceful manner, stories of how he reached blissful states of awareness and had serpents of energy coiling up and down his spine and lotus flowers sprouting out of his third eye while chanting in Sanskrit, the language of yoga. This blew my mind.

 

Clearly this yoga was even better than pot!

 

Still, I only dabbled in it for years, probably a little fearful I might get too serious and meet a Guru who would suggest we remove our intestines together. Without even knowing it, I was searching for something spiritual and being physical took me closer to it. I'd been a highly competitive athlete since I could remember, winning the President's Physical Fitness award in elementary school. I was a Little League and Babe Ruth All Star, and was first string on every team I tried out for, excelling at wrestling and track. I was even a boxer for a while. Well, a streetfighter, anyway. One of my older brothers and his hoodlum friends would pit me against bigger kids to see me get beat up while they drank beer and cheered me on. I'm sure this helped steer me toward non-violence, or, Ahimsa as it is called in Sanskrit.

 

Through the years, trudging the road of happy destiny as an actor, yoga has always been part of my training. But it wasn't until 1999, when I was forty-five and well into the old age I was convinced in high school that I could beat through a yoga practice, that I discovered it was more than just physical exercise. It became, through my first substantial encounter with a yoga teacher, a way of life.

 

My wife was pregnant with my son when I met Frank White. He was 78 years old at the time, and the picture of health and vitality. That wasn't always the case. Frank found yoga in his mid-sixties as a "walking question mark" as he put it. Fifty or more pounds overweight, heart problems plagued him - he smoked four packs a day - and was a serious drinker. He took the teacher training at the White Lotus Foundation in Santa Barbara and he was born again, sober and clean and on the yogic path. His resurrection was legendary. He started teaching free classes to senior citizens and AIDS patients and eventually became one of Los Angeles' most respected teachers. His classes were highly regarded for how challenging they were. If you wanted to see God - or your deity of choice - while having your ass handed to you, go to Frank's class. I stumbled in, just out of a horrific job in the theatre and demoralized by it. I was ecstatic about becoming a father, but needed to be shown the path of least resistance to the changes and challenges in store. Frank guided me toward my rebirth.

 

After two years of almost daily practice with him, he convinced me to train to become a teacher with Ganga White and Tracey Rich at White Lotus. Frank helped me put my practice in context: a purposeful life of service, lived fully, in the present and with conviction; in other words, no more dabbling. He was adamant that I pass it on or I couldn't keep it and that I could only really live it if I could give it. One of the greatest moments in my teaching life was the day he walked in to a class and sat and watched me lead a practice. It was the moment he promised would come; I was teaching him. The best teachers understand that day will come and make you believe it will happen. Then they are humble enough to let you know when it does. Frank always reminded me to look within, pass it on, and question authority. And he taught me how to breathe again, like a child, full of life and free. I practiced and taught along side him, until his death in 2005 at 85.

 

My relationship with Tracey and Ganga is unique and ultimately the most healthful in the way they regard the so-called "guru-disciple" dynamic. From the beginning, they introduced me to myself as my own guru and I was, therefore, able to stand along side them, rather than sit at their feet. That empowers a student more than any amount of knowledge that may pass between them. The pairing of these two charismatic artists, as teachers of teachers, is without equal. A poetic and beautiful soul, Tracey has the hypnotic gift of being able to convey the elegance of whatever subject she's exploring by how she talks about it like no one I've ever met. Ganga's anti-authoritarian approach to teaching is made even more alive and accessible through his dry wit and universality of experience. Together, they walk the Jnana yogic "path of knowledge" with eyes and minds open and a willingness to accept all who join them.

 

I've worked with some of the best actors in the business, but nothing compares to teaching alongside your teachers. I have taught with and assisted Tracey and Ganga in workshops and teacher trainings for a few years now. Sharing that role with those who've inspired us is the greatest gift we can get, it's the most meaningful professional collaboration we can have. The best way to deepen your understanding of something you are passionate about is to teach it. I've come to regard teaching as a gathering of fellow travelers on the journey between the head and the heart. I'm currently helping Yoga Works in Los Angeles design part of the teacher-training syllabus for new teachers on how they might best use their voices when they teach. The thrust of it is that any teachers' voice that reaches us on any significant level still resonates because it came from their heart, from their truest selves. When I'm at my best I'm speaking from my heart and allowing my head to listen. I'm observing my most genuine self be revealed. As someone blessed enough to make a living as an actor - an instrument of illusion - I'm constantly searching for balance through that which is real or genuine. Home and family comes first. But I've come to know that it doesn't get much more real than when, as a teacher, you are attending someone and they experience even a momentary realization of their potential for change, their truest voice. It compares to fatherhood in making you a possibilist.

 

My own yoga practice now is to be as present, curious, patient, attentive and persistent as I can be. That's my meditation practice, and as Ganga suggests it should be, it's one of being rather than doing, so it's liquid, very flexible. Mostly it involves teaching and learning tolerance. That means, I suppose, that regardless of our beliefs, as observers we can partake in another's need for doing without participation and with sophisticated judgment. In other words, without doing, just being and observing. Since enlightenment - or just seeing things as they are as the Buddhist sages tell us - is something we slip in and out of, I'm content when I get an occasional glimpse. The hardest part of my life now is observing the intermittent battle between my enlightened and unenlightened selves. The street fight between the kid being egged on by the drunken delinquents and the man I aspire to be, the man I know I am. It's a fight that keeps me from accepting and surrendering to the good in life - at the same time showing me the good in life - and I'm not sure it's winnable. It's Sisyphean. But, thankfully, it's constant and keeps pushing me up the hill to my physical practice, even though that stems more, even still, from my addiction to competition and beating old age.

 

One day recently after a class at the Center for Yoga, I was sitting on the steps putting my shoes on, rather dejected, approaching despondency. I know I don't have to be perfect to be effective, I learned that from my yoga practice, but during class, I had some alarming revelations about my aging body. Another teacher, a friend, sat down next to me and asked why I appeared so glum and I told him, "I'm not able to do some of the things I used to be able to do in my practice." He smiled, the same absurdly serene smile all those yogis get when they're ready to remind you what you've momentarily forgotten, and said, "It's a good thing we know that's not what yoga is all about."

 

Nothing I've found changes you quite like yoga does. How then can we not be open to changing our ideas about what yoga is and how we do it as we continue to practice and study? Beyond the holistic health gains through diet, increased strength and flexibility and calm and focus I've acquired through my yoga practice, I've learned moderation. I mean that more in terms of presiding over my life. This doesn't mean I've gained more control over my life as much as it means I've learned what I can and can't control. Through my yoga practice, I've been given the tools to observe more clearly and gauge my responses more accurately. I've learned how to control what I think and how I think it. As my chiropractor told me while treating me for a back injury brought on by too much yoga, "Yogis get more injuries than most people, but they heal faster, too." Through my practice, the healing is relentless.

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How #yoga is helping prisoners stay calm @bbc6music | #TimMansel: @castellani http://sco.lt/...

How #yoga is helping prisoners stay calm @bbc6music | #TimMansel: @castellani http://sco.lt/... | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
Prison authorities around the world are waking up to the possible benefits of yoga, providing classes in the hope of keeping prisoners focused.
Brian Castellani's insight:
How yoga is helping prisoners stay calm By Tim Mansel BBC News 3 hours ago Very little research has been done into the value of yoga and meditation in prisons - but many prisoners have found they help overcome the stresses and strains of life behind bars. Prison authorities too are waking up to the possible benefits, providing classes in the hope of fostering a calm and positive atmosphere. The precision of the poses is remarkable - and for Nick, a man in his early 40s, apparently effortless. We're in a small yoga studio above a pub in west London, daylight filtering in through slatted blinds. Nick holds Warrior 2 - arms stretched horizontally, one knee bent, one straight behind him Then he offers to demonstrate a handstand, and lifts himself on the palms of his hands, knees and feet together. He is a model of balance and control. "That's six years in prison," he grins. Prison was Villa Devoto, in Buenos Aires, Argentina. "It was the worst place I had seen in my life," Nick says. "They don't have cells, they have open wings, where you can have anything from 100 to 400 people per wing. There were no beds so you'd literally be like sardines sleeping on the floor." He demonstrates this, lying on his side on his yoga mat, his head propped on his hand. Nick was no innocent. Together with a friend, he'd run a highly successful business smuggling cocaine supplied from Colombia to Europe. They were multi-millionaires. "We basically built up an empire on drug money. Most of it was laundered in Argentina. We opened a night club, had restaurants, jewellery shops, cars, boats, houses, villas," he says. This all came to a sudden end one night in 2004 as Nick was leaving his night club and walked into a police ambush. It turned out that he'd been under surveillance for two years. He was given a 10-year prison sentence. "In the beginning it was quite hard," he says. An uprising at Villa Devoto (1996) "Every week someone was killed, so you saw a lot of mindless violence, beyond what I'd ever, ever experienced in England, people with machetes, guns, lances. You'd literally see people being mutilated and cut to pieces and stabbed to pieces. "In the prisons all the gangs would stick together. As we were a quite well-known English firm in Argentina we had a lot of Colombian contacts, so we were taken into a Colombian gang." Nick lived on the open wings for about a year, until he and his co-defendant were transferred, by order of a judge, to a cell on their own. "That was a really hard test," he says. "Because we'd gone from a life of madness to one of complete isolation, where there was nothing. We were literally just in a room with two beds and a table. "And that was then when I got into yoga." Nick discovered yoga by chance, through a book his cellmate had bought as a present for his girlfriend. What Nick didn't know then was that yoga is slowly being recognised by prison authorities all over the world as an activity beneficial to individual inmates and, by extension, to the institutions themselves. In the UK a charity was founded in 1988 with the purpose of bringing yoga and the related discipline of meditation into prisons. It is called the Prison Phoenix Trust and today it operates in about 80 prisons, either running classes or sending inmates books and CDs. "We're really responding to a need the prisoners are expressing for something to help them with the tremendous amount of mental strain and mental pressure that they're under," says Sam Settle, the charity's director. And at a prison in Chengdu, China (2010) Where the Prison Phoenix Trust operates independently, funded exclusively by donations, in Sweden yoga has become integral to the prison system. The Swedish prison service employs a national yoga co-ordinator, whose job, among other things, is to train prison guards as yoga teachers. The prison in Ystad in southern Sweden occupies a group of low brick buildings surrounded by fences topped with razorwire, on the edge of a town that is unusually well-known for a place with fewer than 20,000 inhabitants - Ystad is where Henning Mankell set his series of novels about the troubled detective Kurt Wallander. This is a women's prison, one of five in Sweden, with 65 inmates serving anything between a month or two and life. The women occupy single cells, furnished with a bed, desk and chair. Each has a toilet en suite. One inmate from Costa Rica says she burst into tears on arrival, astonished at such luxury. Villa Devoto this is not. A corridor leads from the main entrance through a series of locked doors past the kitchen to the workshop area where the women assemble plastic components for the plumbing trade. Further on, in what used to be a greenhouse, a group of women lying on mats are being guided through a series of breathing exercises. The wooden floor has been specially installed. Soothing music plays softly. Afterwards the women talk willingly about their experience of prison - Annika, for example, who's in her 40s and serving a sentence of 20 months. "This is a hard life in here," she says. "And 90% of the people who are in here have drug problems, so if they come in here and they cut their drugs the same day, then you can imagine how they feel. And they get sick because they don't get their pills and they get mad and they lose their temper, for nothing." The governor, Viktoria Rydholm, paints a picture of women arriving in prison under enormous stress. Many have left children behind. A lot of them are addicts, facing the prospect of a spell without recourse to narcotics, so they seek solace in prescription drugs. "There's a huge intake of painkillers here," she says. "And there's a lot of medication for the stomach, and for everything else. The women just want anything to kill their anxiety." Yoga, she says, has made it easier for the prison staff to motivate the women to change the behaviour that has brought them to prison in the first place. In other group activities, she says, there is often trouble, quarrelling. "But when they are together in yoga, it's never any problem. Not once during these years has there been a problem with that." Has it had a calming effect on the prison as a whole? "There are no statistics, but I think that's the case. I think we have a calmer environment within the prison, because people themselves are calmer." Meditation, too, has been taking hold in prisons from as far afield as Alabama in the US, and Burma. There the artist Htein Lin, arrested on political charges in the late 1990s, found himself sentenced to a seven-year prison term, most of which he spent on death row in Myaung Mya prison. "It was very dark and gloomy, and because it was built a very long time ago the roof used to leak, so the floor was always wet - and we had to sleep on the floor," he says. "There was no toilet, and one water pot, outside the cell." Like Nick Brewer, Htein Lin got hold of a book - though on meditation rather than yoga. He began to teach himself, despite the attempts of other prisoners to distract him. "They were very dangerous. Some of them were murderers. Some of them had raped children. The only thing they talked about was crime, and they tried constantly to interrupt me while I was meditating." He says the guards also were suspicious, but very gradually things began to change. Htein Lin won the trust of one inmate by offering to teach him to read and write. Then others began to express interest in meditation. Eventually he felt able to approach the prison authorities to ask if they might keep the cell doors open while they meditated. The governor agreed - an astonishing change of policy. "Before the doors had to be kept closed because if they were opened the prisoners would literally have killed each other," says Htein Lin. "Now the cell doors were open all day. They were only locked at night." The prisoners, he said, would come to his cell one by one and meditate with him on a blanket spread on the floor. "Some of them meditated for half an hour, some for an hour. That way we all had a chance to meditate." There has been relatively little research into the effects of yoga in prison, so much of what is reported is anecdotal only. But two academics at Oxford University recently published the results of a study conducted among inmates in seven prisons in Britain, which they say does show that yoga and meditation in prison can have profound benefits. Miguel Farias and Amy Bilderbeck constructed their study based both on a questionnaire and a computer task that tested responses to a simple instruction. The prisoners were divided into two groups - one attended a 10-week course in yoga and meditation, the other simply carried out an exercise routine. While the questionnaire results pointed to the positive effects of yoga, it was the scores provided by the computer task, testing impulsivity and attention, that convinced the academics that they were really on to something. Nick, who spent six years in Villa Devoto, has no scientific evidence to offer. But he's convinced that yoga saved his life. "If it wasn't for prison I wouldn't have got involved in yoga, I wouldn't be the person that I am today. I would probably be dead," he says. "At one point I actually became grateful for being in prison because I could feel this massive evolution, this change that was happening within me through yoga. So I almost became like a grateful convict, happy to be where I was, paying the time for my crime and rehabilitating myself." The one-time millionaire drugs baron with Porsches and speedboats and a glitzy Buenos Aires night club today runs a modest first-floor yoga studio on a quiet West London street. He rides a small motor scooter, with a big smile. You can hear more in Isolation, which is broadcast on the BBC World Service this weekend, September 28 and 29
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GURU #Ramdev detained at #London #airport, released | @castellani http://sco.lt/...

GURU #Ramdev detained at #London #airport, released | @castellani http://sco.lt/... | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
Yoga guru says authorities did not tell him why he was held by customs officials
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Yoga guru says authorities did not tell him why he was held by customs officials IANS September 21, 2013 New Delhi: Yoga guru Baba Ramdev, who was detained at Heathrow airport in London for eight hours by British customs officials, was released on Saturday. Ramdev’s spokesman S.K. Tejarawala said, he was neither asked any question nor his luggage was checked. He said: “Swamiji felt harassment there.” Ramdev was reportedly questioned by the customs officials as he travelled to Britain on a visitor visa instead of a business visa, and he was also questioned about certain medicines he was carrying with him. Tejarawala said: “He (Ramdev) asked several times to immigration authorities why he was detained as he had done no crime or illegal thing in his life, but the authorities kept mum and replied nothing.” “Swamiji was carrying only four set of clothes and a diary containing facts and figure related to his agitation and movement, and ved mantras in Sanskrit and Hindi.” “This incident is a case of gross insult to the pride and prestige of 125 crore Indians. Swamiji had visited several times to UK in last seven years and conducted many Yoga camps,” he said in a statement. Ramdev visited London to attend a function organised by the Patanjali Yogpeeth on the 120th anniversary of Swami Vivekananda’s from then Bombay Port to Chicago.
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#LongBeach #yogis twisted by red tape - @OCRegister | @castellani http://sco.lt/...

#LongBeach #yogis twisted by red tape - @OCRegister  | @castellani http://sco.lt/... | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
Long Beach yogis twisted by red tape OCRegister (subscription) The sound of traffic on Second Street was almost a distant, soothing buzz from Alamitos Bay, where a group of about 20 people gathered to practice yoga in the sand on a sunny Friday...
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Long Beach yogis twisted by red tape OCRegister (subscription) The sound of traffic on Second Street was almost a distant, soothing buzz from Alamitos Bay, where a group of about 20 people gathered to practice yoga in the sand on a sunny Friday...
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#GA Local instructor gives #veterans peace through #yoga - Newnan @Time-Herald | @castellani #yoganomics http://sco.lt/...

#GA Local instructor gives #veterans peace through #yoga - Newnan @Time-Herald | @castellani #yoganomics http://sco.lt/... | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
Newnan Times-Herald Local instructor gives veterans peace through yoga Newnan Times-Herald Moments are processed as tweets and cable news tickers. It's an era when we're all relying more on technology than our bodies.
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“It blew me away. I loved it… it was a head thing, it was a spiritual thing.” As the wife of a retired infantry marine, Dorsey immediately saw the potential for yoga to reach and help combat veterans like her husband, Josh Dorsey (vice president of Glock Inc). Prompted by this desire to help, Dorsey went into teacher training just over a year after doing yoga for the first time. The opportunity to teach yoga to veterans allows Dorsey to bring not only physical fitness but a way to cope and heal damaged psyches. While the vast physical effects of yoga are a given, such as flexibility, strength and balance, the mental aspect is still elusive to many unfamiliar with the physiology behind it. When considering the balance between the physical and mental, Dorsey reminds that in Hindu, yoga means “union,” and that just the simplest and most natural act is an act of both body and mind harmony: breathing. “What I love about yoga is it just teaches you how to calm down,” Dorsey says. “It’s all about breathing. Your body slows its breathing down and that signals to your nervous system in your brain that everything is okay.” Dorsey sees yoga as a way for people to positively and healthily deal ease their anxieties and depression. According to Dorsey, society now is so quick to jump to medicine as the solution for a cluttered mind but many medications bring about negative side effects and are simply mimicking chemicals already present in your body. To her, yoga provides an alternative that naturally taps into the clearing of bad thought pollution. “You can go to lunch with friends and drive away thinking nobody really listened to you or heard what was on your heart. After yoga class, you should feel like somebody heard you and that’s yourself.” Dorsey’s energy is contagious. She’s thoughtful, friendly and well spoken. Her teaching style is comforting and constructive. Despite her profession requiring so much tranquil spirituality, the Dorsey between classes is amazingly grounded. She can guide you through a warrior pose that completely frees your mind, then sit down with you five minutes later and discuss life in Newnan. She and her family initially came to Newnan to find a slower pace of living. “We came from Connecticut, which was very congested, down to Newnan,” she says of her family’s search for more freedom and privacy. “We live at the end of a dirt road. We love it. We have chickens, dogs that roam. It’s a lovely place to live.” After five years of what she calls a “mobile studio” — stocking up her Prius with mats and equipment and rolling from center to club to the Newnan Carnegie Library — Dorsey is opening her own studio later this month. She is understandably nervous and excited to own her studio, a place where she can centrally foster an enthusiastic and growing yoga community. Dorsey jokes that when she wakes up in intermittent terror over having her own studio, “that’s when the breathing starts.” From broken bones in 2007 to E-RYT 500 just this spring, Dorsey is grateful for yoga’s monumental impact. “For the first time in my life, I feel like I’ve got it all together. My head’s not battling my body and my body’s not battling my head,” asserts Dorsey to the profound effects of yoga. “I’m in a really good place spiritually.”
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#TomLescher @kaypachafest #Astrology Forecast for #September 11, 2013 | @castellani #yoganomics http://sco.lt/...

#TomLescher @kaypachafest #Astrology Forecast for #September 11, 2013 | @castellani #yoganomics http://sco.lt/... | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
I have a right to be angry and get fired up, When giving voice to the Goddess whose had enough. For by piercing the silence imposed from without, We create a...
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I have a right to be angry and get fired up, When giving voice to the Goddess whose had enough. For by piercing the silence imposed from without, We create a new world worth shouting about! This week is all about 11′s, a master number to help us clean up some of the messes around here! We are all being called to task these days and it can be hard. It is a time to face the wind as strong, cold, or hard as it is and with determination forge a new world order (beginning with our own inner reality, then close relationships, then larger and larger circles of influence). The challenge afforded us through these times is to integrate the feminine qualities of softness, feeling, and inclusiveness into our personal and social lives. The old, easy way is when the going gets tough, we turn callous, cold, and hard….. let’s see if that can change into a strength that includes rather than excludes the wisdom of the feminine. In this report I mentioned a Lilith webinar I am giving as part of the EA network and a series I will be offering next month titled “Relationship and Intimacy in the Horoscope.” I also mentioned the work of Mark Josephs-Serra that can be found at www.socialalchemy.eu
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#Yoga May Improve Quality Of #Sleep For #Cancer Patients - #Health - @yoganomics

#Yoga May Improve Quality Of #Sleep For #Cancer Patients - #Health - @yoganomics | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it

Cancer survivors who suffer from insomnia could improve the quality of their sleep if they started regularly practicing yoga, according to new research appearing in a recent edition of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.


Via Susan Zager
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Cancer survivors who suffer from insomnia could improve the quality of their sleep if they started regularly practicing yoga, according to new research appearing in a recent edition of the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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@IndieJenFischer: #Y is for #Yoga | Commentary by Jennifer Fischer - #SCVNEWS

@IndieJenFischer: #Y is for #Yoga | Commentary by Jennifer Fischer - #SCVNEWS | IndependentYoga | Scoop.it
SCVNEWS.com
ABCs of the SCV: Y is for Yoga | Commentary by Jennifer Fischer
SCVNEWS.com
JenniferFischer Wow – I can't believe the ABCs of the SCV are this close to being wrapped up.
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Wow – I can’t believe the ABCs of the SCV are this close to being  wrapped up. For Y, I knew I definitely wanted to do “yoga,” as it something I find helpful for strength training, relaxation and centering myself – as well as stretching out my achy back every now and then.

I also enjoy introducing my sons to yoga and seeing how much fun they have doing yoga with Mommy. They especially like it when I make “tunnels” for them to crawl through. (Downward dog is their favorite tunnel, and it was the first pose that Sky, now almost 4, ever did, well before he even turned 2.)

 

As for yoga in the Santa Clarita Valley, I practice yoga at home right now, given my schedule and the convenience of it. But I have attended yoga classes in the past at Yoga Yoga in Newhall and Yogaworks.

I loved the restorative class I used to attend regularly at Yoga Yoga, and I enjoyed my one-week free trial at Yogaworks. But yoga at home simply works best for me.

 

A friend is attending a new yoga studio in Newhall called Vayu Yoga, which is on Main Street in Old Town Newhall. Their focus is suspended yoga, and my friend is enjoying it. She shared that this Saturday, they will have a low-back/hips workshop at 3:15 p.m. that still has openings – or it did when I wrote this.

 

This same friend also shared some great yoga tips. I love all of the tips she has shared and find them to be helpful and true for me – so now I’m sharing them with you.

 

Tips for going to a yoga studio:

* Arrive early so that you do not disturb others’ practice.

* Turn off your cell phone, or even better, leave it at home or in your trunk on the way to and from yoga. This will help you prepare for and maintain the peace and “in the moment” mindfulness that yoga encourages.

* Be careful not to walk on other people’s mats. (They do put their faces on them.)

* Yoga in the studio strengthens your home practice.

Tips for practicing yoga at home:

* Practice mindfulness while at home. Like in the studio, shut down all electronics and noise.

* Give yourself a time limit. I notice that I try to cut my practice short if I don’t dedicate exactly 45 minutes to yoga.  There is always time for laundry, but very little time for yourself.

* Quiet the voices in your head. In a studio it is a lot easier not to have to think of what you will be making for dinner, cleaning, or working on next; at home it is harder to stay focused.

Tips for practicing yoga as a runner, or, Why I practice yoga as a runner:

* Stretching is good. It improves flexibility and strengthens your core, which allows you to run longer with less pain. Pain relief while running is the key to keep running – that and giving yourself a goal. In 2014 I am running you over … L.A. Marathon, here I come. (My friend is doing the L.A. Marathon, not me. I wish!)

 

I love her tips. Now, here are a few notes from me.

 

What works best for me, in my yoga practice and in life, is when I am able to connect the two – allowing the emphasis on breathing, mindfulness and meditation to flow between my practice and my life and finding ways to have my practice keep me focused on mindfulness when life gets busy or challenging. When I let my practice slide, I notice it in other areas of my life.

 

This article is a good reminder to me to unplug and roll out the yoga mat, which I think I’ll go do right now.

How do you create time and space for yourself in your life? Have you tried yoga? Do you notice the benefits of it in your life? Have you ever tried it with your children? I’d love to learn of your journey, so pop over to The Good Long Road on Facebook and share.

 

Jennifer Fischer is co-founder of the SCV Film Festival, a mom of two, an independent filmmaker and owner of Think Ten Media Group, whose Generation Arts division offers programs for SCV youth. She writes about her parenting journey on her blog, The Good Long Road. Her commentary is published Saturdays on SCVNews.com.

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