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Inclusive teaching and learning
Many learners struggle to engage with formal education. This can be for a range of reasons and there's no simple answer to any of them. This site is about reducing the barriers to engagement wherever possible. It will often focus on technology but that's only because technology has a lot to offer in many contexts. Other 'human based' approaches can be just as effective so they'll also get space when they cross the horizon.
Curated by alistairm
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Internet Archive Book Images

Internet Archive Book Images | Inclusive teaching and learning | Scoop.it
The Internet Archive, a 501(c)(3) non-profit, is building a digital library of Internet sites and other cultural artifacts in digital form. Like a paper library, we provide free access to...

Via John Dalziel
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John Dalziel's curator insight, August 30, 2014 3:36 AM

Internet Archive is a new collection at Flickr where practitioners, and learners, can search through an archive of 2.6 million public domain images, all extracted from books, magazines and newspapers published over a 500 year period.
This new Flickr archive accomplishes something quite important, it concentrates on images.
How do you search through the archive? (It’s not entirely obvious)
From the home page of the archive, users can do a keyword search. As they’re filling in the keyword, Flickr will produce a dropdown which includes the words “Internet Archive Book Images’ Photostream.”
Users must make sure they click on those words, or else their search results will include images from other parts of Flickr.
NOTE: All images can be downloaded for free. They’re all public domain.

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NounProject

The Noun Project collects, organizes and adds to the highly recognizable symbols that form the world's visual language, so we may share them in a fun and meaningful way.


The aim is to produce a simple graphic for every noun in the English language.

 

Images are posted as high-quality vector files that can be imported, resized, and modified by any photo editing software.

 

The images are in the public domain or shared with Creative Commons licenses. 

 

The possible uses for these images, by educators, are endless: bulletin boards, signs, learner projects/asignments, labels are a few ideas that come to mind withpout much effort.


Via John Dalziel
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