Inclusive Busines...
Follow
Find
16.2K views | +11 today
Inclusive Business and Impact Investing
The first and highest rated scoop.it blog on sustainable and inclusive business models that do well by doing good in emerging markets. The curations are mine.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

The Private Equity/ Sustainability Connection

The Private Equity/ Sustainability Connection | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

Private equity often gets a bad rap these days. But David M. Rubenstein, a co-founder and managing director of Carlyle Group, argues that private equity can help companies become more sustainable and socially responsible. And that, in turn, can help companies make even more money.

 

The private-equity giant recently teamed up with the Environmental Defense Fund and a consultant, Payne Firm, to incorporate environmental considerations in its due-diligence process. It's part of the firm's efforts to consider environmental, social and corporate-governance (ESG) principles in the way it invests.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Bringing Medicines to Low-income Markets | Center for Health Market Innovations (CHMI)

Prescription medication – it’s all relatively simple, isn’t it? Pharmaceutical companies carry out research and development, produce, and deliver medicines through established distribution channels. We go to a health care professional if something isn’t right with our health or for regular check-ups, are diagnosed, go to our local pharmacy to fill our prescriptions (paying only a copay of course, as health insurance pays the rest), and pick them up soon after. Our medicines are of high quality, make us better, and are generally accepted in society as a good thing.

That’s not how it works for the estimated 4 billion people at the bottom of the economic pyramid who live in the urban slums and rural villages of developing and emerging countries. Approximately 1.7 billion of them lack access to essential medicines, even though 95% of those drugs are no longer patented. The time and expense involved in visiting a doctor often leads these patients to self-diagnose, and pharmaceuticals are frequently out of stock, carry high mark-ups, or are counterfeit.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

A Responsibility and a Market: Why Danone May Represent the Future of BoP Business - Business Fights Poverty

A Responsibility and a Market: Why Danone May Represent the Future of BoP Business - Business Fights Poverty | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

The “future of BOP business” is a sweeping, flashy claim. Yet Danone’s strategy appears to be different for all the right, non-flashy reasons.

A strict focus on unit economics, clear understanding of the business’ role in social impact, and most of all, direct links between base of the pyramid (BOP) market growth and core business goals set their approach apart.

Eric Soubeiran leads the company’s BOP business efforts as head of Danone’s newly launched BOP Business Unit based in Gurgaon, India. In our recent conversation, Soubeiran described in detail Danone’s trajectory related to BOP markets beginning with the launch of Fundooz, a yogurt product for kids in India. The two variations of Fundooz – Yum Creamy and Yum Chuski – are priced at Rs 10 and Rs 5 respectively.

Soubeiran has not yet proven that Danone’s model for providing nutritious food to C&D consumer segments can be replicated at scale. But our interview showed plenty of reasons – and good old fashioned business sense – to back up expectations that they will.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

The new growth frontier: Midsize cities in emerging markets - McKinsey Quarterly

The new growth frontier: Midsize cities in emerging markets - McKinsey Quarterly | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

Senior executives searching for growth face a stark new reality: roughly 400 midsize cities in emerging markets—cities they mostly will have never heard of—are posed to generate nearly 40 percent of global growth over the next 15 years. That’s more growth than the combined total of all developed economies plus the emerging markets’ megacities (those with populations of more than ten million, such as Mumbai, São Paulo, and Shanghai), which together have been the historic focus of most multinationals. Learning about consumer attitudes in the emerging markets’ “middleweight” cities (three-quarters of which have less than two million people), figuring out market entry strategies for them, and deciding how to allocate resources within and across them will all be crucial priorities in the years ahead.

 

New research from the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI) seeks to arm executives with the knowledge they’ll need to tap into global urban growth. (For assumptions underlying the data in this narrated slideshow, see sidebar, “Urban world uncertainties and assumptions.”) Midsize cities in emerging markets are poised not only to generate much of the world’s growth in the years ahead but also to become dramatically richer. By 2025, for instance, more of the world’s middle-class households will be in emerging rather than in developed markets. Companies selling products for middle-class children and retirees alike will find many of their biggest markets in emerging economies. The same will be true for infrastructure and basic-material companies that are helping to create these rapidly growing cities. It all adds up to a brave new world for the multinationals targeting them—and a better one for their inhabitants.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

USAID Prioritizes to Boost Impact in Africa

USAID Prioritizes to Boost Impact in Africa | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

In an era of tight budgets, U.S. foreign assistance programs aim to maximize the impact of limited funds. The U.S. Agency for International Development is curtailing initiatives in Latin America and Eastern Europe to boost efforts elsewhere, including Africa, where American-funded projects are spurring food production and improving healthcare.

Villagers near Senegal’s River Delta plan a year-long rotation of crops to supplement their diets and incomes. USAID provides technical guidance and has constructed wells for irrigation, helping to turn fertile soil into flourishing gardens. Ngara Diatta tends an onion patch that will later produce tomatoes, eggplants, and cabbage.

"Before, goats and cows would trample our garden and eat the vegetables," said the gardener. "It was upsetting to work so hard and have it all ruined. Now thanks to this project, we have fences to protect our crops and I can sleep peacefully. This project has changed our lives. We can sell these vegetables to help our families."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Expert report sets out new agricultural resilience strategy for African countries

Expert report sets out new agricultural resilience strategy for African countries | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

World leaders must recognise that agricultural growth in Africa is still too fragile and needs to become more resilient if the continent is to work towards improving the livelihoods of millions, according to a new report (pdf).

In the report, published on Wednesday, the Montpellier Panel – consisting of leading experts in the fields of agriculture, trade and sustainable development – has set out a strategy for resilient African agriculture before the forthcoming Rio+20, G8 and G20 summits.

The panel argues that agricultural growth per se is not enough if countries are then unable to face, withstand and bounce back from the enormous and continual challenges facing African farmers, including continuing fluctuations in food prices, pest and plant disease epidemics, and climate change.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Harley-Davidson Embraces Sustainability, but Will It's Customers?

Harley-Davidson Embraces Sustainability, but Will It's Customers? | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

At the Green Energy Summit that took place earlier this month in its home city of Milwaukee, Harley-Davidson President Matt Levatich publicly touted the company’s sustainable business initiatives, calling them a core part of its business strategy. Although Harley-Davidson released Sustainability Strategy Reports in 2009 and 2010, and has been tracking greenhouse gas emissions since 2004, sustainability has not typically been a strategic focus for the company.

However, attention to sustainability has been ramping up at Harley over the last 18 months and some progress has been made. The creation of a sustainability subcommittee within the board of directors is partially responsible for this new strategic focus. According to the 2010 report, the company cut carbon emissions from its manufacturing operations by 42 percent from 79,232 metric tons in 2004 to 46,184 metric tons in 2010. Harley is also evaluating several different waste reduction projects and efficiency investments in its York, Pennsylvania factory. ”We’re planting a lot of seeds. None of them are heroic by themselves,” Levatich said. “Collectively, we think it’s going to make a big difference.”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Learning from the ‘Next 4 Billion’ Markets | CSR International

Learning from the ‘Next 4 Billion’ Markets | CSR International | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

A new PwC study outlines the emerging class of citizens and consumers defining a critical growth horizon for companies over the coming decade. The report focuses on strategies adopted by leaders who have tried to grow profitably in this global emerging market.

Globally, businesses are looking at the “Next 4 Billion” for growth, especially now, given the slowdown in mature economics.
Businesses functioning in this group (which includes India, China, Indonesia parts of Africa and Latin America where over 4 billion of the world’s 7 billion reside) have traditionally focused on the middle and upper middle income tiers.
That the next big wave of business opportunity will come from the Global Emerging Middle (GEM), which lies just below the middle income segment and above the low income segment.
GEM will represent a combined annual market, globally, in excess of USD 6 trillion by 2021.
In India alone, this market is expected to cross the USD 1 trillion threshold by 2021.
For companies seeking to succeed in this challenging environment, their strategy should consider three important vectors.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Entrepreneurs will be first movers in impact investing - Corporate News - livemint.com

Entrepreneurs will be first movers in impact investing - Corporate News - livemint.com | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

Mumbai: Silicon Valley entrepreneur-turned-impact-investor Charly Kleissner talks about impact investing, and the role it can play in effective philanthropy in India. Edited excerpts:

What is impact investing?

Impact investors care about one thing and one thing only at the top level: that their investments have a proven and measurable positive environmental and/or social impact. So what that means is that when you do the due diligence, if the potential investment cannot demonstrate positive impact, it would not be an impact investment, and if it does not commit to measuring impact on an ongoing basis, then it would not be an impact investment.

Why should Indian philanthropists adopt impact investing?

If you represent wealth, or a wealthy family or a wealthy foundation, and you care about impact, would you not ask the question of how to maximize it? And why not use all the tools available to you, including your capital, to align with the impact that you want to make? I, for one, do not understand how people who have values, would knowingly and consciously work against their values with their wealth. That does not make sense—the holistic nature of the issues that we have to deal with demand a more holistic approach.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

6 Companies That Are Growing Rapidly While Doing Good

6 Companies That Are Growing Rapidly While Doing Good | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

For many companies, it’s the holy grail: grow revenue, increase jobs, and be socially responsible at the same time. Sometimes, social responsibility is sacrificed in the name of keeping companies afloat. But these six companies, dubbed Rockstars of the New Economy by B Lab, have achieved three to 100 times revenue or job growth while maintaining a high environmental and social impact. That’s success.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Valuing nature, changing economics

Valuing nature, changing economics | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

The concept of natural capital accounting - valuing natural resources as accurately as possible, and including in national accounts the costs and benefits of conserving vs destroying them - has emerged as a major theme in international environmental circles in recent years.

It's the central idea of The Economics of Ecosytems and Biodiversity (Teeb) project, which, among other things, calculated a few years back that degradation of the world's forests is costing the global economy $2-5 trillion each year, with the brunt falling on the poor who live closest to tropical forests.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Can Goldman Sachs and Wall Street Compete on Improving Society, Not Just Wealth Accumulation?

Can Goldman Sachs and Wall Street Compete on Improving Society, Not Just Wealth Accumulation? | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

How do you pick a winner? Bet on both sides.

CEOs and companies donate generously to both political parties; more than 70 percent of the S&P 500 practice this approach. Traders of options craft strategies like "straddles" to cover both sides. And savvy investors like Goldman Sachs play both sides too: John Paulson's mortgage-market bets minted him a billionaire in the 2008 meltdown. But Goldman profited by both co-investing in this strategy while also selling the exact opposite trade to its clients. Playing both sides, for which Goldman is rightly assailed, results in conflicts of interest, and erosion of client trust.

This week's New York Times guest editorial by Greg Smith, formerly of Goldman Sachs' equity derivatives unit, continues to chip away at Goldman's formerly stellar brand and reputation, cracking the foundation built more than Marcus Goldman and Samuel Sachs back more than 140 years ago. This is not a surprise to most of us, but continues to reinforce how the culture of "money at any cost" is deeply embedded on Wall Street. Greg Smith's piercing quote sums it up: "People who care only about making money will not sustain this firm -- or the trust of its clients -- for very much longer."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

VIVAnews - Indonesia Has More of ASEAN's Top Companies

VIVAnews - Indonesia Has More of ASEAN's Top Companies | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

VIVAnews – A consulting firm, Boston Consulting Group (BCG), figures 50 companies in Southeast Asia will emerge as the new market leaders in the region. Indonesian and Malaysian companies are the major contributors with a total of 12 corporations.
In The Companies Piloting a Soaring Region report obtained by VIVAnews, BCG announced that the 50 companies were selected from an analysis of geographic and economic diversity.
BCG at least listed around 500 companies in Southeast Asia of which annual income reach at least US$500 million per year.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

BASF SE : Launch of Bangladesh’s First Long Lasting Impregnated Net (LLIN) Plant | 4-Traders

BASF SE : Launch of Bangladesh’s First Long Lasting Impregnated Net (LLIN) Plant | 4-Traders | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

Dhaka, Bangladesh - March 23, 2012 - BASF Grameen Limited, a social business joint venture between BASF, the world's leading chemical company, and Grameen Healthcare Trust of Bangladesh, can now source from a local production plant located in Social Business Industrial Park in Sarabo, the plant owned and operated by Grameen Fabrics & Fashions Limited, will manufacture long lasting insecticide impregnated nets under the brand name Interceptor® that can prevent malaria infections effectively. These nets will be marketed by BASF Grameen Limited.

The plant was inaugurated at the hands of Nobel Laureate, Professor Muhammad Yunus and Mrs. Saori Dubourg, President Asia Pacific, BASF, at a public function held at the plant premises.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

How Pepsi Made Water Its Sustainability Cause

How Pepsi Made Water Its Sustainability Cause | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

The ever-increasing focus on sustainability by brands is like a rock thrown into a lake, with the effects continuing to ripple outward. Suddenly, it isn’t all about limiting interaction to times revolving around consumption. Companies are thinking about how the consumer can do more, positively impacting the environment during use or at disposal. And they’re also going further and further up the supply chain to ensure virtuous behavior--knowing that journalists are growing more vocal about environmental infractions that previously remained hidden.

Speaking with Robert ter Kuile, PepsiCo’s senior director of environmental sustainability, I learned that this ripple is now spreading beyond the consumer entirely, and into their communities at large. Ter Kuile, who spoke about innovation in water use at GLOBE 2012, said that his company is digging deep into local communities to find water-saving opportunities that produce both positive environmental and consumer impact.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

A Dragon Becomes Canada’s Newest Impact Investor | Blog | Social Finance

A Dragon Becomes Canada’s Newest Impact Investor | Blog | Social Finance | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

Arlene Dickinson, a leading Canadian investor and entrepreneur, CEO and owner of Venture Communications, and one of the “Dragons” on CBC’s Dragons' Den invested $450,000 in La Siembra, an Ottawa-based worker co-operative that owns Camino, a Canadian brand of fair trade, organic food products including chocolate and coffee.

It was a Big Decision. Arlene is clearly a discerning investor, and she was looking for a good investment that met her financial expectations. But she was clearly looking at the triple bottom line, too.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

The Rockefeller Foundation and IFTF Join Forces to Combat Poverty | Caelus Green Room

The Rockefeller Foundation and IFTF Join Forces to Combat Poverty | Caelus Green Room | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

PALO ALTO, Calif., March 21, 2012 / 3BL Media / PRNewswire/ – On April 3, the Rockefeller Foundation and the Institute for the Future (IFTF) will join forces with people across the globe and ask them to help solve global poverty through an interactive online game. The game, dubbed Catalysts for Change, is based on the premise that collaboration on a global scale can yield unique insights into ways to create a more prosperous, equitable future. These insights will trigger innovations that will make a significant difference in the lives of poor or vulnerable communities. The game can be played online at game.catalyze4change.org.

Around the world, hundreds of millions of people are looking for ways out of poverty. While progress has been made, over 1.2 billion poor or vulnerable people around the world are still living in extreme poverty.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Scientists call for fundamental governance overhaul to ensure Earth's sustainability

Scientists call for fundamental governance overhaul to ensure Earth's sustainability | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

Research now indicates that the world is nearing critical tipping points in the Earth system, including on climate and biodiversity, which if not addressed through a new framework of governance could lead to rapid and irreversible change.
"Science assessments indicate that human activities are moving several of Earth's sub-systems outside the range of natural variability typical for the previous 500,000 years," wrote the authors in the opening of "Navigating the Anthropocene: Improving Earth System Governance."
Reducing the risk of potential global environmental disaster requires the development of "a clear and ambitious roadmap for institutional change and effective sustainability governance within the next decade," comparable in scale and importance to the reform of international governance that followed World War II, they wrote.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

U.S. Intelligence Says Water Shortages Threaten Stability

Competition for increasingly scarce water in the next decade will fuel instability in regions such as South Asia and the Middle East that are important to U.S. national security, according to a U.S. intelligence report.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Ancient civilizations reveal ways to manage fisheries for sustainability

Ancient civilizations reveal ways to manage fisheries for sustainability | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

In a study published on March 23 in the journal Fish and Fisheries, a team of marine scientists reconstructed fisheries yields over seven centuries of human habitation in Hawaii and the Florida Keys, the largest coral reef ecosystems in the United States, and evaluated the management strategies associated with periods of sustainability. The results surprised them.
"Before European contact, Native Hawaiians were catching fish at rates that far exceed what reefs currently provide society," said John "Jack" N. Kittinger, co-author and an early career fellow at the Center for Ocean Solutions at Stanford University. "These results show us that fisheries can be both highly productive and sustainable, if they're managed effectively." In contrast, historical fisheries in Florida were characterized by boom and bust, with serial depletions of highly valuable species for export markets. Today many species that were the target of 19th and early 20th century fisheries in Florida - including green turtles, sawfish, conch and groupers - have severely reduced populations or are in danger of extinction.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Matthew Bishop | India has a lot of potential for market-based solutions to poverty - Corporate News - livemint.com

Matthew Bishop | India has a lot of potential for market-based solutions to poverty - Corporate News - livemint.com | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

Mumbai: In the second of our three-part series covering the Indian Philanthropy Forum, Matthew Bishop, New York editor-in-chief of The Economist, and co-author of the book Philanthrocapitalism: How Giving Can Save the World, talks about philanthrocapitalism in the Indian context.

In your book, you describe philanthrocapitalism as giving in a way “which mirrors the way business is done in the for-profit capitalist world”. How do you see this playing out in India?

There is a tradition of philanthropy here, but it is very much old-style philanthropy. And I think there is this group of entrepreneurs that is starting to be shaped by what they see in America in particular, and by Bill Gates and Warren Buffett, and by the capitalism model. And I think where India has quite a lot of potential is the market-based solutions to poverty, where the philanthropist comes in and provides the capital to do a lot of experimentation around trying out models of delivering services such as education, clean water or healthcare. So if they can crack the business model, the for-profit market can then scale it up.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

B Lab Announces 53 GIIRS Pioneer Funds and 17 GIIRS Pioneer Investors – Press Releases on CSRwire.com

B Lab Announces 53 GIIRS Pioneer Funds and 17 GIIRS Pioneer Investors – Press Releases on CSRwire.com | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

BERWYN, Penn., Mar. 21 /CSRwire/ - B Lab is pleased to announce the final group of GIIRS Pioneer Funds. Eleven new funds have joined the Pioneer Funds since October, bringing the total number of funds to 53. These new funds represent $366 million in invested capital, with a combined total assets under management for the 53 Pioneer Funds of $1.9 billion and investments in over 30 countries around the globe. The commitment by these investment practitioners to transparently measure impact using GIIRS is the driving force that makes the impact investing industry real. Please join us in celebrating their leadership.

The new GIIRS Pioneer Funds represent a diverse range of investment vehicles that address the financing needs of entrepreneurs globally, ranging from early-stage equity to long-term debt funding. Joining the GIIRS Pioneer Fund community in this final group are: Agri-Vie’s Agri-Vie I Fund, Pearl Capital’s AAC II Fund, Business Partners International (BPI) Rwanda SME Fund, Developing World Markets' (DWM) new private equity fund, Claro y Asociados’ Fondo de Inversión Social (FIS) Fund, Pacific Community Ventures’ PCV Growth Fund II, AlphaMundi’s Prometheus BoP Energy Access Fund, SEAF’s Permanent Capital Vehicle (PCV) Fund, RISKebiz’s Fund I, TBC Capital’s TBCCIIF-I Fund, and Conservation International’s Verde Ventures Fund.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Interview: Paul Herman, the HIP Investor | Blog | Social Finance

Interview: Paul Herman, the HIP Investor | Blog | Social Finance | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing investment adviser and portfolio manager R. Paul Herman, pioneer of the HIP (Human Impact + Profit) methodology and author of The HIP Investor: Make Bigger Profits by Building a Better World. Paul invented HIP in 2004 to connect investors seeking positive human, social and environmental impacts and seeking financial returns with investments designed to deliver those intended results. Paul shared his insights and thoughts on constructing an impact investing portfolio as well as his most practical solution for investors to start thinking about this process.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Giving for profit

Giving for profit | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

There is a growing view among corporate philanthropists that there is more to making a difference in the community than hosting benefit nights and signing big cheques.

Instead, they believe they are more likely to achieve lasting change by applying their business acumen to the challenge of overcoming entrenched disadvantage.

Recruitment industry pioneer Geoff Morgan has a long-standing commitment to stamping out the discrimination and inequalities that keep the disadvantaged out of work or under-utilised, especially in the indigenous community, “because, sadly, the most disadvantaged are indigenous Australians”, he says.

Morgan and business partner Andrew Banks co-founded recruitment powerhouse Morgan & Banks in the 1980s and in 2003 they teamed up again to start listed recruitment and human resources group Talent2. Morgan is a director – Banks is chairman – and he believes the best contribution he can make to getting more indigenous people in jobs, and in better jobs, is to do what he does best: be a recruitment entrepreneur.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Inclusive Business: Opportunities for BoP, Stocknova

The inclusive business model effectively builds bridges between businesses and the low income population (also known as the Base of the Pyramid, or BoP) for mutual benefit in the supply chain, in the workplace and in the marketplace.

The Inclusive Business approach is about sustainability, inclusiveness and innovation, which makes it a unique approach compared to traditional business models. Inclusive business models are often highly creative solutions that buy from, or sell to, substantial numbers of low income people, generating a mutually beneficial outcome. Innovation is often achieved through engagement with non-traditional business partners such as producer associations or non-profits, enabling companies and other stakeholders to pool financial investment, skills, contacts and other resources.

It is estimated that by the end of 2011 the world population reached 7 billion, of which 55 per cent are currently part of the global BoP, with incomes of less than US$8 per day (that is, without a sustained income source, and with scarce opportunities for entering the goods, services or employment markets).

more...
No comment yet.