Social Finance Matters (investing and business models for good)
27.3K views | +2 today
Follow
Social Finance Matters (investing and business models for good)
The first and highest rated scoop.it blog on social finance and sustainable and inclusive business. The curations are mine.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Are we better off than we think?

"Despite global inequalities, most of the world is better off than you think - and better off than it has ever been before.  Watch Hans Rosling explain why."


Tags: media, models, gapminder, development, perspective.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient

Inequality and the Gini Coefficient | Social Finance Matters (investing and business models for good) | Scoop.it
Think everyone should just pull themselves up by their bootstraps? Try this one on for size.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, October 12, 2013 3:00 PM

Educating in poverty

Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:47 AM

Do you find this information surprising?

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, April 5, 8:20 AM

This video shows the place matters; a Washington D.C. educator shows how food deserts and other spatial problems of poverty impact his students on a daily basis.  We usually look at life expectancy data at the national scale and that obscures some of the real issues of poverty in developed countries.  Above is a map that shows the Gini index which measures the degree of economic inequality (the Gini coefficient was recently added to the APHG course content for the Industrialization and Economic Development unit).  Here are some maps and data from the World Bank that utilizes the Gini Index as well as an interactive Gapminder graph.  


Tags: industry, location, place, migration, APHG, poverty, socioeconomic.

Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Extreme Poverty Drops Worldwide

Extreme Poverty Drops Worldwide | Social Finance Matters (investing and business models for good) | Scoop.it
The world has achieved its first Millennium Development Goal of cutting extreme poverty in half ahead of the 2015 deadline, a study by the World Bank shows.

 

The bank defines extreme poverty as living on under $1.25 per day, adjusted for purchasing power parity. According to the report, released this week, 1.29 billion people, or 22 percent of the developing world’s population, live below $1.25 a day, down from 52 percent in 1981.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Map the Meal Gap: Food Insecurity in your county

Map the Meal Gap: Food Insecurity in your county | Social Finance Matters (investing and business models for good) | Scoop.it
Visit Feeding America, the nation's leading domestic hunger-relief charity. Feeding America's helps provide food to over 37 millions Americans each year.

 

Food insecurity is an important issue in human geography that, like so many things, impacts people is different ways depending on where they live.  This interactive map is a great tool for student projects, and local comparisons.  This is also a great tool to build geographic empathy and (for American students) to see that issues of dire poverty aren't only in the developing world. 


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 7, 2013 9:53 PM

Food insecurity is an important issue in human geography that, like so many things, impacts people is different ways depending on where they live.  This interactive map is a great tool for student projects, and local comparisons.  This is also a great tool to build geographic empathy and (for American students) to see that issues of dire poverty aren't only in the developing world.

Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

U.S. AID education/poverty infographic

U.S. AID education/poverty infographic | Social Finance Matters (investing and business models for good) | Scoop.it

An excellent infographic that highlights the importance of education in the process of fighting poverty.  Why is education (especially women) so pivotal for development?  Should this change how we think about humanitarian aid?       


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, January 27, 2014 8:37 AM

From this article i get to know that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually suceed through hard work and support from their family.

Zemus Koh's curator insight, January 27, 2014 10:11 AM

From this infographic, I can see the importance of education and how it can impact us in our lives. Education is key as it can help us in many ways such as being able to teach our offspings survival skills and also help us to earn more so that we can bring up a family and support them. However important education is, it still comes with a price. As such, many are deprived of this oppurtunity to be educated even though education is somewhat considered a neccessity. Other benefits of education to women include a lesser chance of contracting STDs and also having a higher chance to immunize their children compared to non-educated women. Since education is a key to survival and an important part in our lives, why is it that no effort is made to promote this or to fund more projects that help the less fortunate to get a chance to be educated?

Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, February 23, 2014 7:28 AM

This article tells me that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually succeed through hard work and support from their family. It stated that most children who drop out from school are girls and most of the people cant read live in developing countries. In this century i am sure that proper education are given to those who could not afford it as everyone want to succeed. I think that it does not matter if a child's mother is without an education as they can succeed if they work hard and opportunity is given to them.

Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Yardstick of Wealth

"In the last of a series of programmes exploring global population for the award-winning This World strand, Rosling presents an 'as live' studio event featuring cutting-edge 3D infographics painting a vivid picture of a world that has changed in ways we barely understand – often for the better."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Kibet Koskei's curator insight, November 2, 2013 4:19 AM

ATTENTION !
Get Paid To Enlighten African Youth On How To Use The Internet To Grow Rich ! Re: Ref:Jobs Are Moving Online, Lets Us Help You Acquire The Skills Of 21st Century and Help You To Be A head Of the Masses in Getting Online Jobs!
http://www.firstandfastcapital.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=690&Itemid=623

Sue Bicknell's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:37 AM

Another fantastic presentation by Rosling

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:27 AM

Rosling does a great job speaking of poverty and population. This would be an awesome text to use in a unit about poverty. This can be incorporated in a history class, economics class, sociology class, even an anthropology class if it is offered in highschools. 

It is a perfect length video that can be used to introduce a writing assignment, a research project, or an in class group assignment. But it also shows the extremety of poor vs. rich. From what I have seen students like to state their opinions about issues like this. Teachers may have to watch out how they introduce this into their topic or discussion, but it is a worthwhile source to use. 

Scooped by W. Robert de Jongh
Scoop.it!

Living through Crises: How the food, fuel and financial shocks affect the poor

What did the global food, fuel, and financial crises of 2008-11 mean to people living in the developing world? How did people cope with the crisis and how effective were they at averting major impacts?

 

On Wednesday, I spoke at the launch of a new book, Living Through Crises: How the Food, Fuel and Financial Shocks Affect the Poor, by Rasmus Heltberg, Naomi Hossain and Anna Reva. It’s a joint World Bank and IDS publication, also available for free online. I think it could prove quite influential. (source: http://www.oxfamblogs.org/fp2p/?p=9711)

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Brazil's disappearing favelas

Brazil's disappearing favelas | Social Finance Matters (investing and business models for good) | Scoop.it

Infrastructure demanded by the sporting world's most powerful corporate interests render families homeless in Brazil.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Erica Tommarello's curator insight, October 2, 2013 12:52 PM

FIFA 2014 is being hosted in Brazil. This article details the completely flawed and inhumane plan that Brazil has to get ready for the madness of FIFA. They seem to be too caught up in artificial aesthetic and have lost focus on development, while displacing thousands of poor Brazilians on the way.

Investors Europe Stock Brokers's curator insight, July 15, 2014 3:21 AM

Welcome to Investors Europe Mauritius Stock Brokers
http://www.investorseurope.net/offshoretraderdemo.html
http://www.investorseurope.net/en/managing-director ;
http://www.investorseurope.net/en/nominee-accounts

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, October 20, 2014 12:04 PM

With the world cup and summer Olympics being hosted in Brazil, the government are forcing people out of favelas to improve their image for tourists. What is frustrating about this is that bringing in a large sporting event like the Olympics and world cup actually looses money for the hosting country. So in their haste they are damaging the country twice over. First the government of Brazil is creating thousands of displaced and poor citizens, and on top of that they are spending valuable resources on preparing for a sporting event that will not turn a profit. What will happen after 2016, when you have a massive population of desperate homeless people migrating back to the favelas.

Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from News, reflections and innovation in Development Aid
Scoop.it!

What’s going on with global inequality? Let’s ask Andy Sumner

What’s going on with global inequality? Let’s ask Andy Sumner | Social Finance Matters (investing and business models for good) | Scoop.it

Via Rafael Monterde Díaz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Agriculture and Rural Development Day UN Climate Talks

Agriculture and Rural Development Day UN Climate Talks | Social Finance Matters (investing and business models for good) | Scoop.it
Farmers are at the forefront of dealing with climate change around the world. How are they coping, and what opportunities do the shifts present?

 

An excellent set resources discussing the plight of farmers various regional and ecological situations.  From the famers in Mozambique impacted by unreliable rainfall to Guyana farmers at risk from rising sea fells, climate change is impacting the most vulnerable (and the least responsible) the hardest.  


Via Seth Dixon
more...
No comment yet.