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Inclusive Business and Impact Investing
The first and highest rated scoop.it blog on sustainable and inclusive business models that do well by doing good in emerging markets.
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Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
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The Economics of Sustainability

http://www.ted.com Have we used up all our resources? Have we filled up all the livable space on Earth? Paul Gilding suggests we have, and the possibility of...

 

This provocatively title TED talk would be an excellent resource for discussing sustainable development.  What are the economic, environmental, political and cultural ramifications of suggested policies that seek to lead towards sustainable development?  What are the ramifications of not changing policies towards sustainable development?  


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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, December 12, 2013 1:02 AM

 I found this video very interesting because it spoke about how there is so little space and more and more people are having kids. But there is no space because everyone likes having a lot of room to expand that is why because everyone in the world could fit in the state of California. So there is space it is just not spread out good enough that everyone could fit comfortably. 

Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
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Brazilian Ethanol

Brazilian Ethanol | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

"Distilling ethanol from tropical sugarcane takes less land and uses less fossil fuel than starting with corn grown in temperate climes. That makes Brazilian ethanol, unlike the pampered and grotesquely wasteful American version, competitive with hydrocarbons and genuinely good for the environment." 

 

Although ethanol is working well for Brazil, there is a growing literature supporting the idea that wide-scale ethanol production is not sustainable or environmentally beneficial.  This is a great example to demonstrate that economic and environmental policies are locally dependent on geographic factors and are not universally transferable.  For a simple explanation of the differences in the economic and environmental differences in the production of sugar and corn-based ethanol, see: http://cei.org/studies-issue-analysis/brazilian-sugarcane-ethanol-experience  


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Al Picozzi's curator insight, October 1, 2013 1:28 PM

Great idea here.  i know that using corn is much more expensive than sugar, nut imagine the tade we can get with Brazil if we imprt more sugan ans then use it for gas.  It will probably still be cheaper than the regular gas, and the corn ethanol.  In the long run if this is used, along with the shale oil depositis the US has, we can reduce our dependance on oil from areas like the middle east and other countries which in turn can create many jobs here in the US.

Ryan Amado's curator insight, December 11, 2013 1:27 AM

Here we have just one example of how technological advances have helped solve some of our world's energy problems.  Ethanol is slowly becoming a popular commodity.  However, until ethanol can be used in every single vehicle, it will not overtake traditional gasoline, and gas prices will continue to be high.  Because these hybrid vehciles are becoming more and more popular, less gas is being bought, and us non-hybrid users are paying the price for it.  This is a good step in the right direction, but the process needs to move faster if we are truely going to all benefit from the use of these alternative fuels.  

Jess Deady's curator insight, April 24, 5:03 PM

Difference in economical and ecological factors have everything to do with what Brazil is doing with ethanol. Since ethanol in Brazil is simpler and easier to obtain, American ethanol is highly useless and apparently not worth the money.