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Inclusive Business and Impact Investing
The first and highest rated scoop.it blog on sustainable and inclusive business models that do well by doing good in emerging markets. The curations are mine.
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Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
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Yardstick of Wealth

"In the last of a series of programmes exploring global population for the award-winning This World strand, Rosling presents an 'as live' studio event featuring cutting-edge 3D infographics painting a vivid picture of a world that has changed in ways we barely understand – often for the better."


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Kibet Koskei's curator insight, November 2, 2013 4:19 AM

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Sue Bicknell's curator insight, November 4, 2013 7:37 AM

Another fantastic presentation by Rosling

Rola Fahs's curator insight, November 13, 2013 10:27 AM

Rosling does a great job speaking of poverty and population. This would be an awesome text to use in a unit about poverty. This can be incorporated in a history class, economics class, sociology class, even an anthropology class if it is offered in highschools. 

It is a perfect length video that can be used to introduce a writing assignment, a research project, or an in class group assignment. But it also shows the extremety of poor vs. rich. From what I have seen students like to state their opinions about issues like this. Teachers may have to watch out how they introduce this into their topic or discussion, but it is a worthwhile source to use. 

Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
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World Bank eAtlas of Global Development

"The World Bank eAtlas of Global Development maps and graphs more than 175 thematically organized indicators for over 200 countries, letting you visualize and compare progress on the most important development challenges facing our world. Most indicators cover several decades, so you can see, for example, how 'life expectancy at birth' has improved from 1960 up through the latest year."  This tool should greatly enhance student projects as they will add more data, and see bigger patterns.  To go to the link visit: http://www.app.collinsindicate.com/worldbankatlas-global/en


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Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5?

Rethinking the Demographic Transition Model: Stage 5? | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

Eighty-two years after the original development of the four stage Demographic Transition Model (DTM) by the late demographer Warren Thompson (1887-1973), the cracks are starting to show on the model that for many years revolutionized how we think about the geography of our global population. 


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Sally Egan's curator insight, September 8, 2013 7:41 AM

Well explained this is an update on the Demographic Transition Model, taking into account the prospect of negative population growth.

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U.S. AID education/poverty infographic

U.S. AID education/poverty infographic | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

An excellent infographic that highlights the importance of education in the process of fighting poverty.  Why is education (especially women) so pivotal for development?  Should this change how we think about humanitarian aid?       


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Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, January 27, 8:37 AM

From this article i get to know that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually suceed through hard work and support from their family.

Zemus Koh's curator insight, January 27, 10:11 AM

From this infographic, I can see the importance of education and how it can impact us in our lives. Education is key as it can help us in many ways such as being able to teach our offspings survival skills and also help us to earn more so that we can bring up a family and support them. However important education is, it still comes with a price. As such, many are deprived of this oppurtunity to be educated even though education is somewhat considered a neccessity. Other benefits of education to women include a lesser chance of contracting STDs and also having a higher chance to immunize their children compared to non-educated women. Since education is a key to survival and an important part in our lives, why is it that no effort is made to promote this or to fund more projects that help the less fortunate to get a chance to be educated?

Fiqah Nasrin's curator insight, February 23, 7:28 AM

This article tells me that a child who born to an educated mother will benefit more than a child who born to mothers without an education. Quite a number of women in the world are without a proper education. Is it fair to women without a proper education to be condemn to be told that their child will do poorly rather than a child of an educated mothers. Their child would eventually succeed through hard work and support from their family. It stated that most children who drop out from school are girls and most of the people cant read live in developing countries. In this century i am sure that proper education are given to those who could not afford it as everyone want to succeed. I think that it does not matter if a child's mother is without an education as they can succeed if they work hard and opportunity is given to them.

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How Economic Inequality Harms Societies

"http://www.ted.com We feel instinctively that societies with huge income gaps are somehow going wrong. Richard Wilkinson charts the hard data on economic inequality, and shows what gets worse when rich and poor are too far apart..."


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Agriculture and Rural Development Day UN Climate Talks

Agriculture and Rural Development Day UN Climate Talks | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it
Farmers are at the forefront of dealing with climate change around the world. How are they coping, and what opportunities do the shifts present?

 

An excellent set resources discussing the plight of farmers various regional and ecological situations.  From the famers in Mozambique impacted by unreliable rainfall to Guyana farmers at risk from rising sea fells, climate change is impacting the most vulnerable (and the least responsible) the hardest.  


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Africa’s Population Surge

Africa’s Population Surge | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it
At current growth rates, sub-Saharan Africa, which now makes up 12 percent of the world’s population, will account for more than a third by 2100.

 

Africa is the world's fastest growing region and consequently it is an incredibly young (demographically speaking) region.  This video show key reasons (primarily cultural and economic) for the population growth within Africa.  How does the  demographic transition model apply to Africa?


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Melissa Marie Falco-Dargitz's curator insight, November 3, 12:46 PM

With declining rates of infant mortality, stable and growing maternity rates, the population of Africa is being projected to account for 33% of the world’s population. This may hold true unless we see what is happening in Europe, where increased maternal education and help with child rearing for society is leading to smaller families. So much so, that they have whole towns dying from lack of population replacement. China is seeing this as well with their “one child” program.  Unless sub-Saharan Africa starts a program heavy on education, the area will far exceed it’s ability to house and feed it’s populace.

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Does democracy stifle economic growth?

TED Talks Economist Yasheng Huang compares China to India, and asks how China's authoritarian rule contributed to its astonishing economic growth -- leading to a big question: Is democracy actually holding India back?

 

This compelling TedTalk explores the links between economic development and governmental style, oversight and influence.  While the speaker mainly discusses politics and economics in the context of China and India, Pakistan, Russia, North and South Korea are all mentioned.      


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Matt Mallinson's comment, November 21, 2012 11:11 AM
Democracy can stifle economic growth. War will definitely stifle economic growth. North Korea doesn't look like they're going to stop fighting South Korea, if only they would combine their lands, they would probably be a much better nation as one.
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 15, 2:17 PM

For Americans the idea that democracy can be anything but sunshine and rainbows is a hard pill to swallow. There is evidence that supports the contrary. Although democracy has the moral high ground, authoritative governments can grow at a faster rate because it does not have to address resistance where democracy fosters debate and dissent. In India, millions of people will not agree on everything and therefore progress can be slow going. 

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Why Invest in Women?

Why Invest in Women? | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

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Development data visualization

More about this programme: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00wgq0l Hans Rosling's famous lectures combine enormous quantities of public data with a sport's ...

 

If you haven't seen this video, it is an incredible data visualization to explain the correlation between income and life expectancy.  He uses temporal and spatial markers to show changes from 1810 to the present.  If you discuss it in your course, this would help to explain the epidemiological transition.


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What’s your local HDI (human development index)?

What’s your local HDI (human development index)? | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

"A recently-released online tool enables Californians to see where they stand on a “human development index” – a composite measure of health, knowledge and standard of living developed by the American Human Development Project of the Social Sciences..." 

This is cool.  Instead of aggregating the data at the country level and comparing countries, we can see differences in local levels of human development.  Students see patterns of socio-economics and development vividly, and in an intensely local way tailored to their regional frame of reference.   


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Tracey Sarvis's curator insight, November 9, 8:20 AM

Development and HDI