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Inclusive Business and Impact Investing
The first and highest rated scoop.it blog on sustainable and inclusive business and impact investing. The curations are mine.
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Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
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Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming?

Smarter Food: Does big farming mean bad farming? | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it
In Minnesota, ‘industrial’ operation shows effort to balance economic, environmental sustainability.

Via Seth Dixon
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Pranav Pradeep's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:24 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:33 AM

The large-scale agricultural practices of modern America tend to lend to the bad image of commercial farming. However, the practices are actually helping feed more people in the US, but they also use genetically modified crops and other highly debated techniques.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:45 AM

Yes it does because in all large scale endeavors, regardless of what for, the quality is always sacrificed for the quantity because it becomes cheaper to produce and profits are greater.

Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
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Brazilian Ethanol

Brazilian Ethanol | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

"Distilling ethanol from tropical sugarcane takes less land and uses less fossil fuel than starting with corn grown in temperate climes. That makes Brazilian ethanol, unlike the pampered and grotesquely wasteful American version, competitive with hydrocarbons and genuinely good for the environment." 

 

Although ethanol is working well for Brazil, there is a growing literature supporting the idea that wide-scale ethanol production is not sustainable or environmentally beneficial.  This is a great example to demonstrate that economic and environmental policies are locally dependent on geographic factors and are not universally transferable.  For a simple explanation of the differences in the economic and environmental differences in the production of sugar and corn-based ethanol, see: http://cei.org/studies-issue-analysis/brazilian-sugarcane-ethanol-experience  


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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2014 4:52 PM

Even though other countries have yet to catch on, the ethanol trend is a clever way to get ahead.  Their new strategy is a model for economic and environmental stability. Eventually, resources such as oil will run out as they are finite and in the long term, Brazil will have the upper hand. When the day comes that oil is extremely scarce, Brazil ill be hundreds of years ahead of the game.

Jacob Crowell's curator insight, December 8, 2014 11:25 AM

Brazil is taking advantage of its natural resources to make themselves competitive in the global market. Today geography can change the shape of the economics around the globe. The prospect of economic growth and energy competitiveness has made them short sighted.  Brazil has to beware of becoming a mono-commodity country that relies on a business that is not sustainable.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 7:35 PM

While only Brazil is taking part in this and it hasn't completely replaced gasoline it is without a doubt a step in the right direction that hopefully other nations can learn from. While the hypotheses over how much oil fluctuates it is undeniable it isn't a permanent solution, the future of fuel must lie in renewal resources. Unfortunately oil companies hold so much sway in politics its unknown how much change is actually possible today. Regardless of this hopefully one day the world as a whole will realize this and seek to emulate Brazil's in innovation.

Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Development studies and int'l cooperation
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New Soil Carbon Methodology Approved - WorldBank

New Soil Carbon Methodology Approved - WorldBank | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

A new methodology to encourage smallholder farmers in Kenya – and potentially worldwide -- to adopt improved farming techniques, boost productivity, increase their resilience to climate change, and earn carbon credits, has been given international approval.

The Verified Carbon Standard approved this first methodology on soil carbon, a new approach for sustainable agricultural land management (SALM) practices.

Photo: World Agroforestry Centre


Via CGIAR Climate, Paola Rattu
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Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Development studies and int'l cooperation
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Financing Agricultural Value Chains in Africa A Synthesis of Four Country Case Studie

The agricultural sector is essential for job creation,
food production and overall economic growth in
many developing countries. Africa’s agricultural potential is largely untapped, however, with value chains often unproductive and uncompetitive...

 

The report at hand represents the synthesis of a series of studies into agricultural finance in Africa sponsored by German development cooperation.


Via Paola Rattu
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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, March 12, 2014 7:26 AM

Financing Agricultural Value Chains in Africa A Synthesis of Four Country Case Studie

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Agriculture and Rural Development Day UN Climate Talks

Agriculture and Rural Development Day UN Climate Talks | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it
Farmers are at the forefront of dealing with climate change around the world. How are they coping, and what opportunities do the shifts present?

 

An excellent set resources discussing the plight of farmers various regional and ecological situations.  From the famers in Mozambique impacted by unreliable rainfall to Guyana farmers at risk from rising sea fells, climate change is impacting the most vulnerable (and the least responsible) the hardest.  


Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Development studies and int'l cooperation
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Vietnam ready to share experience in agriculture and rural development

Vietnam ready to share experience in agriculture and rural development | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it

Vietnam is willing to cooperate and share experiences in agriculture and rural development with other countries through the FAO’s South-South Cooperation Programme.


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Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Geography Education
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Analysis Finds 3x More Farmers’ Markets in Areas with the Lowest Obesity Rates

Analysis Finds 3x More Farmers’ Markets in Areas with the Lowest Obesity Rates | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it
An independent analysis conducted by mapping analytics firm PetersonGIS shows that locations with the highest obesity rates contain the fewest farmers’ markets.

 

Agricultural production has become a big business, not only in total dollars, but in the scale of production.  In the last 50 years, the rise of 'agribusiness' has dominated the food industry and has redefined how food is produced.  In reaction to this, farmers' markets and organic farming is enjoying success within select demographic groups...and this study shows some of the results of that linkage.


Via Seth Dixon
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Rescooped by W. Robert de Jongh from Development studies and int'l cooperation
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Bio-fuels, Speculation, Land Grabs = Food Crisis

New report calls for sweeping agricultural reform


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In-Depth Series: Rice 2.0

In-Depth Series: Rice 2.0 | Inclusive Business and Impact Investing | Scoop.it
A closer look at a tiny grain, with a giant footprint.

 

As the most important food source in the world, we must pay more attention to the geography of rice production and consumption.  


Via Seth Dixon
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